Young-Sanders Center for the Study

of  the

War Between the States in Louisiana

________________________________________________

Microfilm

Special Collections

William T. Shinn Memorial Library

________________________________________________

 

Manuscript Resources

On the

War Between the States in

Louisiana

(Acknowledgement page 148)


 A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U |V| W | X | Y | Z
Acknowledgement

 

 A

Adams, Israel L. and Family Papers, Mss. 3637, 1813-1890 [Natchez, Adams County, Mississippi; also Arkansas] Location:  Reel 1; Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

Israel L. Adams (1801-1860) was a merchant and farmer of Natchez, Mississippi.  He had six children, Harriet Catharine, Mary Eliza, Franklin Oliver “Frank,” Orlander Percival, Marey, and Laura.  Frank Adams and his cousins, James and Theodore, fought in the Confederate Army.  The Adams family was associated with the Zingline and Shupan families.

            This collection consists of 505 items and one manuscript volume.  Items include correspondence, bills, receipts, and printed items.  Most of the correspondence was written after 1860.  Letters written by the Adams children and other members of the Adams, Zingline, and Shupan families describe the Civil War in Arkansas and Mississippi; battles at Baker’s Creek (Champion’s Hill), Atlanta, Georgia, and Vicksburg, Mississippi; local news; illnesses; and deaths.  Letters from Orlander P. Adams describe student life at Mississippi College.  Other items in the collection include slave bills of sale, Confederate currency, the amnesty oath of Lewis Zingline, home remedies, and papers related to German immigrants.  Confederate States Army units documented include the 22nd Mississippi Regiment and the 126th Arkansas Infantry Regiment.

            A list of omissions from Israel L. Adams and Family Papers, Mss.3637, 1813-1890, is provided on Reel 1, Frame 0340. Omitted items consist of Papers, 1813-1858 and 1868-1890.

0006                Introductory Materials. 13 frames.

0019                Folder 29, Miscellaneous Manuscripts, 1859. 37

Frames.

0056               Folder 30, Miscellaneous Manuscripts, 1860. 34

Frames.

0090                Folder 31, Miscellaneous Manuscripts, 1861. 44

Frames.

0134                Folder 32, Miscellaneous Manuscripts, 1862. 21

Frames.

0155    Folder 33, Miscellaneous Manuscripts, 1863. 29

Frames.

0184    Folder 34, Miscellaneous Manuscripts, 1864. 43

Frames.

0227    Folder 35, Miscellaneous Manuscripts, 1865. 33

Frames.

0260    Folder 36, Miscellaneous Manuscripts, 1866. 38

Frames.

0298    Folder 37, Miscellaneous Manuscripts, 1867. 25

Frames.

0323    Imprints, 1837-1862. 17 frames.

0340    List of Omissions from Israel L. Adams and Family

Papers, Mss. 3637, 1813-1890. 1 frame.

 

Aiken, Henry T. Papers, 1862-1864, 1884, and 1899 [Louisiana; also Massachusetts] Location: Reel 23 Confederate Military Manuscripts, University of Texas at Austin

            This collection consists of family and Civil War correspondence of Henry Aiken. Included is material relating to hospital conditions and camp life. Aiken served in a Massachusetts artillery battery and took part in the attack on Port Hudson, Louisiana, and in the Red River Campaign.

0715                Introductory Materials. 2 frames.

0717    Correspondence, June 15, 1862- September 26,

1864. 45 frames.

0762                Correspondence, August 21- September 24, 1884,

[Also 1887 and 1889].

 

Alexander-Snodgrass Letters, Mss. 1767, 1863-1864 [Bristol, Tennessee; also Georgia] Location:  Reel 18; Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

This collection consists of three items, letters, 1863-1864, of Alexander Snodgrass, a major in the Quartermaster’s Department, 35th Alabama Regiment.  The letters tell of procuring salt for the Confederate States Army near Bristol, Tennessee, and wheat near Atlanta, Georgia.  Letters comment on skirmishes commanded by Gen. Humphrey Marshall in the area of Bristol, Tennessee, and on the Battle of Resaca, Georgia.

0180    Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0184                Letters, 1863-1864. 9 frames.

 

Allen, William M. Correspondence, Mss. 2287, 791, 1858-1863 [Holmesville, Pike County, Mississippi] Location:  Reel 1; Confederate Military Manuscripts Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge,

William M. Allen (b. 1832 or 1833) was a farmer of Holmesville, Pike County, Mississippi.  His sister, Letty, and her husband, John Houston, owned a farm in Minden, Webster Parish, Louisiana.  Both William and his brother, Felix, were Confederate soldiers in the Mississippi Volunteers.

            This collection consists of twenty-two items.  Pre-Civil War letters from John Houston discuss crops, weather, farmland, Houston’s advocacy of secession, and local social affairs.  Civil War letters from various individuals to William M. Allen describe skirmishes in Kentucky and Louisiana, camp life and conditions, duties, and war news, such as the shelling of Port Hudson, Louisiana.  Family affairs, illnesses and remedies, and attendance at the New Orleans, Louisiana, School of Medicine are additional topics of discussion in the correspondence.  Correspondence of 12 December 1862 includes a poem written from a soldier, William M. Allen, to his wife entitled “The Dream,” describing his vision of her and hopes for an end to war and separation.

0341    Introductory Materials. 9 frames.

0350    Folder 1, Correspondence, 1858-1863. 46 frames.

0396    Folder 2, Typewritten Copies, 1858-1863. 48

Frames.

 

Amacker, Obadiah Pearson Family Papers, Mss. 1604, 1861-1959 [East Fecliciana, St. Helena, and West Feliciana Parishes, Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 1; Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

The Amacker family settled in the Florida parishes of Louisiana in the early nineteenth century.  Obadiah Pearson Amacker (1838-1910) rose to the rank of acting colonel in the 3rd (Wingfield’s) Regiment, CSA Cavalry.  He married Abigail Means Kent in 1864.  Following his discharge in 1865, the family moved to Greensburg, Louisiana, where Obadiah practiced law.

            This collection includes a Civil War diary kept by Abigail (Kent) Amacker that describes life on the home front in the Florida parishes of Louisiana.  A list, 1861, of the officers and men of the first company to leave St. Helena Parish, Louisiana, as part of the 4th Regiment, Louisiana Infantry, and Confederate records transcribed from the Louisiana State Library Commission document the service of the Amacker family in the Civil War.  A printed pamphlet, 1959, contains genealogical records of the Amacker family from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries.

0444    Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0447    Folder 1, Papers, 1861-1865. 7 frames.

0454    Folder 2, Papers, 1959. 25 frames.

0479    Abigail Means (Kent) Amacker, Diary, 1862-1865.

 

32 frames.

 

Andry, Michel Thomassin and Family Papers, Mss. 1318, 1840-1882 [St. John the Baptist and St. Charles Parishes, Louisiana] Location:   Reel 1; Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

Michel Thomassin Andry (1811-ca. 1871) owned and operated sugar plantations in St. John the Baptist and St. Charles parishes, Louisiana.  His first wife was Martha Henriette Boudousquie and his second was Marie Rosa Haydel (1833-ca. 1877).  He was the father of five children.  After selling his plantations, he moved to New Orleans, where he lived until his death.

            This collection consists of 199 items arranged in three series.  The collection consists primarily of personal correspondence, legal documents, and business papers.  Most of the letters, many of which are in French, are addressed to Marie Rosa (Haydel) Andry from her brothers, Edouard C. Haydel (1835-1875) and Amelius M. Haydel, and include descriptions of various aspects of their participation in the Civil War.  The Battle of Shiloh, skirmishes at Camp Beauregard near Mayfield, Kentucky, and the Kentucky campaign are mentioned.  Other correspondence includes letters to and from Charles G. Andry, son of Michel T. Andry.  Letters from Charles Andrews Johnson (1818-1896), New Orleans attorney and close family friend, concern business matters and his travels.  Other letters tell of personal and financial difficulties suffered during the later way years and after the war.  In addition to extensive documents relating to the disputed sale of Michel T. Andry’s plantation in St. John the Baptist Parish, the legal papers include a will, a petition to sell slaves, oaths of allegiance, and plat maps showing Andry’s property holdings.  Business papers include receipts for taxes, receipts for goods and services, cancelled checks, promissory notes, and travel expenses.

0511    Introductory Materials. 19 frames.

0530    Box 1, Folder 1, Correspondence, 1849-1862. 41

Frames.

0571    Box 1, Folder 2, Correspondence, 1863- 1864. 68                 frames.

0639    Box 1, Folder 3, Correspondence, 1865-1875, and

1882. 61 frames.

0700    Box 1, Folder 4, Legal Papers, 1840-1841, 1843,

1857, 1862, 1865, 1870, and undated. 36 frames.

0736    Box 1, Folder 5, Business and Financial Papers,

1852, 1857-1865, and 1869-1872. 29 frames.

0765    Box 1, Folder 6, Business and Financial Papers,

1873-1879 and Undated 40 frames.

 

Anonymous Letters, Mss. 1032, 1864-1865 [New Dalton, Georgia, and Natchez, Mississippi] Location:  Reel 1; Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

This collection consists of two items, anonymous letters, 1864-1865.  Items include a soldier’s letters to his sister written from the headquarters of the 4th Battalion, Louisiana Volunteers (infantry), wintering at New Dalton, Georgia, relating personal news, 14 February 1864, and from Natchez, Mississippi, describing the reception he received upon his return from the service and his adjustment to civilian life, 10 December 1865.  The letters are signed by Rob [otherwise unidentified] to his sister May [otherwise unidentified] in western Virginia.

0805    Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0809    Letters, 1864-1865. 9 frames.

 

Archord, M. H. Drawing, Mss. 893, 1931 [East Baton Rouge, Louisiana] Location:  Reel 1; Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

This collection consists of one item, a map, drawn from memory by M.H. Archord in 1931.  The map depicts an area on the boundary of East Baton Rouge Parish and Livingston Parish, Louisiana, along the Amite River between Denham Springs on the south and Knox and Pierre Place on the north.  The map indicates that a Civil War skirmish or other war-related incident took place in this area in 1864.

0001    Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0004    Drawing, 1931. 2 frames.

 

Arnold, Thomas Letter, Mss. 3220, 1862 [Mississippi and Louisiana] Location:  Reel 1; Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

This collection consists of two items, including a letter, 26 April 1862, from Lt. Thomas Arnold to Capt. J.K. Mitchell of the Confederate States Navy, written from the towboat Landis describing an action in which he captured and then lost the Federal steamer Resolute.  His vessel was towed by the Confederate steamer Defiance and was then fired upon by Federal steamers and rendered inoperable.  Included is a list of night signals for the fleet, probably Confederate.

            N.B. Related collections among the holdings of the Virginia Historical Society include Mss3M6943a.  John Kirkwood Mitchell Papers, 1862-1865, included in UPA’s Confederate Military Manuscripts, Series A.

0818    Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0822    Letters, Mss. 26 April 1862. 4 frames.

 

Avery Family Papers, 1796-1924, Iberia Parish, Louisiana.  Location:  Reel 10, Antebellum Southern Plantations.

This collection contains correspondence and records of the Marsh and Avery families of the Petite Anse Island Plantation, later Avery Island, near New Iberia in Iberia Parish, Louisiana, and of Baton Rouge, Louisiana.  Prominent family members were Dudley Avery (d. 1816), medical officer of the Drafted Militia in New Orleans, 1814-1816; his son, Daniel Dudley Avery (1810-1879), lawyer in Baton Rouge, state senator, judge, and sugar planter; John Craig Marsh (1789-1857), who originally acquired Petite Anse Island Plantation; his son, George Marsh (d. 1859); and his daughter Sarah Craig Marsh (1818-1878), who married Daniel Dudley Avery in 1837.

            Included are correspondence and financial and legal records, dated 1817-1895.  Over half of the collection consists of financial and legal papers relating to the operation of the Petite Anse Island sugar plantation and salt mines.  These include plantation accounts, bills of sale for slaves (some bills executed in New Jersey), bills for merchandise, promissory notes, and receipts.  Correspondence includes letters from Dudley Avery serving as a medical officer in New Orleans during and after the War of 1812; letters, 1828-1845, between John C. Marsh and George Marsh at Petite Anse and their relatives in New York and Rahway, New Jersey, about family and plantation affairs; letters, 1846-1847, about life in New Orleans and other matters; and family letters from Baton Rouge and other locations in the 1850s.  Correspondence after the Civil War is chiefly to and from Daniel Dudley Avery and his business associates about the sale mines and plantation operations and between Avery and members of his family about plantation and personal affairs, including the struggle to hold onto the family property.

Biographical Note

There are two prominent families in these papers, the Marsh family and the Avery family; they were united by the marriage of Sarah Craig Marsh (1818-1878) to Daniel Dudley Avery (1810-1879) in 1837.

The parents of Daniel Dudley Avery were Captain Dudley Avery (d. 1816) and Mary Ann Browne (fl. 1807-1828).  In 1807 Capt. Dudley Avery of Onondaga County, New York, went to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he met and married Mary Ann Browne, daughter of the Reverend John W. Browne.  The Averys moved to Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where Captain Avery worked as a physician.  He served as a member of the legislature and, in 1813, was appointed as justice of the peace of East Baton Rouge Parish.

The parents of Sarah Craig Marsh were John Craig Marsh (1789-1857) and his first wife, Eliza Ann Marsh (d. 1826).  John Craig Marsh was born at Cherry Bank Farm, Rahway, New Jersey, on July 28, 1789.  He acquired Petite Anse Island Plantation, later known as Avery Island, ten miles south of New Iberia in Iberia Parish, Louisiana, probably in early 1818.  Petite Anse Island is a salt dome whose highest point rises approximately 180 feet out of the surrounding marsh.  The soil is fertile and Marsh operated a sugar plantation.

John C. Marsh took with him to Louisiana his wife, Eliza Ann Baldwin Marsh, his older son, John C. Marsh, Jr., his daughter, Sarah Craig Marsh (referred to as “Sally”), and several other relatives of uncertain relationship.  He left George Marsh, his second son, with his parents in Rahway, New Jersey.  Two other daughters, Margaret (later Mrs. Ashbel Burnham Henshaw), and Eliza Ann (later Mrs. William Robertson), were born on Avery Island.  John C. Marsh, Jr., died in 1820 and Eliza Ann Baldwin Marsh died in 1826.  After his first wife’s death, Marsh married Euphemia Craig (fl. 1820s), widow of his close friend and business partner, William Stone (fl. 1819-1827).

John C. Marsh was assisted in operating his sugar plantation by his second son, George Marsh (d. 1859), who appears to have been the primary manager of the plantation during the 1840s. In 1849 John Marsh sold his interest in the plantation to two of his sons-in-law, Daniel Dudley Avery and Ashbel Burnham Henshaw.  He eventually returned to New Jersey and died there in 1857.

Daniel Dudley Avery was born in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on April 12, 1810.  After his graduation from Yale College in 1830, he studied law with Thomas Gibbs Morgan and was admitted to the bar in 1832.  He settled in Baton Rouge and built up an extensive law practice.  Also in 1832, he was elected to the General Assembly as the representative from Baton Rouge and re-elected two years later, serving a total of four years.  He served as prosecuting attorney for the Florida District and was elected Circuit Judge in 1860.  He resigned this position in 1862 when New Orleans was taken by Union forces.

Avery held joint ownership of Petite Anse Island Plantation with George Marsh and Ashbel Burhnam Henshaw.  In 1854, Avery bought out Henshaw and controlled a two-thirds interest.

Daniel Dudley Avery and Sarah Marsh had six children:  Mary Eliza (b. 1838), Sarah Marsh (b. 1840), Dudley (b. 1842), John Marsh (1844-1891), George Marsh (b. 1846), and Margaret (b. 1848).

During the Civil War, Avery retired first to Petite Anse Island and then to Texas to avoid Union forces.  His son, Dudley, enlisted in the Delta Rifles from Baton Rouge and fought under Albert Sidney Johnston in the Shiloh campaign.  He was wounded and, after recuperating, joined the Confederate forces west of the Mississippi under the command of Lt. General Richard Taylor as a member of the 18th Louisiana Regiment.  Avery’s son John deferred going into the army to attempt to produce salt for the Confederacy at Petite Anse.  In 1862 he discovered the rock salt that lies under the island and heavily mined it for the Confederacy.  John Marsh Avery later enlisted in the army.

            After the war, both Dudley and John Marsh Avery became active in Louisiana politics.  Dudley served as president of the Police Jury of Iberia Parish, state senator, and delegate to the Democratic National Convention.  John served as state senator.  Dudley married Mary Louise Richardson while John remained a bachelor.

Of the other children, Mary Eliza married Edmund Mcllhenny and Sarah Marsh married Paul B. Leeds; Margaret Henshaw also married, although the name of her husband is not known.  George died as a baby.

N.B.  Biographical information was adapted from a sketch written in 1951 by Joseph S. Clark, descendant of the Averys.

Omissions

            A list of omissions from the Avery Family Papers is provided on reel 11, frame 1107, and consists of Subseries 1.8-1.9, Correspondence, 1866-1916, and Series 3, Pamphlets and Clippings, 1856-1879.

            N. B.  Omitted Materials will be included in a subsequent UPA series, Records of Southern Plantations from 1866 to 1920.

            A related collection among the holdings of the Southern Historical Collection is the Eliza Ann (Marsh) Robertson Papers, which is also included in this edition. Material regarding postbellum salt mining on the Avery plantations may be found in the Chouteau Collection among the holdings of the Missouri Historical Society which is proposed for inclusion in UPA’s microfilm series of Western history collections.

Introductory Materials:

0325    Introductory Materials. 20 frames.

Series 1. Correspondence and Financial, Legal, and Miscellaneous Material, 1796-1951 and undated:

Subseries 1.1: 1796- 1816

0345                Description of Subseries 1.1 1 frame.

0346                Folder 1, 1796- 1813. 15 frames.

0361                Folder 2, 1814. 17 frames.

0388                Folder 3, 1815. 37 frames.

0425                Folder 4, 1816. 25 frames.

Subseries 1.2: 1817-1827

0450                Description of Subseries 1.2. 1 frame.

0451                Folder 5, 1817- August 1818. 34 frames.

0485                Folder 6, September- December 1818. 33 frames.

0518                Folder 7, 1819-1823. 29 frames.

0547                Folder 8, 1824-1826. 17 frames.

0564                Folder 9, 1827. 15 frames.

Subseries 1.3: 1828-1835

0579                Description of Subseries 1.3. 1 frame.

0580                Folder 10, 1828. 38 frames.

0618                Folder 11, 1829-1832. 19 frames.

0637                Folder 12, 1833-1835. 21 frames.

Subseries 1.4: 1836-1845

0658                Description of Subseries 1.4. 1 frame.

0659                Folder 13, 1836-1839. 47 frames.

0706                Folder 14, 1840. 26 frames.

0732                Folder 15, 1841-1844. 30 frames.

0762                Folder 16, 1845. 21 frames.

Subseries 1.5: 1846-1847

0783                Description of Subseries 1.5. 1 frame.

0784                Folder 17, 1846. 47 frames.

0831                Folder 18, 1847. 32 frames.

Subseries 1.6: 1848-1860

0863                Description of Subseries 1.6. 1 frame.

0864                Folder 19, 1848. 14 frames.

0878                Folder 20, 1849. 36 frames.

0914                Folder 21, January- June 1850. 63 frames.

0987                Folder 22, July-December 1850. 69 frames.

REEL 11 Avery Family Papers cont.

Subseries 1.6: 1848-1860 cont.

0001                Folder 23, 1851. 75 frames.

0076                Folder 24, 1852. 34 frames.

0110                Folder 25, 1853-1854. 83 frames.

0193                Folder 26, 1855-1856. 62 frames.

0255                Folder 27, 1857-1858. 80 frames.

0335                Folder 28, 1859. 52 frames.

0387                Folder 29, January- August 1860. 52 frames.

0439                Folder 30, September- December 1860. 46

Frames.           

Subseries 1.7: 1861-1865

0485                Description of Subseries 1.7 1 frame.

0486                Folder 31, 1861. 74 frames.

0560                Folder 32, 1862-1864. 47 frames.

0607                Folder 33, 1865. 128 frames.

Subseries 1.10: undated

0735                Description of Subseries 1.10. 1 frame.

0736                Folder 47, Undated. 83 frames.

Series 2. Volumes, 1829-1924 and Undated

0819                Description of Series 2. 1 frame.

0820                Folder 48, Volume 1, Daniel Dudley Avery, Notes

On “Chemistry and Natural Philosophy,” taken at Yale College, 1829. 21 frames.

0841                Folder 49, Volume 2, George Marsh, Plantation

Accounts, 1849 to 1859. 14 frames.

0855    Folder 50, Volume 3, Register of Visitors at Petite

Anse Island, dated 1859 to 1863. 16 frames.

0871                Folder 51, Volume 4, Register of Visitors at Petite

Anse Island, dated 1859 to 1863. 19 frames.

0890                Folder 52, Volume 5, John Marsh Avery, Ledger,

1864 and Undated. 15 frames.

0905                Folder 53, Volume 6, Daniel Dudley Avery,

Ledger, 1864 and Undated. 15 frames.

0916                Folder 54, Volume 7, List of Persons Who

Received Announcements of the Marriage of Sarah Marsh Avery to Paul B. Leeds, April 26, 1866. 77 frames.

0993                Folder 55, Volume 8, Accounts, Possibly at a

Plantation Store, 1866-1867. 82 frames.

1075                Folder 56, Volume 9, John Leeds Avery, Records

of Cane Weighed, 1924. 29 frames.

Series 4 Picture of Abraham Avery, Undated

1104    Description of Series 4. 1 frame.

1105                Folder P-3289/1, Undated. 2 frames.

Omissions

1107                List of Omissions from the Avery Family Papers. 1

frame.

 

 

TOP

 

  B

Baines, Henry Papers, Mss. 1209, 1796-1905  [West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana; also Kentucky and Tennessee] Location:  Reel 1; Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

Henry Baines was a planter of Baines, West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, and a member of the London, England, Royal College of Surgeons.  He married Emily McDermott and from this union produced George W. Baines, Edward Baines, and Antoinette D. Baines.  Antoinette wed Isaac N. Maynard, manager of the New Orleans Clearing House Association.

            This collection consists of papers of the Baines, McDermott, and Maynard families.  Diverse topics are covered, including early landholdings in West Feliciana Parish, medical education in England, Confederate States Army service, and the cotton trade in New Orleans.  Papers of Henry Baines’s father-in-law, Patrick McDermott, consist of Spanish land grants, land deeds, petitions for appointment of tutors for minor children, and other legal documents concerning McDermott’s estate.  Papers of Isaac N. Maynard, Baines’s son-in-law, include family letters, 1838-1852, and an article, ca. 1884, on the Cotton Factors and Planters Exposition of New Orleans.  Letters from Edward Baines describe Confederate military living conditions in the area of Columbus, Kentucky, in 1861 and comment on various military units and army maneuvers near Tullahoma, Tennessee, 1863.

            A list of omissions from Henry Baines Papers, Mss. 1209, 1796-1905, is provided on Reel 1, Frame 0860. Omissions consist of Papers, 1796-1851 and 1870-1905.

0826                Introductory Materials. 11 frames.

0837                Folder 8, Papers, 1852, 1854, and 1858. 6

frames.

0843                Folder 9, Papers, 1861-1868. 14 frames.

0857                Folder 10, Papers, Undated. 3 frames.

0860                List of Omissions from Henry Baines Papers, Mss.

1209, 1796-1905. 1 frame.

 

Baldwin and Co. Records, 1879-1928, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana; Location: Reel 4; Records of Southern Plantations, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of several volumes of ledgers and accounts books from Baldwin and Company, the name of the plantation store of Old Johnson plantation in Baldwin, Louisiana. The first two volumes consist of records of purchases made at the store, many by agricultural laborers. There also records of purchases made at the store, many agricultural laborers. There are also records of sugar and molasses sales. Sugar production and sales are also recapitulated in Volume 4 and Volume 5. The last two volumes in the collection provide more opportunity to study sugar laborers. There are entries for wages paid to laborers and overseers and entries for cash advances.

0197                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0201                Volume 1, Ledger Accounts, 1879-1884. 123

frames. Major Topics: Store accounts; Labor

accounts; sugar and molasses sales.

0324                Volume 2, Index, Ledger D, 1880. 33 frames.

                        Major Topic: Store accounts.

0357                Volume 3, Receipt Book, 1895-1902. 127 frames.

                        Major Topic: Purchases made by Baldwin and Co.

from retail and wholesale stores and commission merchants.

0484                Volume 4, Cane Ledger, October-November 1900.

140 frames. Major Topic: Sugar production and sales.

0624                Volume 5, Recapitulation of Cane, 1900. 118

frames. Major Topic: Sugar production.

0742                Volume 6, General Farm Book with Indexes and

Payroll, 1927-1928. 52 frames. Major Topics: Labor accounts; cash advances; rice, indigo, cotton, and sugar production labor.

0794                Volume 7, Ledger Accounts, Payroll, 1927-1928.

46 frames. Major Topics: Labor accounts; cash advances; wages paid to overseers.

 

 

Ballinger, William Pitt Papers, 1816-1899 [Galveston, Houston, and Waco, Texas; also Louisiana, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia] Location: Reel 1-10, Confederate Military Manuscripts, University of Texas at Austin

This collection consists of correspondence, diaries, literary productions, business papers, legal papers, pamphlets, broadsides, newspaper clippings, maps, and a photograph. Items include papers produced and collected by Ballinger (1825-1888), soldier, Attorney, and businessman of Galveston. He began his law career at the close of the Mexican War (1846-1848), during which he served as adjutant under Albert Sidney Johnston. Ballinger served as U.S. district attorney for the Texas District and later opened his private law practice. Many of these papers relate to the financial and legal affairs of antebellum plantations in southeast Texas and Galveston businesses. A large number of papers document Ballinger’s service as Confederate States receiver for Galveston during the Civil War. His voluminous correspondence with Texan and Southern officials and with officers and men in Confederate service and his role in the negotiation of the surrender of Texas at the close of the war are also reflected here. His personal diary (1854-1886), which is accompanied by a typed transcript and an index, contains much information. Correspondents include Jefferson Davis, Josiah Gorgas, P. O. Hebert, Albert Sidney Johnston, John B. Magruder, and Edmund Kirby Smith.

            A list of omissions from the William Pitt Ballinger Papers, 1816-, is provided on Reel 1, Frame 0023. Omissions include Papers, 1816-1858 and 1866-1899, and Diaries, 1854-1858 and 1868-1886.

Reel 1

0001                Introductory Materials. 22 frames.

0023                List of Omissions. 2 frames.

0025                Papers, January 1859. 120 frames.

0145                Papers, February 1859. 88 frames.

0233                Papers, March 1859. 126 frames.

0359                Papers, April 1859. 162 frames.

0521                Papers, May 1859. 111 frames.

0632                Papers, June 1859. 149 frames.

0781                Papers, July 1859. 86 frames.

0867                Papers, August 1859. 86 frames.

0966                Papers, September 1859. 132 frames.

Reel 2

0003                Papers, October 1859. 69 frames.

0072                Papers, November 1859. 127 frames.

0199                Papers, December 1859. 104 frames.

0303                Papers, Undated 1859. 284 frames.

0587                Papers, January 1860. 92 frames.

0679                Papers, February 1860. 117 frames.

0796                Papers, March 1-23, 1860. 220 frames.

Reel 3

0003                Papers, March 24-31, 1860. 84 frames.

0087                Papers, April 1860. 144 frames.

0231                Papers, May 1860. 139 frames.

0370                Papers, June 1860. 131 frames.

0501                Papers, July 1860. 179 frames.

0680                Papers, August 1860. 99 frames.

0779                Papers, September 1860. 111 frames.

0890                Papers, October 1860. 144 frames.

Reel 4

0003                Papers, November 1860. 119 frames.

0122                Papers, December 1860. 118 frames.

0240                Papers, Undated 1860. 229 frames.

0469                Papers, January 1861. 175 frames.

0644                Papers, February 1861. 57 frames.

0701                Papers, March 1861. 311 frames.

Reel 5

0003                Papers, April 1861. 316 frames.

0319                Papers, May 1861. 61 frames.

0380                Papers, July 1861. 73 frames.

0453                Papers, August-September 1861. 63 frames.

0516                Papers, October-November 1861. 113 frames.

0629                Papers, December 1861. 133 frames.

0762                Papers, Undated 1861. 92 frames.

0854                Papers, January 1862. 142 frames.

0996                Papers, February 1862. 55 frames.

Reel 6 

0003                Papers, March 1862. 89 frames.

0092                Papers, April 1862. 62 frames.

0154                Papers, May 1862. 66 frames.

0220                Papers, June 1862. 62 frames.

0282                Papers, July 1862. 91 frames.

0373                Papers, August 1862. 63 frames.

0436                Papers, September 1862. 52 frames.

0488                Papers, October 1862. 46 frames.

0534                Papers, November 1862. 142 frames.

0676                Papers, December 1862. 86 frames.

0762                Papers, Undated 1862. 108 frames.

0870                Papers, January 1863. 119 frames.

0989                Papers, February 1863. 100 frames.

Reel 7

0003                Papers, March 1863. 85 frames.

0088                Papers, April 1863. 73 frames.

0161                Papers, May 1863. 84 frames.

0245                Papers, June 1863. 99 frames.

0344                Papers, July 1863. 109 frames.

0453                Papers, August 1863. 107 frames.

0560                Papers, September 1863. 109 frames.

0669                Papers, October 1863. 102 frames.

0771                Papers, November 1863. 68 frames.

0839                Papers, December 1863. 73 frames.

0912                Papers, Undated 1863. 124 frames.

Reel 8

0003                Papers, January 1864. 107 frames.

0110                Papers, February 1864. 50 frames.

0160                Papers, March 1864. 177 frames.

0337                Papers, April 1864. 144 frames.

0481                Papers, May 1864. 143 frames.

0624                Papers, June 1864. 135 frames.

0759                Papers, July 1864. 91 frames.

0850                Papers, August 1864. 110 frames.

0960                Papers, September 1864. 104 frames.

Reel 9

0003                Papers, October 1864. 86 frames.

0089                Papers, November 1864. 108 frames.

0197                Papers, December 1864. 102 frames.

0299                Papers, Undated 1864. 58 frames.

0357                Papers, January 1865. 90 frames.

0447                Papers, February 1865. 48 frames.

0495                Papers, March 1865. 69 frames.

0564                Papers, April 1865. 48 frames.

0612                Papers, May 1865. 65 frames.

0677                Papers, June 1865. 22 frames.

0699                Papers, July 1865. 43 frames.

0742                Papers, August 1865. 37 frames.

0779                Papers, September 1865. 62 frames.

0841                Papers, October 1865. 46 frames.

0887                Papers, November 1865. 45 frames.

0932                Papers, December 1865. 112 frames.

1044                Papers, Undated 1865. 56 frames.

Reel 10

0003                Diary, January 1 to December 31, 1859. 83

frames.

0086                Diary, January 1 to December 31, 1860. 171

frames.

0257                Diary, August 7, 1861, to February 22, 1862. 82

frames.

0339                Diary, February 23 to November 17, 1862. 102

frames.

0441                Diary, November 18, 1862, to October 20, 1864.

222 frames.

0663                Diary, October 26, 1864, to November 27, 1868.

260 frames.

 

 

Barber, M. W. and Durning, C. S. Diary, 1864 [Arkansas and Louisiana] Location: Reel 10: Confederate Military Manuscripts, University of Texas at Austin

            Daily account of camp life and troop movements kept by Union Corporal Barber (1843-1864) from January 1, 1864, through April 7, 1864. After Barber’s death at Sabine Cross Roads, Louisiana, the account is resumed by Confederate Private Durning, who kept it from April 9, 1864, through December 31, 1864.

0923                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0926                Omissions List. 1 frame.

0927                Diary. 72 frames.

 

Barnes, William Henry Papers, 1847-1933 [Kaufman County, Texas] Location: Reel 23; Confederate Military Manuscripts, University of Texas at Austin

            This collection contains Civil War correspondence by Barnes and includes material relating to camp life and hospital conditions. Barnes served in Colonel Lane’s Regiment, Texas Volunteers, Confederate Army. The collection also includes postwar correspondence, a diary from 1860, genealogical material, legal documents, deeds, election notices, and Confederate conscription legislation.

0802                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0805                Omissions List. 1 frame.

0806                Inventory. 1 frame.

0807                Correspondence, 1862-1863. 36 frames.

0843                Correspondence, 1891-1933. 26 frames.

0869                Diary, 1860. 9 frames.

0878                Genealogy. 22 frames.

0900                Legal Documents, 1857-1867. 39 frames.

0939                Legal Documents, 1868-1901. 62 frames.

1001                Literary Productions, 1867, 1872, and Undated. 6

frames.

1007                Notes and Memoranda, 1847-1861 and Undated.

7 frames.

1014                Printed Material; Invitations and Ticket, 1883

1886; Poems and Newspaper Clippings, Undated. 9 frames.

1023                [Untitled Folder—Deeds, Election Notices]. 14 frames.

1037                Cover Attachments [Conscription Materials]. 156

frames.

 

Barrow, Robert Ruffin Papers, 1857-1858.  Terrebonne parish, Louisiana Location:  Reel 2, Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations

Robert Ruffin (R.R.) Barrow was a sugar planter and canal operator in Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana.  He owned six Terrebonne Parish plantations, including Residence, Myrtle Grove, and Caillou Grove, as well as plantations in Lafourche, Assumption, and Ascension Parishes, and in Texas.

            This collection consists of a plantation journal kept by Residence Plantation manager Ephraim A. Knowlton and several overseers, including Robert P. Ford, George Bucknall, N.B. Holland, and Charles Lull.  The journal contains slave records, details of sugar production, records of daily operations, and reports of conflicts between slaves and overseers and between Barrow and his overseers as well as reports of fugitive slaves.  Slave records include slave lists, birth and death records, and mention of illnesses, tasks assigned, and items distributed to them.

            This collection is most useful for studying the complex relationships between plantation owners and their overseers and the relationships between overseers, field slaves, and slave drivers.  The journal also serves as an excellent source of information on slaves, containing extensive slave lists, accounts of resistance and punishments, and details of tasks assigned slaves.  It provides only limited information on R.R. Barrow’s family life, though a few references to his children and friends do appear.

Biographical Note. 

            Robert Ruffin Barrow (b. 1798) was a sugar planter and canal operator in Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana.  He was the oldest son of Bartholomew Barrow (d. 1852), a merchant at Fishing Creek, Halifax County, North Carolina, and Ascension Slatter Barrow.  Bartholomew Barrow moved his family to West Feliciana Parish in 1820, where he settled on his estate, Afton Villa.  Robert Barrow had two brothers, David Bennett and William Bennett Barrow, both of whom became planters.  William lived with Robert until his death in 1842.

            Robert Barrow (usually referred to as R. R. rather than Robert) owned six Terrebonne Parish plantations:  Residence, Caillou Grove, Honduras, Myrtle Grove, Crescent Farm, and Point Farm.  In addition, he owned Oak Grove Plantation in Lafourche Parish, Locust Grove Plantation in Assumption Parish; Donaldsonville Plantation in Ascension Parish; and several plantations in Texas.  Barrow also operated the Barataria and Lafourche Canal Company Number.2.

            In 1850 Barrow married Volumnia Washington Hunley, and they had two children, Volumnia Roberta (b. 1854) and Robert Ruffin, Jr. (b. 1858).

0001                Introductory Materials. 8 frames.

Series 1

0009                Folder 1, Robert Ruffin Barrow, Plantation

Journal, 1857-1858. 250 frames.

0259                Folder 2, Typescript of Plantation Journal, 1857

1858. 289 frames.

 

Barry, James Buckner Papers, 1847-1917 [Bosque County, Camp Cooper, Fort Belknap, and Walnut Springs, Texas] Location: Reel 24; Confederate Military Manuscripts, University of Texas at Austin

            This collection contains the papers of Barry (1821-1906), Indian fighter, sheriff, soldier, Texas Ranger, legislator, and People’s Party candidate for state treasurer (1898). The papers are especially useful for documenting Barry’s military and law enforcement activities in defense of the frontier against Indian attack. During the Civil War, he organized a company to take the frontier posts from Federal garrison, and after being promoted to lieutenant colonel, he commanded Fort Belknap and Camp Cooper in north-central Texas. Papers include correspondence muster rolls, battalion reports, general orders, special orders, account papers, diary reminiscences, and autograph books. Correspondents include John P. Baylor; Albert S. Burleson; Texas Governors Sam Houston and Francis R. Lubbock; and Confederate Generals Henry E. McCulloch, John B. Magruder, and Edmund Kirby Smith.

0001                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0006                Omissions List. 1 frame.

0007                Inventory. 1 frame.

0008                Correspondence, 1861-1862. 100 frames.

0108                Correspondence, 1863. 124 frames.

0232                Correspondence, 1864. 54 frames.

0286                Correspondence, 1865-1868 and ca. 1877-1891

30 frames.

0316                Confederate Army Orders, 1861-1866 and

Undated. 206 frames.

0522                Confederate Army Personnel Records, 1860

1863. 40 frames.

0562                Confederate Army Personnel Records, 1864. 35

frames.           

0597                Confederate Army Personnel Records, January

March 1865. 15 frames.

0612                Confederate Army Personnel Records, April- May

1865, 1866, Fragments, and Undated. 53 frames.

0665                Confederate Army Account Papers, 1856, 1861

1865, and Undated. 78 frames.

0743                Account Papers, 1864. 2 frames.

0745                Journal, ca. 1850-1865. 71 frames.

0816                [Untitled Folder—Muster Rolls, Company

Reports]. 269 frames.

1085                Muster Roll, Company C (Cattle Brands Included).

69 frames.

1154                [Untitled Folder—Ordnance Reports, Monthly Post

Returns, Muster Rolls]. 66 frames.

 

  

Batchelor, Albert A. Papers, Mss. 919, 1852-1930 [Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana; also Kentucky, Pennsylvania, and Virginia] Location:  Reel 1; Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

Albert Agrippa Batchelor (1845-1905) was a planter of Red River Landing, Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana.  Batchelor also managed several other plantations and served a term in the Louisiana State Legislature, 1888-1892.  Albert A. Batchelor and two of his brothers served in the Confederate Army.

            This collection consists of the papers, 1852-1930 (bulk 1870-1900), of Albert A. Batchelor.  The collection includes personal and business papers, correspondence, diaries, and account books pertaining principally to local events and the operation and management of several plantations in Pointe Coupee Parish, including Bella Vista Plantation, Lakeside Plantation, Phoenix Plantation, Highland Plantation, and Normandy Plantation.  Early letters among Batchelor family members describe conditions at Kentucky Military Institute and the Silliman Female Collegiate Institute and mention events such as African American slave insurrections in Natchez, Mississippi, 1863-1864, and military operations.  Several letters describe Civil War battles including the 1862 Battle of Kernstown, Virginia, and the 1863 battles of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and Chancellorsville, Virginia.  Letters of several soldiers document service in the 2nd Louisiana Infantry Regiment.

            A list of omissions from Albert A. Batchelor Papers, Mss. 919, 1852-1930, is provided on Reel 2, Frame 0797. Omissions consist of Papers and Volumes, 1866-1930.

0861                Introductory Materials. 46 frames.

0907                Folder 1, Papers, 1855-1859. 60 frames.

Reel 2

0001                Folder 2, Papers, January- May 1860. 32 frames.

0033                Folder 3, Papers, June- December 1860. 79

frames.

0112                Folder 4, Papers, 1861. 55 frames.

0167                Folder 5, Papers, 1862. 18 frames.

0185                Folder 6, Papers, 1863. 71 frames.

0256                Folder 7, Papers, January- July 1864. 100 frames.

0356                Folder 8, Papers, August-December 1864. 62

frames.

0418                Folder 9, Papers, 1865. 113 frames.

0531                Volume 8, Charles I. Batchelor, Diary, 1860 and

1864. 50 frames.

0581                Volume 9, Albert A. Batchelor, Diary, 1865-1867.

31 frames.

0612                Volume 10, Albert A. Batchelor, Ledger, 1865

1869. 54 frames

0666                Volume, 19, Albert A. Batchelor, Memorandum

Book, 1853-1859. 13 frames.

0679                Volume 20, Albert A. Batchelor, Memorandum

Book, 1859. 18 frames.

0697                Volume 21, Albert A. Batchelor, Memorandum

Book, 1860 and 1865. 19 frames.

0716    Volume 23, Albert A. Batchelor, Memorandum

Book, 1867-1869. 41 frames.

0757                Volume 33, Albert A. Batchelor, Notebook, 1860.

12 frames.

0769                Volume 34, Albert A. Batchelor, Notebook, 1861.

15 frames.

0784                Volume 35, Albert A. Batchelor, Notebook, 1861

and 1865. 13 frames.

0797                List of Omissions from Albert A. Batchelor Papers,

Mss. 919, 1852-1930. 1 frame.

 

Bayside Plantation Records, 1846-1866, Iberia and St. Landry Parishes, Louisiana, Location:  Reel 6; Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War.

Description of the Collection:  This collection consists of a two-volume plantation journal of Francis Dubose Richardson and others, apparently including overseers, about Bayside Plantation, Iberia Parish, Louisiana, 1846-1852 and 1860-1862, and a plantation on Bayou Mallet, near Opelousas, St. Landry Parish, Louisiana, 1863-1866.  Entries, made on a daily basis, consist of brief comments on sugar growing, plantation life, the condition of slaves and other plantation workers, brick making, fuel wood cutting, foodstuffs, and livestock.  There are references to the division of labor between men and women and to social life and customs in the area.  Entries in December 1862 relate to moving from Bayside Plantation to Bayou Mallet, and there are references to contracts with freedmen in 1865 and 1866.  There are also short personal financial and supply accounts and other brief notes appended to each journal.

Biographical Note.  Francis DuBose Richardson was born in Wilkinson County, Mississippi, in 1812, but came to Louisiana with his father, John Gaulden Richardson (1785-1856), and family in the 1820s.  Francis DuBose Richardson became a planter and state legislator, married Bethia F. Liddell (d.1852), and in January 1846, moved with his family, hired hands, and slaves to set up Bayside Plantation on Bayou Teche, Iberia Parish, Louisiana.  The Richardsons were given assistance at Bayside by other Richardson and Liddell family members, most of who are referred to in the plantation journals by initials only:  included are John Gaulden Richardson and Bethia’s father, Judge Moses Liddell.

            After Bethia F. (Liddell) Richardson died in 1852, Francis DuBose Richardson sent their youngest daughter, Margaret to live with relatives.  Their other children, Frank Liddell Richardson (fl. 1850s-1869) and Bethia C. Richardson (fl. 1840s-1870s), remained at Bayside, where they received a tutorial education until the Civil War.  In October 1861, Frank left to join the Confederate army, and Bethia C. left to attend the Franklin Seminary in Franklin, Louisiana.  The date of Francis DuBose Richardson’s death is unclear, though some sources indicate that he died in 1858.

            Bayside Plantation continued to operate until mid-December 1862, when everyone was moved to a plantation “in the woods on Bayou Mallet,” in St. Landry Parish, Louisiana, in response to the arrival in the area of the Union army.  The Richardson children visited both the Bayou Mallet and Bayside plantations at various times during the war, as did friends and relatives.  Both Confederate and Union forces operated in the area, and in 1863, most of the plantation slaves sought refuge for a time in New Iberia.  When the war ended, attempts were made to contract with freedmen and other labor to work on the plantations, with varying success.

0307                Introductory Materials. 11 frames.

0318                Folder 1, Volume 1, 1846-1852. 240 frames.

0558                Folder 2, Volume 2, 1860-1866. 196 frames.

0754                Folder 3, Typed Transcription of Volume 2,

February 27, 1860- October 25, 1862. 154 frames.

0908                Folder 4, Typed Transcription of Volume 2,

October 26, 1862- April 4, 1866. 168 frames.

 

Beall, William N.R. Telegram, Confederate States Army Collection, Mss. 3178, 1862 [Baton Rouge, Louisiana] Location:  Reel 3; Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Gen. William Nelson Rector Beall (1825-1883) was a West Point graduate.  He commanded the military camp at Port Hudson, Louisiana, when it surrendered to Union forces on 8 July 1863.

            This collection consists of one item, a telegram, 9 September 1862, from Gen. William N. R. Beall to Gen. Ruggles.  The telegram relates that the Union ironclad Essex passed Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on the previous day, and Beall requests permission to send one of his artillery batteries to Baton Rouge to replace a damaged battery.

0001                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0004                Telegram, 9 September 1862. 3 frames.

 

Beatty, Taylor Papers, 1780-1849, Lafourche Parish, Louisiana; also Virginia and Kentucky, Location: Reel 1; Southern Women and Their Families in the 19th Century, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Description of the Collection

            Taylor Beatty of Thibodaux, Louisiana, was a Confederate military judge, sugar planter, lawyer, and judge. He was the son of Charlotte Beatty (1810-1847) and the grandson of Walker Reid (b. 1783).

            Items in the collection include a volume that belonged to Walker Reid, containing Kentucky land entries, genealogical information on the Belt, Berkly, Blincoe, Botts, Gaines, Newman, Reid, Ward, and Wigginton families, and spiritual reflections. Also included is a diary of Charlotte Beatty for 1843 documenting daily activities involving her house and garden and visits with her friends.

            Also included in the original collection, but not here, are eighteenth-century land grants. Omitted materials are chiefly diaries of Taylor Beatty documenting his activities during the Civil War as friend of General Braxton Bragg, judge of the military court of Lt. Gen. Hardee’s Corps and participant in the battles of Santa Rosa Island, Florida, October 1861; Shiloh, April 1862; Murfreesboro, Tennessee, December 1862; Chickamauga, Georgia, September 1863; Resaca, Georgia, May 1864; and Franklin, Tennessee, November 1864. Also documented are in years 1883-1917 when he was a sugar planter in Louisiana and owned the plantations Dixie and Vivian, and a lawyer who attended court in Louisiana at Houma, Napoleonville, Thibodaux, and New Orleans.

            The collection is arranged as follows; Series 1, Land Grants and other Loose Papers [not included]; Series 2, Walker Reid Volume; Series 3, Diary of Charlotte Beatty; Series 4. Diaries of Taylor Beatty [not included]; and Series 5, Typed Transcriptions of Series 2, 3, and 4 [included in part with Series 2 and 3].

Biographical Note

            The chief figure in these papers is Taylor Beatty (1837-ca. 1917), son of Charlotte Beatty (1810-1847). He was a Confederate veteran, lawyer, and judge, and spent most of his life in Thibodaux, Lafourche Parish, Louisiana. He married Fannie Pugh (fl. 1883-1917), and had four children: Kate (fl. 1880s), Charlton (b. 1869), Charlotte (b. 1883), and Taylor (fl. 1891-1917). He owned Dixie and Vivian plantations.

            Charlotte Beatty also lived in Thibodaux. She was the daughter of Walker Reid (b. 1783), who moved to Kentucky in 1804 and settled in the town of Washington in Mason County. It appears that he moved to Kentucky from Virginia.

Omissions

            A list of omissions from the Taylor Beatty Papers is provided on Reel 1, Frame 0355, and includes Series 1, Land Grants and Other Loose Papers, 1733-1834 and undated; Series 4, Diaries of Taylor Beatty, 1861-1917; and Series 5, Typed Transcriptions of Series 2, 3, and 4 [included in part with Series 2 and 3].

Reel 1

0001                Introductory Materials. 14 frames.

0015                Description of Series 2. 1 frame.

0016                Folder 2, Volume 1, 1780-1849. 117 frames.

0133                Typed Transcription of Volume 1. 104 frames.

0237                Description of Series 3. 1 frame.

0238                Folder 3, Volume 2, 1843. 70 frames.

0308                Typed Transcription of Volume 2. 47 frames.

0355                List of Omissions from the Taylor Beatty Papers.

1 frame.

 

Beauregard, P.G.T. Cartoon, Mss. 3111, Undated [Louisiana] Location:  Reel 14; Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

This collection consists of one item, a hand-colored cartoon, undated, by Nathaniel Orr showing Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard on his back in a rough stream of water blowing a bugle.  The caption reads “Beauregard in his last Ditch.”

0639                Introductory Materials. 17 frames.

0656                Cartoon, Undated. 2 frames.

 

Beauregard, P.G.T. Letters, Mss. 2128-1858-1886 [Louisiana and South Carolina] Location:  Reel 2; Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard (1818-1893) was a Confederate States Army general of New Orleans, Louisiana.  Edward Clifton Wharton was a journalist and Confederate army major, also of New Orleans.

            This collection consists of ten items, correspondence, 1858-1886, of P.G.T. Beauregard.  Letters from Beauregard to Edward Clifton Wharton discuss personal matters and the authorship and publication of Beauregard’s reminiscences on the Civil War.  A letter, 1862, from R.M. Smith, provost marshal of the Confederate army, concerns Beauregard’s order to burn bales of cotton belonging to Andrew Turnbull, a British subject.  A letter, 1884, from John Johnson, a Confederate army major, recalls the condition of Fort Sumter, South Carolina, after sixty days of bombardment in the fall of 1864.

            N.B.A. related collection among the holdings of the Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections is Mss. 1553, 1575, 1594, 1610, 1613, 1660, 1714, 1736, Edward Clifton Wharton Papers, 1819-1947, included, in part, in the present edition.

0798                Introductory Materials. 7 frames.

0805                Folder 1 of 1, Letters, 1858-1886. 15 frames.

 

Becton, Edwin Pinckney Papers, 1862-1870 [Hopkins County, Texas] Location: Reel 25; Confederate Military Manuscripts, University of Texas at Austin

            These papers consist of transcripts and two original letters from the Civil War correspondence of Becton (1834-1901), physician at Tarrant and Sulphur Springs, with his wife, Mary. Transcripts of Becton’s speeches concern his activities as surgeon in the 22nd Regiment, Texas Infantry, during the Civil War; as a member of the Texas Legislature from Hopkins County (1868-1869); and as a candidate for election.

0001                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0004                Omissions List. 1 frame.

0005                Inventory. 1 frame.

0006                Correspondence, 1862-1865. 96 frames.

0102                [Untitled Folder—Correspondence, 1863]. 13 frames.

 

 

Bell, James T. Letter, Mss. 3453, 1864 [Alabama and Ohio] Location:  Reel 2; Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

James T. Bell, a first lieutenant, served under Capt. John B. Hazard in the 21st Alabama Infantry Regiment.  Bell assumed charge of this regiment after the death of Hazard at Johnson’s Island Prison, Ohio, in February 1864.  Johnson’s Island Prison was in the Sandusky Bay area of Lake Erie.  About three thousand Confederate officers were held there at the close of the Civil War.

            This collection consists of one item, a letter, 28 February 1864, of James T. Bell, Johnson’s Island Prison, Ohio.  The letter is written to Capt. John B. Hazard’s sister, Mrs. Mary Whitaker, in Alabama, and refers to “Ben,” Benjamin Andrews Whitaker, Mary Whitaker’s husband.  It details Hazard’s illness, last wishes, and death at Johnson’s Island Prison.  Described are the physical conditions at the prison, the weather, the medical facilities, the Confederate medical staff, and the illnesses rampant among the prisoners of war.  Mentioned in the letter are the Confederate surgeons Col. Steadman of the 1st Alabama Regiment, Capt. Sessions of the 18th Mississippi Regiment, Capt. Locke of the 53rd Alabama Cavalry, and Col. Christian of a Virginia regiment.  Mr. Helm, chaplain of the 1st Tennessee Regiment, and Capt. George S. Markham from Demopolis, Alabama, and of the 58th Alabama Regiment, were present at Hazard’s death.

0820                Introductory Materials. 9 frames.

0829                Letter, 28 February 1864. 5 frames.

 

Bell, John W. Papers, Mss. 771, 1862-1864 [Clarke County, Alabama; also Tennessee] Location:  Reel 2; Confederate Military Manuscript, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

John W. Bell, a captain in Company H, 32nd Alabama Infantry Regiment, served in Alabama and Tennessee during the Civil War.  He was married to Nancy Bell of Coffeeville, Clarke County, Alabama.

            This collection consists of three items and one volume, papers, 1862-1864, of Capt. John W. Bell.  Items include letters written to Nancy Bell from Camp Forney, Alabama, and Lavergne, Tennessee.  Correspondence discusses complaints of soldiers who had not been paid and lists names of officers to whom John W. Bell had loaned money.  Letters also describe economic conditions on local farms, women who brought their children to the camps in order to secure food for them, and women who worked as paid laundresses for the soldiers.  A notebook lists personal items and expenses of John W. Bell.

0834    Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0838                Papers, 1862- 1864. 28 frames.

 

Bennet, Miles S. Papers, 1838-1927 [Texas] Location: Reel 25; Confederate Military Manuscripts, University of Texas at Austin

            These papers consist of a diary and memorandum book containing information about the Presbyterian General Assembly in 1852 as well as Civil War muster rolls and various financial, military, agricultural, and medical information. Transcriptions of letters and historical narratives primarily dealing with the Battle of the Salado (1842) are also included.

0115                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0118                Omissions List. 2 frames.

[Note: no materials from this collection were filmed.]

 

Birge, N.A. Papers, Mss. 918, 1036, 1861-1865 [Monroe and Shreveport, Louisiana; also Jefferson, Texas] Location:  Reel 2; Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

N. A. Birge was a captain and assistant quartermaster in the Confederate States Army.  He served at the Monroe Army Post in Louisiana; Shreveport, Louisiana; and Jefferson, Texas.

            This collection consists of eighty-eight items, papers, 1861-1865 (bulk 1862-1864), of N. A. Birge.  Papers consist of copies of official forms, routine correspondence from army personnel, and a few letters from soldiers.  Requisitions, vouchers, and receipts for clothing, camp equipment, transportation, and medical supplies approved by Confederate States Army personnel and referred to Birge for payment during 1862-1864 are included.  The impressments of cotton in Texas is discussed in two letters from Col. W.A. Broadwell, Office of the Cotton Bureau, Headquarters, Trans-Mississippi Department.

0866                Introductory Materials. 15 frames.

0881                Papers, 1861-1865. 119 frames.

 

Black, William W. Family Papers, 1845-1911 [Panola County, Texas; also Louisiana] Location: Reel 25; Confederate Military Manuscripts, University of Texas at Austin

            Papers in this collection relate to Black (1820-1862), a physician in Panola County, as well as to the Robb family of New Orleans, and they reflect the social, political, cultural, and financial activities of various family members and friends. Correspondence and financial records primarily concern Black’s medical career and his service in the Confederate Army as a captain in the 14th Texas Cavalry Regiment (Dismounted). Black died during the Army of Tennessee’s campaign of 1862-1863.

0120                Introductory Materials. 6 frames.

0126                Omissions List. 1 frame.

0127                Inventory. 1 frame.

0128                Personal Correspondence: Letters from William

Black to Melinda Black, 1862 and Undated. 23

frames.

0151                Personal Correspondence: Papers of Melinda

Black Dosson, 1861-1884 and Undated. 11 frames.

0162                Correspondence: Robb Family, 1864-1911. 7

frames.

0169                Photographs. 4 frames.

 

Blanchard, D.A. Receipts, Mss. 2142, 1863 [Richmond, Virginia] Location:  Reel 3; Confederate Military Manuscript, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of three items, receipts, 1863, of Capt. G. Barksdale, assistant quartermaster at Richmond, Virginia.

0251                Introductory Material. 3 frames.

0254                Receipts, 1863. 4 frames.

 

Bledsoe, Joseph Papers, 1854-1865 [Austin and Brownsville, Texas] Location: Reel 25; Confederate Military Manuscripts, University of Texas at Austin

            This collection contains the correspondence of Bledsoe (1827-1880), who came to Texas in the early 1850s as a surveyor, practiced law in Austin (1854-1858) and Denton (1858-1860), and was wounded as a Confederate soldier. In later life he served as judge of the Twenty-seventh District and practiced law in Sherman. The letters concern Brownsville during the Civil War and Austin before and after it.

0173                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0176                [Untitled Folder—Correspondence, 1854-1865].

12 frames.

 

Boudreaux, Maximilien E. Family Papers, 1856-1927 Assumption Parish, Louisiana; Location: Reel 15; Records of Southern Plantations, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of the papers of Maximilien e. Boudreaux of Assumption Parish. The records primarily relate to Boudreaux’s financial and business affairs and to the production of sugar and molasses. There are records of advances made to tenant farmers and to laborers. Time books record hours of work and wages earned by laborers on Boudreaux’s lands.

0001                Introductory Materials. 2 frames.

0003                [Papers], 1856-1878. 28 frames. Major Topic:

Store accounts.

0031                [Papers], 1879-1893. 33 frames. Major Topics: Personal finances; shipping accounts; store accounts; molasses production and sales; taxation.

0064                Ledger, 1878-1879. 35 frames. Major Topics:

Personal finances; labor accounts.

0099                [Correspondence], 1894-1913. 43 frames. Major

Topic: Advances to tenant farmers.

0142                Volume 1, Cashbook, 1922-1927. 61 frames.

Major Topic: Personal finances.

0203                Volume 2, Memorandum Book, 1860-1880. 47

frames. Major Topics: Personal finances; cash advances.

[Volume 3 missing in original collection.]

0250                Volume 4, Time Book, 1880. 24 frames. Major

Topic: Labor accounts.

0274                Volume 5, Time Book, 1886-1888. 29 frames.

                        Major Topic: Labor accounts.

 

 

Boyd, John Diary, 1850-1871, Pointe Coupée Parish, Louisiana, Location:  Reel 14, Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War.     

            Description of the Collection, John Boyd was born in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, on February 18, 1783, and died on July 30, 1858 at his plantation, “Oak Grove.” He owned a plantation on Bayou Lettsworth in Pointe Coupée Parish, Louisiana, which may or may not have been this “Oak Grove.” He may also have owned property near Donaldsonville, Louisiana. One of his daughters, Margaret Bruce, married Colonel Henry T. Williams of Montgomery County, Maryland, and the Williams’s daughter, Clara D., married Lieutenant Edward D. Seghers of the Confederate army.

            This collection consists of Boyd’s diary. The diary provides only brief, irregular entries, January 1, to June 25, 1850. Expense accounts and planting records were entered in the book in 1859 and 1866, and additional expense accounts were apparently added in 1870 and 1871.  The diary begins with a description of a trip Boyd took to New Orleans. Boyd also noted in January that he traveled up the Mississippi River to his plantation in Pointe Coupée Parish and briefly described the condition of his slaves and land. Other entries concern the weather, visits to and from his neighbors, various trips he made by boat, and, in May, descriptions of the water level in a river, possibly the Mississippi, which rose and fell after a series of storms. A typed transcription of entries made in 1850, 1859, and 1866 is available.

Biographical Note

Related collections among the holdings of the Southern Historical Collection include the Edward D. Seghers Papers and the Henry L. Duffel Papers. These collections are open to researchers on site at the Southern Historical Collection.

0463                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

Diary

0468                Folder 1, Original, 1850-1871. 63 frames.

0531                Folder 2, Typed Transcription of 1850, 1859, and

1866 Entries. 16 frames.

 

Bradbury, Charles W. Papers, 1817-1854, New Orleans, Louisiana; also Indiana, New York, and Ohio; Location: Reel 1 & 2; Southern Woman & Their Families, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

            The Bradbury family were residents of Manlius and Canandaigua, New York; Cincinnati and Montgomery, Ohio; Madison, Indiana; and New Orleans, Louisiana. Family members included Jacob Bradbury (fl. 1817-1825); Cornelius S. Bradbury (fl. 1817-1848); Elizabeth A. Bradbury (fl. 1817-1825); and Charles William Bradbury (fl. 1832-1856). Madaline Selima Edwards (fl. 1843-1848), C. W. Bradbury’s New Orleans mistress, is also significant in this collection.

            Chiefly consists of letters to Cornelius S. Bradbury, 1818-1825; correspondence, financial and legal papers, and memorandum books of Charles W. Bradbury, 1832-1852; and notebooks, containing essays, poems, and other writings, and diaries of Madaline S. Edwards, 1843-1847. Legal papers include items relating to purchases of slaves, real estate, and a cottonseed manufacturing plant in or near New Orleans. Letters include descriptions of social life and customs in the various places of residence of the Bradbury family, descriptions of traveling through southern Indiana and down the Ohio Mississippi Rivers from Cincinnati to New Orleans, and reflections on their relationship by Charles Bradbury and Madaline Edwards. Also included are three daguerreotypes, a photograph, and an ink sketch.

            The collection is arranged as follows: Series 1, Correspondence and Other Loose Papers; Series 2, Writing Books, Diaries, and Memorandum Books; and Series 3, Pictures.

Biographical Note

            Jacob Bradbury (fl. 1817-1834), apparently a doctor and farmer, was married to Mary Bradbury (fl. 1817-1842); their children included Elizabeth A. Bradbury (fl. 1817-1835); Cornelius S. Bradbury (fl. 1818-1848); Charles William Bradbury (fl. 1835-1856); Mrs. C. I. (Bradbury) Doan (fl. 1835-1842); James Anson Bradbury (fl. 1835-1848); and Marcus T. I. Bradbury (fl. 1834-1848).

            Cornelius S. Bradbury moved from Canandaigua, New York, to Cincinnati in about 1820. He married Sarah (surname unknown) Bradbury (fl. 1821-1844) in about 1822. Jacob Bradbury moved from Manlius, New York, to Montgomery, Ohio, in late 1821; the rest of his family followed in 1822. By 1834 many of the family had removed to Madison, Indiana.

            Charles William (“Charley”) Bradbury moved to New Orleans in 1835. He married Mary Anne (Hamilton) Taylor (fl. 1836-1852) in 1836. The New Orleans directory shows that Charles William Bradbury resided on Estelle Street between Constance and Magazine in 1838; in 1852, he was an insurance broker with an office at the corner of Erato and Bacchus (Baronne) streets; in 1853 he was at No. 75 St. Charles Street; the 1856 directory lists him as a “Cottonseed and Lard Oil Manufacturer,” with an office on Circus Street, corner of Girod.

            Madaline Selima (“Mad”) Edwards (fl. 1843-1848), originally from Tennessee and later Mississippi, was living in New Orleans when she met Charles W. Bradbury. She apparently became his mistress, and he purchased a house for her use in October 1843. References in the papers indicate that Mrs. Edwards was raised by and uncle in Tennessee and was married at his house, and that three of her children died in Clinton, Mississippi. Another connection to Charles W. Bradbury was Helen (“Ellen”) Hart, apparently of Cincinnati, Ohio.

0356                Introductory Materials. 14 frames.

Series 1

0370                Description of Series 1. 2 frames.

0372                Folder 1, 1817-1820. 18 frames.

0390                Folder 2, 1821. 15 frames.

0405                Folder 3, 1822-1825. 17 frames.

0422                Folder 4, 1832-1834. 19 frames.

0441                Folder 5, 1835. 18 frames.

0459                Folder 6, 1836-1837. 27 frames.

0486                Folder 7, 1838-1840. 18 frames.

0504                Folder 8, 1841-1842. 34 frames.

0538                Folder 9, 1843-1844. 38 frames.

0576                Folder 10, 1845-1846. 12 frames.

0588                Folder 11, January- June 1847. 34 frames.

0622                Folder 12, September 1847-1849. 23 frames.

0645                Folder 13, 1852-1854. 45 frames.

Series 2

0690                Description of Series 2. 1 frame.

0691                Folder 14, Volume 1, Madeline Selima Edwards,

Writing Book, December 1843- September 1844.

168 frames.

0859                Folder 15, Volume 2, Madeline Selima Edwards,

Writing Book, October 1844- April 1847. 153 frames.

Reel 2

0001                Folder 16, Volume 3, Madeline Selima Edwards,

Diary, 1844. 70 frames.

0071                Folder 17, Volume 4, Madeline Selima Edwards

Diary, 1845. 71 frames.

0142                Folder 18, Volumes 5-6, Charles W. Bradbury,

Memorandum Books, 1846-1847. 23 frames.

Series 3

0166                P-3011/1-5. 11 frames.

 

 

Brashear and Lawrence Family Papers, 1804-1982, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana; also Kentucky and New York, Location: Reel 7, 8, 9 & 10 Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War.

Description of the Collection: Walter Brashear (1776-1860) was a physician in Kentucky before 1822 when he moved to St. Mary Parish, Louisiana, where he become a sugar planter and state legislator after acquiring Belle Island Plantation and other landholdings in the area. The family of Effingham Lawrence (d.1850) and Ann Townsend Lawrence (fl. 1802-1830s) lived in Bayside, New York, until sons Robert (fl. 1820’s-1850s), Samuel Townsend (d. 1839), Henry Effingham (1809-1876?), and Effingham, Jr. (1820?-1878) moved to New Orleans to take up merchandizing and sugar planting. Henry Effingham Lawrence married Frances Emily Brashear, daughter of Walter and Margaret Barr Brashear, in 1844.

            This collection contains correspondence among members of the Brashear, Lawrence, and related Barr, Parker, Clay, Tilton, and Townsend families. Subjects include observations while traveling in Ohio, Pennsylvania (especially Pittsburgh), and Mississippi in the 1820s and1830s; physician Walter Brashear’s life in Lexington, Kentucky, in the 1820s and 1830s; sugar growing, slavery, and medical care in St. Mary Parish, Louisiana; Louisiana politics, especially in the 1840s; and various aspects of the Confederacy. Letters from the Lawrence brothers in New Orleans to their relatives in New York in the 1820s offer observations by Northerners on life in the south. Civil War correspondence and the diary of Henry Effingham Lawrence refer in some detail to military operations and the effects of the war in St. Mary Parish and, more generally, to events throughout the country. Correspondence with the Lawrence children at the Louisiana Institute for the deaf and the Dumb and the Blind at Baton Rouge, the Whipple School at Mystic River, Connecticut, Miss Bolton’s School at Middletown, Connecticut, and the Hellmuth Ladies School at London, Ontario, Canada, concerns school, social life, and family matters in the 1860s and 1870s. There are also scattered financial and legal materials; miscellaneous writings, and other materials.

Biographical Note

            Walter Brashear (1776-1860), was a surgeon, sugar-planter, an exporter of ginseng to China, and, beginning in 1834, member of the Louisiana legislature. Though born in Maryland, he was raised and lived in Bardstown, Nelson County, Kentucky, until 1822, when he moved to St. Mary Parish (Attakapas region), Louisiana. He acquired extensive landholdings in the area, including Belle Island Plantation, and what was known in the 1860s as the Town of Brashear or Brashear City, now Morgan City. A sketch of Walter Brashear appears in the Filson Club Quarterly, XXVll, pp. 156-157.

            Margaret Barr (1781-1834) of Kentucky married Walter Brashear in 1803. The Brashear’s had at least six children: Mary Eliza, Rebecca Tilton, Carolina Imly, Walter B., Thomas Todd (d.1858), and Frances Emily (1819-1895) who married Henry Effingham Lawrence (1809-1876?) in 1844.

            Henry E. Lawrence was the son of Ann Townsend (fl. 1802-1830s) and Judge Effingham Lawrence (fl. 1802-d. 1850) of Bayside, Long Island, New York. (Among his siblings were Samuel Townsend [fl. 1820s-1839], Robert [fl. 1820-1850s], and Effingham, Jr. [1820?-1878].) He moved from Long Island to New Orleans about 1836, became a merchant, acquired Magnolia Plantation, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, and, after marrying Frances E. Brashear, became associated with the Brashear landholdings in St. Mary Parish.

            Henry and Frances Lawrence had seven children, six of whom were Walter B., Townsend B. (“Towny”), Robert B. (“Bob”), Nancy B., Lydia B., and Margaret (“Maggie”). Five of these children were deaf-mutes. Frances Brashear moved to Long Island, New York, during the Civil War and lived on the Brashear plantations with various of her children in her later years.

0861                Introductory Materials. 17 frames.

Subseries 1.1.1

0878                Description of Subseries 1.1.1. 1 frame.

0879                Folder 1, 1802-1818. 45 frames.

0924                Folder 2, 1821-1823. 60 frames.

0984                Folder 3, 1824-1828. 25 frames.

1009                Folder 4, 1829-1830. 35 frames.

Reel 8

Subseries 1.1.1

0001                Folder 5, 1831-1832. 38 frames.

0039                Folder 6, 1833-1834. 43 frames.

0082                Folder 7, 1835-1837. 46 frames.

0128                Folder 8, 1838-1843. 41 frames.

Subseries 1.1.2

0169                Description of Subseries 1.1.2. 1 frame.

0170                Folder 9, 1802-1808. 53 frames.

0223                Folder 10, 1818. 16 frames.

0239                Folder 11, June 1820. 54 frames.

0293                Folder 12, July 1820. 28 frames.

0321                Folder 13, 1821-1824. 29 frames.

0350                Folder 14, 1825-1827. 27 frames.

0377                Folder 15, 1829-1834. 40 frames.

0417                Folder 16, 1835-1837. 74 frames.

0491                Folder 17, 1838. 61 frames.

0552                Folder 18, 1839-1840. 58 frames.

0611                Folder 19, 1841-1843. 62 frames.

Subseries 1.2

0673                Description of Subseries 1.2 1. frame.

0674                Folder 20, January- June 1844. 57 frames.

0731                Folder 21, July- December 1844. 58 frames.

0789                Folder 22, 1845. 85 frames.

0874                Folder 23, 1846-1848. 42 frames.

0916                Folder 24, January-February 1849. 57 frames.

0973                Folder 25, March-December 1849. 70 frames.

1043                Folder 26, 1850. 61 frames.

Reel 9

Subseries 1.2

0001                Folder 27, 1851. 67 frames.

0068                Folder 28, 1852-1853. 76 frames.

0144                Folder 29, 1854-1859. 80 frames.

0224                Folder 30, 1860. 42 frames.

Subseries 1.3

0266                Description of Subseries 1.3. 1 frame.

0267                Folder 31, 1861-1862. 54 frames.

0321                Folder 32, 1863. 65 frames.

0386                Folder 33, 1864. 60 frames.

0446                Folder 34, 1865. 81 frames.

Subseries 1.4

0527                Description of Subseries 1.4

0528                Folder 35, 1866-1868. 70 frames.

0598                Folder 36, 1869-1870. 77 frames.

0675                Folder 37, 1871-1874. 88 frames.

0763                Folder 38, January-April 1875. 70 frames.

0833                Folder 39, June 1875-1887, 1897. 89 frames.

Subseries 1.5

0922                Description of Subseries 1.5. 1 frame.

0923                Folder 40, Undated. 45 frames.

Series 2

0968                Description of Series 2. 1 frame.

0969                Folder 41, 1803-1860. 36 frames.

1005                Folder 42, 1870-1874. 34 frames.

1039                Folder 43, Undated. 4 frames.

Reel 10

0001                Description of Series 3. 1 frame.

0002                Folder 44, Henry Effingham Lawrence, Diary,

1862- July 1863. 154 frames.

Series 4

0156                Description of Series 4. 1 frame

0157                Folder 45, Writings, ca. 1856-1858 and Undated.

38 frames.

0195                Folder 46, Printed Materials, 1892-1960 and

Undated. 61 frames.

0256                Folder 47, Eccles Register, 1982. 69 frames.

 

 

Brumby and Simpson Family Papers, 1847-1865, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana; also Mississippi: Location: Reel 7; Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War

Description of the Collection, Sarah Catherine Brumby Simpson (1840-1915), daughter of John Greening Brumby and Catherine Sarah Remley Brumby of Benton and Goodman, Mississippi, is the central figure in these papers. Sarah had at least five brothers and three sisters. In 1858, she married Richard Simpson (d. 1871) of Covington, Louisiana. A businessman, Simpson traveled frequently throughout Louisiana and Texas. Together they had four children.

            Although Sarah Brumby Simpson was the recipient of the vast majority of the letters in the collection, the insight they provide into her life is limited. Most illuminating on her personal affairs are letters she received from her husband, discussing their children and finances. The lives of her other siblings emerge more fully in the letters. They shared with her news of their travels, family events, and activities, and freely discussed their feelings and worries about family, political, and social events.

            A handful of letters are addressed to other family members, including Sarah’s brother-in-law, Augustus Vaughan. Civil War letters provide information on troop conditions and civilian hardships, especially in Tennessee and Mississippi. Other topics of interest in the letters are courtship; Arnoldus Brumby’s medical practice; postwar economic conditions; religious fervor among women in Marietta, Georgia, during the Civil War; and family life.

            The papers are useful for the study of a variety of topics, including family life in the ante-bellum and postwar South, the experiences of civilians and soldiers in the Civil War, and social and religious life in Louisiana and Mississippi. The Civil War letters are the fullest in terms of their emotional and factual depth.

Biographical Note

            Sarah Catherine Brumby Simpson (1840-1915) was the daughter of John Greening Brumby and Catherine Sarah Remley Brumby of Benton and Goodman, Mississippi. Sara Catherine was referred to sometimes as Sarah, sometimes as Sallie, and sometimes as Kate. She had at least five brother, Arnoldus S. (1832-1892), Robert E. (1834-1864), John (1838-1863?), James R. (b. 1846), and Thomas Micajah (b. 1852), and three sisters, Virginia Carolina (1836-1915), Mary E., called Mollie (1844-1907), and Emily (1848).

            In 1858 Sarah Brumby married Richard Simpson (d. 1871) of Covington, Louisiana, and moved there with him. Simpson traveled frequently throughout Louisiana and Texas as a business agent for several clients. The Simpsons had four children, Mary Ellis, Pearl, Eloise, and Richard. A letter of June 4, 1871, mentions that after Simpson’s death in 1871 Sarah considered opening a millinery shop with one of her sisters, but no evidence appears to document whether she ever went through with her plans. Letters addressed to her show that Sarah lived in Knoxville Tennessee, in 1906, and in St. Petersburg, Florida, from 1907 until her death in 1915.

            Two of Sarah’s brothers, Robert E. and John Greening Brumby, Jr., lost their lives in the Civil War. Her brothers, Arnoldus, studied medicine and became a physician in Holmes County, Mississippi. Another brother, James R., after serving in the Confederate army, became a cooper in Marietta, Georgia. In the 1870s he set up a chair manufacturing firm there, being joined by his brother Thomas Micajah Brumby. Thomas later left their partnership to set up a competing company. Sarah’s sister, Mary E. (called Mollie), married Augustus Vaughn and lived in Goodman, Mississippi, and later Little Rock, Arkansas. Her sister, Virginia Carolina, married a Mr. Wellons and lived in Marietta, Georgia. Emily lived in Fort Gaines, Florida.

            Only sketchy information is available on Sarah’s children. Her daughter, Mary Ellis (called Nellie), married James C. Talley, and her daughter, Eloise, married T. A. Gramling. Another daughter, Pearl, remained unmarried. No evidence appears about whether or who her son Richard (also called Dick and Bud) married.

Omissions

            A list of omissions from Simpson and Brumby Family Papers is provided on reel 7, frame 0860, and consists of Subseries 1.2, Correspondence, 1866-1909, and Series 2, other Papers, 1860-1945.

0669                Introductory materials. 11 frames.

Subseries 1.1: 1847-1858, and 1860-1865.

0680                Description of Subseries 1.1 1 frame.

0681                Folder 1, 1847, 1857-1858. 68 frames.

0749                Folder 2, 1860-1865. 111 frames.

Omissions

0860                List of Omissions from the Simpson and Brumby

Family Papers. 1 frame.

 

Brusle, Charles A. Papers, Mss. 558, 1605, 1627, 1854-1905 [Plaquemine, Iberville Parish, Louisiana] Location : Reel 3; Confederate Military Manuscript, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Charles A. Brusle, a sugar planter of Plaquemine, Iberville Parish, Louisiana was a Confederate States Army officer, Company A, 3rd Louisiana Infantry; member, 1857-1861, of the state House of Representatives; state senator; Iberville Parish tax collector; and sheriff.

            This collection consists of thirty-two items, including three volumes, papers, 1854-1905, of Charles A. Brusle. Items include personal papers, a diary, a record book, and newspaper clippings from a scrapbook. Antebellum papers, 1854-1860, include recommendations for Brusle’s matriculation at the University of Virginia and a letter from Pierre Soule introducing Rep. Sidney Lewis. Civil War papers concern Brusle’s commission as a captain, his appointment as aide-de-camp to Brig. Gen. Louis Hebert, and his capture and parole as a prisoner of was Postwar materials include a broadside issued during Brusle’s campaign for state senator; letters from Louisiana Governor Samuel D. McEnery; a petition requesting Brusle to run for the office of mayor of Plaquemine; and a letter from the National Reconstruction Party addressing early Reconstruction problems in rural parishes and registration of whites in New Orleans. The record book consists of accounts with Rosa Brusle, 1864; expenses of Monticello Plantation, Louisiana, 1865; and Brusle’s personal observations of the Confederate government in early 1864.

            A list of omissions from Charles A. Brusle Papers, Mss. 558, 1605, 1627, 1854-1905, is provided on Reel 3, Frame 0470. Omitted items consist of a scrapbook and printed volumes. Volume 1, Diary, 1861, was inadvertently omitted in microfilming but is open to researchers on site at the Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections, Hill Memorial Library, Louisiana State University Libraries.

0290                Introductory Materials. 14 frames.

0304                Folder 1, Papers, 1854-1905. 55 frames.

0359                Folder 2, Newspaper Clippings, 1857-1875. 31 frames.

0390                Folder 3, Newspaper Clippings, 1880-1893. 28

frames.

0418                Folder 4, Newspaper Clippings, Undated. 28

frames.

0446                Volume 2, Pocket Record Book, 1864-1865. 24

frames.

0470                List of Omissions from Charles A. Brusle Papers,

Mss. 558, 1605, 1627, 1854-1905. 1 frame.

 

Bryan, Arthur John Papers, 1841-1872 [Dallas and McLennan County, Texas; also Arkansas, Louisiana, and Missouri] Location: Reel 10; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            Bryan was a captain of the Texas Rangers in the Civil War and a member of the Third Texas Cavalry. His papers include a memorandum book, a Republican ticket list, survey field notes, receipts, legal papers, a muster roll, and other military papers.

0999                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

1004                Correspondence, 1841-1872 and Undated. 92

frames.

 

Burges-Jefferson Family Papers, 1836-1960 [Texas; also Mississippi and Virginia] Location: Reel 25; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection primarily contains family correspondence and business documents of the Jefferson and Burges families. Jefferson family materials include personal correspondence of John R. Jefferson Jr., brigadier general in the Mississippi militia (1842-1846), tavern owner, stage line operator in Seguin, Texas (1853-1858), and confederate marshal for the Western District of Texas (1862-1865); his wife, Eliza A. Coorpender Jefferson; and their daughter, Mattie S. Jefferson (died 1877). Most letters were written during the Civil War and concern camp life as well as family and community affairs. Also included are official documents relating to John Jefferson’s Confederate post as well as a copy of his amnesty from President Andrew Johnson; slave lists, a bill of sale for a slave, and an obituary of a former slave of Joseph Henry Polley, one of Stephen F. Austin’s colonists; a “Premium Ticket purchased at a Concert given by the Ladies of Seguin for the Benefit of the Hospitals at Richmond, Virginia, and Victoria, Texas for the Texas Soldiers, January 1st, 1862”; a broadside advertising a sale of damaged cotton, 1864; material relating to a flag made by Seguin women and presented to Hood’s Texas Brigade in 1861; and several letters from William C. Walsh (1836-1924), a lieutenant in the Tom Green Rifles and later a state land commissioner. Burges family materials include correspondence of William H. Burges (1838-1898), lawyer and state senator (1880-1881); his third wife, Mary Lou (Mamie) Jefferson Burges; and their children. One letter contains a firsthand account by W. H. Burges of the Battle of Fredericksburg, 1862.

0188                Introductory materials. 6 frames.

0194                Omissions List. 1 frame.

0195                Inventory. 1 frame.

0196                Mattie Jefferson: Personal Correspondence, 1858

1861. 45 frames.

0241                Mattie Jefferson: personal Correspondence, 1862

1864. 90 frames.

0331                Mattie Jefferson: personal Correspondence, 1865

1869 and Undated. 27 frames.

0358                John R. and Eliza A. Coorpender Jefferson Family:

Personal Correspondence, 1836, 1861-1862, 1888; Business and Legal Documents, 1858-1892. 99 frames.

0457                Burges Family: Personal Correspondence, 1853

1920. 7 frames.

0464                [Untitled Folder-List of Slaves Set Free;

Correspondence]. 12 frames.

0476                [Untitled Folder-Photographs, Broadsides]. 17

frames.

 

TOP

 

C

Cable, James B. Papers, Mss. 1765, 1862-1913 [Lauderdale and Long Beach, Mississippi] Location: Reel 3 Confederate Military Manuscript, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

This collection consists of sixty-one items and one printed volume, papers, 1862-1913; of James B. Cable.  Papers consist of Letters, 1862-1913; Miscellaneous, Undated; Poems, 1897-1910; Stories, 1890-1901; and Printed Volume, 1880. Letters, 1865-1866, from Cable to his mother mention his work as an orderly at Oliver Hospital, Lauderdale, Mississippi, during the Civil War. Letters from Cable’s brother George indicate his indifference and aversion to seeing James.

            A list of omission from James B. Cable Papers, Mss. 1765, 1862-1913, is provided on Reel 3, Frame 0512. Omitted items include Letters, 1885-1913; Miscellaneous, Undated; Poems, 1897-1910; Stories, 1890-1901; and Printed Volume, 1880.

0471                Introductory Materials. 10 frames.

0481                Folder 1, Letters, 1862 and 1865-1866. 31

frames.

0512                List of Omissions from James B. Cable Papers,

Mss. 1765, 1862-1913. 1 frame.

 

Caffery Family Papers, 1838-1850, Iberia and St. Mary Parishes, Louisiana, Location: Reel 7 Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War

            This collection includes correspondence of the Caffery and Richardson families of Iberia Parish, Louisiana. Prominent family members include Bethia Liddell Richardson (d. 1852); her husband, Francis DuBose Richardson (b. 1812), sugar planter at Bayside Plantation on Bayou Teche and state legislator; their daughter, Bethia Richardson Caffery (fl. 1866-1907) and her husband, Donaldson Caffery (1835-1906), son of Donelson Caffery (fl 1830s) and Lydia Murphy Caffery McKerall (fl. 1835-1881), lawyer in Franklin, Louisiana, sugar planter, Confederate soldier, state legislator, and U.S. senator. 1892-1901.

            This collection chiefly consists of personal correspondence among Caffery and Richardson family members. Most of the Richardson family papers are dated 1838 to 1852 and cover topics such as sugar planting, purchases and settlement of land, and family activities. The bulk of the Caffery family papers fall between 1866 and 1906. Their letters are chiefly about family activities, but Donelson Caffery also wrote about politics in Louisiana and Washington, D.C. There are letters written to Donelson, while he was a senator, congratulating him on his stand on the gold standard, two letters from Grover Cleveland, and letters concerning Democratic party matters. Letters from later years deal chiefly with Donelson’s efforts in the face of financial difficulties, including work on his sugar plantations and attempts at establishing oil wells.

Biographical Note

            Bethia Richardson Caffery was the daughter of Francis DuBose Richardson (b. 1812) and Bethia Liddell Richardson (d. 1852). The Richardsons lived first near New Iberia and later at Bayside Plantation on the Bayou Teche near Jeanerette in Iberia Parish, Louisiana. Francis was a sugar planter and also served in the Louisiana state legislature during the early 1850s.

            Bethia Richardson married Donelson Caffery in 1869. Caffery was the son of Donelson Caffery (fl. 1830s) and Lydia Murphy Caffery (fl. 1835-1881). After the death of his father, his mother married Watson McKerall. Donelson Caffery attended school in Franklin, Louisiana, and St. Mary’s College in Baltimore, Maryland. He later studied law in the office of Joseph W. Walker and at Louisiana University in New Orleans. After completing school he apparently began sugar planting on Bayou Cypremont near the Gulf of Mexico. Bethia and Donelson Caffery had ten children.

            Caffery joined the Crescent Rifles in New Orleans in January 1862. He was transferred to the 13th Louisiana Regiment and fought in the battle of Shiloh. Later he was made lieutenant on the staff of Brigadier General W. W. Walker and remained in that position until the end of the war.

            After the war Caffery began to practice law and continued in sugar planting. He became involved in Louisiana politics and in 1879 was elected to the Louisiana state constitutional convention. In 1892 he was elected to the state Senate and that same year was appointed to the U.S. Senate when Randall L. Gibson died. Two years later he was reelected and served until the expiration of his term in 1901. As a senator, Caffery opposed free silver and the war with Spain. He was active in the formation of the National or “Gold” Democratic party and was nominated as that party’s candidate for president in 1900; he declined in order to return home and resume the practice of law and cultivation of his sugar plantation. He died in 1906.

            The exact location and number of plantations owned by Donelson Caffery is not known; however, it is believed he owned at least two, Haifleigh and Bethia Plantation, both of which were located in St. Mary’s Parish near Franklin, Louisiana.

            N.B. Biographical information was taken from a sketch on Donelson Caffery by Eugene M. Violette in the Dictionary of American Biography, Vol. lll, pp. 402-403.

Omissions

            A list of omissions from the Caffery Family Papers is provided on reel 7, frame 0668, and includes Subseries 2.2-2.6, Papers on the Caffery Family, 1866-1925 and Undated.

0359                Introductory Materials. 17 frames.

Series 1

0376                Description of Series 1. 1 frame.

0377                Folder 1, 1838-1839. 58 frames.

0435                Folder 2, 1840. 49 frames.

0484                Folder 3, 1841-1842. 46 frames.

0530                Folder 4, 1843-1847. 47 frames.

0577                Folder 5, 1850-1852. 42 frames.

Series 2: Subseries 2.1

0619                Description of Subseries 2.1. 1 frame.

0620                Folder 6, 1855-1859. 48 frames.

Omissions

0668                List of Omissions from the Caffery Family Papers.

1 frame.

 

Cahan, Solomon Application, Confederate States Army Collection (M), Mss. 1063, 1863 [Alexandria and Vermilion Parish, Louisiana] Location: Reel 3 Confederate Military Manuscript, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Solomon Cahan, a French citizen and a merchant, was conscripted as a private into Company I of the Crescent Regiment, Louisiana Infantry (24th Louisiana Infantry Regiment), by Capt. H. B. Stevens, provost marshal of Vermilion Parish.

            This collection consists of two items, an application and memorandum, 1863, concerning the discharge of French citizens from the Confederate States Army. The application, 6 August 1863, of Solomon Cahan requests a discharge from the Confederate States Army and states that he is a French citizen. The application is signed by Cahan’s superior officers. Included is a memorandum, 28 August 1863, from headquarters, District of Louisiana at Alexandria, stating that an application for discharge of a French subject (presumably Cahan) has been denied.

0513                Introductory Materials. 3 fames.

0516                Application, 1863. 4 frames.

 

 

Cameron, Bluford Alexander Papers, 1862-1950 [Belton, Texas; also Arkansas and Louisiana] Location: Reel 10 & 25; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection consists of a letter, a diary with transcription, family notes, artifacts, and photographs relating to the career of Bluford Alexander Cameron as a sergeant in the Confederate Army and to the history of the Whitsitt and Cameron families.

1096                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

1101                Diary and Description, April 1862- July 1863;

Letter, 1863. 68 frames.

1169                Photographs, Mrs. Martha Huffines Cameron,

Joseph Huffines, Undated. 5 frames.

 

Carter, A.G. and Miller, John C. Letter, Mss. 4623, 1862 [East Baton Rouge, East and West Feliciana Parishes, Louisiana] Location: Reel 3 Confederate Military Manuscript, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            A. G. Carter and John C. Miller were deputy provost marshals, Confederate States Army. Daniel Ruggles (1810-1897) was a native of Barre, Massachusetts. A graduate of the U.S. Military Academy, he saw action in the Seminole Wars and Mexican War. He married into a Virginia family and on 7 May 1861 resigned from the U.S. Army to enter Confederate service. He was commissioned a brigadier general on 9 August 1861 and served at Corinth, Mississippi, early in the war under Albert Sydney Johnston. He held several district and departmental commands during the course of the war and was appointed commissary general of prisoners, 30 March 1865.

            This collection consists of one item, a letter, 13 July 1862, to Brig. Gen. Daniel Ruggles from A. G. Carter and John C. Miller, deputy provost marshals. The letter documents actions of Federal forces against the inhabitants of the Louisiana parishes of East Baton Rouge, East Feliciana, and West Feliciana. The letter contains requests for troops to defend the parishes and for the planting of batteries along the Red River.

0520                Introductory Materials. 6 frames.

0526                Letter, 13 July 1862. 4 frames.

 

Cavitt, Josephus Papers, 1860-1865 and 1868 [Robertson County and Wheelock, Texas] Location: Reel 10; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

These papers concern the career and family of cavitt (born 1826), stock raiser and militiaman in Robertson County, and relate to conscription under the Confederacy in Texas (1863); sequestration, condemnation, confiscation, and sale at public auction of lands taken as property of alien enemies of the Confederate States (1863-1864); the selling of slaves; Reconstruction; and Cavitt’s application for special amnesty. Included are correspondence, financial papers, military orders, muster rolls, a deed, a certificate, and a broadside.

1174                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

1178                Miscellaneous Documents, 1800-1856. 17 frames.

1195                [Muster Roll]. 10 frames.

1205                CSA, District Court. Receiver’s Sale of Confiscated

Lands, September 20, 1863. 3 frames.

 

Chalmers, James Ronald Letter, Mss. 2699, 1861 [sic, 1862] [Mississippi] Location: Reel 3 Confederate Military Manuscript, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            James Ronald Chalmers (1831-1898) was a Confederate general and a postwar U.S. congressman from Mississippi. He was a district attorney and a member of the Mississippi Secession Convention. As colonel of the 9th Mississippi Infantry, he commanded at Pensacola, Florida. In February 1862, he was promoted to brigadier general and served with distinction throughout the war. Braxton Bragg (1817-1876) was a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy and veteran of the Mexican American War, who retired and became a Louisiana sugar plantation owner before joining the Confederate States Army. Bragg served as major general, Department of Alabama and West Florida, 14 October 1861—28 February 1862, and in a number of other commands during the war.

            This collection consists of one item, a letter, 3 January1861 [sic, 1862], to Maj. Gen. Braxton Bragg from James Ronald Chalmers. The letter was written at Camp Bragg while Chalmers was a colonel in the 9th Mississippi Regiment. It acknowledges on behalf of the officers of that unit the receipt of a barrel of golden syrup from Mrs. Bragg.

0530                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0533                Letter, 3 January 1861 [sic, 1862]. 2 frames.

 

 

Chambers, Rowland Diaries, Mss. 839, 1849-1863 [Vicksburg, Mississippi; also Louisiana] Reel 3 Confederate Military Manuscript, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

Dr. Rowland Chambers (ca. 1803-1866) was an itinerant dentist from Vicksburg, Warren County, Mississippi. He practiced dentistry in North St. Louis, Missouri, in 1849; in Panama City, Panama, in 1850; and in Yazoo County, Mississippi, and Richmond, Madison Parish, Louisiana, from 1858 to 1860, before returning to Vicksburg.

            This collection consists of seven volumes, diaries, 1849-1863, of Dr. Rowland Chambers. Six diaries, 1849-1863, describe places visited, names of patients (including names of their slaves), Chambers’s health and the health of his parents, his activities at home and local events, visitors received, and the weather. The diary for 1862-1863 describes his activities in Vicksburg, Mississippi, including the siege of Vicksburg, beginning with the events of 26 May 1862 and continuing through the summer until the withdrawal of Federal forces. Coverage of the siege continues in December 1862 with the resumption of the Federal campaign through June 1863. Chamber’s diaries contain financial accounts listing yearly income, types of dental work performed, and payments received for services. The collection also includes a diary of Augustus Lattz of Company H, 76th Regiment of Illinois Volunteers, which contains entries concerning the activities of this regiment, 10 January-25 July 1863.

0535                Introductory Materials. 10 frames.

0545                Diaries, Volume 1, 1849-1852. 45 frames.

0590                Diaries, Volume 2, 1849-1851. 31 frames.

0621                Diaries, Volume 3, 1858. 192 frames.

0813                Diaries, Volume 4, 1859. 71 frames.

0884                Diaries, Volume 5, 1860. 164 frames.

Reel 4

0001                Diaries, Volume 6, 1858 and 1862-1863. 115

frames.

0116                Diaries, Volume 7, Augustus Lattz, 10 January-25

July 1863. 33 frames.

 

Civil War Miscellany, 1855-1956 [Texas; also Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia] Location: Reel 11; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection consists of diverse items connected in some way with the Civil War. The material concerns both Union and Confederate soldiers and has many points of origin. Predominant in the collection is a Civil War biographical file containing personal letters to and from soldiers, as well as a few official letters and documents and a few papers not related to the war. Among the items included are financial records of the River and Railroad Transportation Office of the Quartermaster Department of the Union Army in Little Rock, Arkansas, including transport of troops, supplies, and refugees; the diary of a Union soldier of the Fifteenth Corps; stereoviews of the siege of Port Hudson, Louisiana, May 27 to July 9, 1863; conscription and exemption documents; and Special Field Order No. 65 (April 27, 1865) from William T. Sherman terminating the war for armies under Albert Sidney Johnston [Joseph E. Johnston] and for the country east of the Chattahoochie River. Included are correspondence, a diary, military orders, requisitions, commissions, election certificates, financial records, stereoviews, and poems.

0001                Introductory materials. 15 frames.

0016                Allen, Stephen. 2 frames.

0018                Armistead, George. 10 frames.

0028                Atkins, Seth. 4 frames.

0032                Austin, Travis County (Unidentified

Correspondence, 1863). 6 frames.

0038                Besser, Charles. 5 frames.

0043                Bonner, M. H. 5 frames.

0048                Boyce, William. 3 frames.

0051                Brent, G. W. 3 frames.

0054                Brown, Thomas. 3 frames.

0057                Camp Near Los Indolons (Brownsville, Texas),

1865. Unidentified. 4 frames.

0061                Camp Gano, Sevier County, 5 Miles Below the

Indian Territory Line. 4 frames.

0065                Clark, James. 5 frames.

0070                Clopton, Anthony and H. 6 frames.

0076                Cobb, Thomas R. 4 frames.

0080                Cramer, Charles. 11 frames.

0091                Divine, Patt. 4 frames.

0095                Douglas, W. S. 3 frames.

0098                Drayton, Thomas F. 8 frames.

0106                Enloe, Abraham. 13 frames.

0119                Featherston, W. S. 3 frames.

0122                Ferguson, S. W. 4 frames.

0126                Forrest, Nathan B. 4 frames.

0129                Gandy, B. P. 4 frames.

0133                Garland, Samuel. 5 frames.

0138                Gist, William. 37 frames.

0175                Harper, William. 4 frames.

0179                Helmitag, F. W. 2 frames.

0181                Hemphill, John. 2 frames.

0183                Hill, A. C. [Alexander Campbell]. 11 frames.

0194                Hunter, D. 9 frames.

0203                Hurley, W. W. 9 frames.

0212                [Unreadable]. 4 frames.

0216                Cecil (William) papers. 20 frames.

0236                Jackson, “Stonewall” (Hair from Old Sorrel’s

Tail). 3 frames.

0239                Johnson, Irwin. 3 frames.

0242                Krumbbar, W. B. 6 frames.

0248                Leach, William A. 7 frames.

0255                Lubbock, F. R. 6 frames.

0261                Lyne, W. H. 3 frames.

0264                Marsh, S. W. 5 frames.

0269                McGee, W. S. 3 frames.

0272                Miles, William (to Beauregard). 32 frames.

0304                Moffatt, J. S. 4 frames.

0308                Moon, A. B. 4 frames.

0312                Morris, R. H. 5 frames.

0317                Neal, William A., July 18, 1864. 4 frames.

0321                New London, New York, July 1862 (Unidentified

Correspondence). 4 frames.

0325                Oden, Joseph. 11 frames.

0336                Olds, W. C. 3 frames.

0339                Parker, G. M. 2 frames.

0341                Robinson, Alfred l. 3 frames.

0344                Ross, Robert. 18 frames.

0362                Smith, Georgia. 2 frames.

0364                Smith, Thomas. 6 frames.

0370                Stuart, J. E. B. 2 frames.

0372                Terrell, John C. 2 frames.

0374                Wallis, J. E. 4 frames.

0378                Ward, S. L. 3 frames.

0381                Wellborn, Abs. 3 frames.

0384                Wyatt, W. H. 3 frames.

0387                Wymangliness, Anson. 3 frames.

0390                Wynne, W. D. 4 frames.

0394                Yale, J. W. 8 frames.

0402                Miscellaneous Photocopies of Civil War Letters in

the Thomas O. Moore Collection, State Historical Society of Wisconsin. 67 frames.

0469                Foster, Thomas C. 6 frames.

0475                Civil War letters; Colonel George W. Guess to Mrs.

Sarah Horton Cockrell, 1861-1865. 128 frames.

0603                Lohr, [?]. 28 frames.

0631                Civil War Documents-Schindler’s Antique Ship

Purchase. 76 frames.

0707                Military Order # 65. 3 frames.

0710                Special Order #174, Shreveport, Louisiana,

October 27, 1863. 3 frames.

0713                Civil War Financial Statements (Arkansas). 67

frames.

0780                Poem (12th Texas Regiment). 3 frames.

0783                Conscription Documents. 28 frames.

0811                [Unidentified Folder]. 5 frames.

0816                Omissions List. 1 frame.

 

Civil War, Official Battle lists of 1861-1865. 2 Rolls. 16mm. National Archives RG 94. M823. YSC Location: Microfilm Cabinet 3, Drawer 6

            On the two rolls of this microfilm publication are reproduced nine Civil War battle lists, hereafter designated (a) thought (i), which were compiled in the War Department between the years 1867 and 1907. Lists (a) through (e) were created in the Adjutant General’s Office (AGO) for administrative and historical purposes; lists (g) and (h) were created in the Surgeon General’s Office as indexes to casualty records that were subsequently transferred to the Record and Pension Office of the AGO along with other medical records useful in acting on Pension requests from Civil War veterans. Lists (a) through (e), (g), and (h) are now part of Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1780’s-1917, Record Group 94. List (f) is excerpted from the Volunteer Army Register and lists (i) is accepted from The Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion.

            The battle lists reproduced in this microfilm publication indicate which Union troops were engaged in particular Civil War Operations and often include additional data, such as casualties. All the battle lists in this microfilm publication are incomplete compilations and reflect the numerous inaccuracies found in the original and secondary sources from which they were compiled. Compiler’s misinterpretations of source data resulted in additional errors in the lists. Despite these shortcomings, the battle lists can serve as valuable tools in seeking out sources of data in Civil War related records.

            Battle lists (a) through (d) were originally assigned letter symbols for ease of citation in the National Archives and Records Service (NARS) publication Military Operations of the Civil War: A Guide-Index to the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, 1861-1865 (5 vols., Washington, 1968). Battle lists (e) through (i) were not so designated in the Guide-Index, but they have been assigned letter symbols in sequence with the previous four lists for ease of citation in this microfilm publication.

Battle List (a)

            Battle list (a) presumably was prepared in 1867 in connection with the publication that year of the last two volumes of the

1. Official Army Register of the Volunteer Force of the United States Army for the Years 1861, ’62, ’63, ’64, ’65 (8 vols., Washington: Adjutant General’s Office, 1865-1867).

2. The Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion, 1861-65 (2 parts of 3 vols. Each, Washington: Government Printing Office, 1870-88).

            Volunteer Army Register for the Civil War. The battle list was prepared in two handwritten versions, one arranged chronologically and the other arranged alphabetically by geographic location. The two versions contain identical information derived from muster rolls, strength returns, and other kinds of original records. For each combat, battle list (a) shows which Volunteer troop units were involved. Occasional references are provided to Regular Army participation.

            A number of penciled corrections in the chronological version apparently represent an early attempt to alter or eliminate entries thought to be erroneous, but an examination of these entries shows that some were in fact valid. As battle list (a) was later used by the compilers of the Official Records for designating some of the military operations that are mentioned in its headings, lists of events, and index entries, the inaccuracies in this battle list were carried over into that publication.

Battle List (b)

            From the raw data used in compiling battle list (a), a second handwritten battle list was compiled a few years later, probably in 1871. The value of battle list (b) lies in its different arrangement and inclusion of useful data that do not appear in battle list (a). However, list (b) does not include U. S. Colored Troops, as does list (a). List (b) is arranged by State and there under by arm of service, numerical designations of troop units, and dates of combats. The additional data often included casualty figures and indications of which companies or particular regiments were engaged. As States are not arranged alphabetically, it is necessary to consult the State index that precedes this battle list in this microfilm publication.

Battle List( c)

            Battle list (c) was produced in connection with the preparation of an earlier, chronologically arranged version (known as the “preliminary prints”) of the Official Records. The list is in printed form and titled Chronological List of Battles, Engagements, Etc., During the Rebellion, 1861-1865, with the Designation of Troops Engaged. Although the imprint date is 1875, printing apparently was completed around 1877 or 1878, and, in spite of its title, the list covers only the years

3. U. S. War Department, the War of the Rebellion: A compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies ed. Lt. Col. Robert N. Scott et al. (70 vols. in 127 serial parts, plus general index volume and atlas, Washington: Government Printing Office, 1880-1901).

Battle List (d)

            Battle list (d) records engagements of Regular Army troops by arm of service and there under by regiment from the time each regiment was organized through 1902. Participating companies are generally indicated for each engagement. Circumstantial evidence establishes that this typewritten list was prepared by Francis B. Heitman of the Adjutant General’s Office during the period 1891-1907. While it partly supplies the data for Regular Army troops not included in battle list (b), it does not provide casualty figures, and for this information it is necessary to consult battle list (e). Only parts of battle list (d) listing regiments for which Civil War action is shown have been filmed in this microfilm publication.

Battle List (e)

            Battle List (e) is a typed excerpt from a draft that provided data for a Regular Army battle list published in volume 2 of Francis B. Heitman’s Historical Register and Dictionary of the United States Army from its Organization, September 29, 1789 to March 2, 1903 (2 vols., Washington: Government Printing Office, 1903). Like the Historical Register, battle list (e) is arranged chronologically and gives the geographic designation of each operation and the regiment and companies engaged. Unlike the Historical Register, it covers only the years 1861-65 and includes casualty figures and the names of officers killed, wounded, or taken prisoner.

Battle List (f)

            Battle list (f) consists of selected pages from Volume 8 of the Volunteer Army Register, a War Department reference publication containing officer rosters, combat credits, and brief histories for each Civil War Volunteer regiment. The two sections of volume 8 reproduced in this microfilm publication as list (f) give for units of U. S. Colored Troops almost exactly the same data that lists (b) gives for other volunteer units. The data were presumably drawn from a now missing register of combat credits for U. S. Colored Troops apparently prepared at the same time as battle list (b). In volume 8, pages 141-319, combat designations and casualties for particular troop units are given in footnotes to rosters that are arranged by army of service and regiment. Dates of combat actions and indications of companies engaged are given in an “Index of Battles,” pages 331-342 of the volume.

Battle List (g)

            Battle list (g) is actually a chronological index of Civil War casualty records that are part of Record Group 94. The handwritten list includes the geographic designations of military engagements and shows the participation of Volunteer Union troop units. Occasional references are supplied to Regular Army participation. The battle list notes corps and regiments but not individual companies involved. Names of individuals killed or wounded are often given as well. References are provided to file numbers of pertinent casualty reports, hospital registers, and other medical records.

Battle list (h)

            Battle list (h) also refers to casualty data in Record Group 94. The handwritten list is contained in two volumes titles “Chronological list o Battles during the War of the Rebellion.” In addition to geographic designations and participating Volunteer Union troop units for each operation, it includes information concerning the disposition of the wounded—and often there is descriptive material about the engagement, such as its geographic location. Occasional references are also supplied to Regular Army participation. Entries cite the published sources or original records from which they were derived.

Battle list (i)

            Battle list (i), excerpted from The Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion, 1861-65, is titled “Chronological Summary of Engagements and Battles.” It notes volunteer troop participation and occasionally supplies references to Regular Army participation. While list (i) is similar to the engaged and Union losses, it is unique among them in its inclusion of Confederate casualty figures. A “Remarks and References” column in this battle list shows that the entries were derived primarily from published sources, including official reports of officers, State adjutant general office reports, newspaper accounts, and secondary works. Unpublished records, principally casualty lists, are also cited. An index to battles is at the end of the volume.

 

 

Clarke, Powhatan Diary, Mss. 893, 1862-1863 [Rapides Parish, Louisiana; also Arkansas] Location: Reel 4 Confederate Military Manuscript, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

Powhatan Clarke, a native of Virginia who was educated in Paris, France, was a surgeon and professor of chemistry at Louisiana State Seminary of Learning and Military Academy, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. He served as aide-de-camp for Brig. Gen. D. M. Frost. His father-in-law was Judge Henry Boyce of Ulster Plantation near Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana. Col. David French Boyd (1834-1899) served as captain of engineers on Gen. Richard Taylor’s staff beginning in 1863. An educator, Boyd taught at Louisiana State Seminary of Learning and Military Academy.

            This collection consists of one item, a diary, 1862-1863, of Powhatan Clarke. The diary records Dr. Clarke’s trips by wagon from Ulster Plantation to Camden, Arkansas, to join Gen. D. M. Frost, his impairment by rheumatism, and his return trip to Louisiana (in the hopes of conscription and a more sheltered service). His journey took him through Rapides, Grant, Natchitoches, Bienville, Webster, and Claiborne parishes. He later traveled with Judge Henry Boyce to Opelousas, St. Landry Parish, and traveled alone through Lafayette and Iberia parishes to procure salt for Ulster Plantation. Entries record distances traveled each day, expenses incurred for repairs to the wagon and food, conditions of road, and names of people met along the way, as well as mention of the salt works at Lake Bisteneau, Louisiana. Entries describe exchanged prisoners and discharged soldiers and the rental of his wagon to the Confederate States Army quartermaster at New Iberia, Louisiana, to haul lumber and build a road to Avery Island. The volume was later used by Col. David F. Boyd and contains his military and topographical notes of the area between Sicily Island, Catahoula Parish, and Waterproof, Tensas Parish, during Boyd’s service as chief of engineers on Maj. Gen. Richard Taylor’s staff in 1863.

0149                Introductory Materials. 7 frames.

0156                Diary, 1862-1863. 48 frames.

 

 

Confederates Captured at Vicksburg, Mississippi, July 4, 1863, list of 1 roll 16mm National Archives RG 109 M2072 Location: YSC Microfilm Cabinet 3, Drawer 2

On the single roll of this microfilm publication, M2072, are reproduced lists of Confederate soldiers captured at Vicksburg, Mississippi, July 4, 1863. These records are part of the War Department Collection of Confederate Records, Record Group (RG) 109, and are part of the series identified as Entry 212, Parole Rolls of Confederates, 1862-1865, in Elizabeth Bethel, Preliminary inventory of the War Department Collection of Confederate Records (Record Group 109) (National Archives, 1957; reprint, Iberian publishing Co., 1994).

            The city of Vicksburg, located on the east bank of the Mississippi River midway between Memphis, TN, and New Orleans, LA, was the site of a key Confederate river defense and the focal point of Union Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant’s operations in the west from October 1862 to July 1863. The surrender of its fortifications and a garrison of 29,500 men on July 4, 1863, was a severe psychological blow to the Confederacy and, combined with the simultaneous defeat of the Army of Northern Virginia at Gettysburg, PA, represented a manpower loss the South could ill afford.

            In 1861, Vicksburg was a commercial center and transportation hub for Mississippi and Louisiana. When the war began, Vicksburg took on an even greater significance as one of the key links between the eastern Confederacy and the Trans-Mississippi South, serving as a transit point for troops and as a port of entry for Louisiana salt, sugar, and molasses, the latter two frequently exchanged for meat for the armies. Efforts to safeguard the city became crucial in the spring of 1862 when Memphis and New Orleans fell to Federal forces. Vicksburg then remained the only railhead on the east bank of the river and, as such, provided the last direct link between the eastern and western halves of the Confederacy. Its retention also effectively blocked Federal waterborne communications down the river.

            Grant, eager to take Vicksburg and avoid a protracted siege, attacked the city’s defenses on May 19 and again three days later. Both assaults were repulsed with heavy casualties. He thus was forced to resort to a siege. Once complete, the 12-mile long Federal siege line paralleled the Confederate earthworks from an average distance of six hundred yards and was anchored at both ends on the Mississippi River. By mid-June, 77,000 men surrounded the city.

            By the end of June, the situation within Vicksburg was rapidly deteriorating. Citizens sought shelter from daily bombardments by hiding in basements or digging caves into the hillsides. Walter became scarce and bread rations were reduced. As the meat supply dwindled, mule meat was substituted for bacon.

            Only July 3, the Confederate commander, Maj. Gen. John C. Pemberton, met Grant between the lines and arranged to surrender the following day.

 

 

Confederate Military Report, Mss. 1328, 1862 [Richmond, Virginia] Location: Reel 4 Confederate Military Manuscript, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of one item, a Confederate military report, 25 July 1862. The report from Camp Totopotomoy records battles and skirmishes around Richmond, Virginia, 25 June-6 July 1862. Much of the report concerns activities of the 4th Virginia Cavalry, the Jefferson Davis Legion, Pelham’s Battery, and other units of Stuart’s Cavalry in Virginia. Descriptions of the Battle of Gaines Mill, 27 June 1862; the destruction of the White House, New Kent County, 29 June 1862; the shelling of McClellan’s army from Evelington Heights, Charles City County, 3 July 1862; and other engagements are included in the report.

0204                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0207                Military Report, 1862. 9 frames.

 

Confederate Naval and Marine personal records, 7 rolls. 16mm. National Archives RG 109 M260 Location: YSC Microfilm Cabinet 3, Drawer 5.

On the 7 rolls of this microfilm publication are reproduced records relating to persons serving in the Confederate Navy and Marine Corps. These records are in three series, as follows: (1) compiled hospital and prison records of naval and marine personnel, (2) reference cards and papers relating to naval personnel, and (3) reference cards and papers relating to marine personnel. The first series, arranged alphabetically by surname of sailor or marine, consists of cards containing abstracts of entries relating to the individual in original Union and Confederate hospital registers, prescription books, and Union prison and parole rolls; and the originals of papers, primarily from prison records, relating to the individual. The second and third series consist of reference cards and the originals of any papers relating solely to a particular sailor or marine, arranged alphabetically by surname. The reference cards indicate the rank of the sailor or marine and contain references to vessel papers, payrolls, muster rolls, and volumes in the War Department Collection of Confederate Records.

            The hospital and prison records of naval and marine personnel were compiled during the period that the military service records of Confederate soldiers were being prepared. This compilation was begun in 1903 under the direction of Brig. Gen. Fred C. Ainsworth, head of the Record and Pension Office of the War Department. Abstracts were made from documents in the War Department Collection of Confederate Records and from documents borrowed by the War Department in an effort to obtain as nearly complete service records as possible. The abstracts made from the original records were verified by a separate operation of comparison, and every conceivable precaution was taken to ensure that the abstracts were accurate. The exact date that the compilation of the series of reference cards and papers relating to naval and marine personnel was begun is not known. The work was probably performed by the Archive Office of The Adjutant General’s Office in the latter part of the 19th century.

            Some of the original documents relating to a particular individual were at some time removed from the second and third series; in some instances, however, the envelopes, which show the serviceman’s name and rank and form which the original documents were removed, were retained in the files. The documents so removed were transferred to the Navy Department before the War Department Collection of Confederate Records was accessioned by the National Archives and are now part of Record Group 45, Naval Records Collection of the Office and Naval Records and Library, in the National Archives.

            The records reproduced in this microcopy are part of a body of records in the National Archives designated as Record Group 109, War Department Collection of Confederate Records.

            Records relating to a Confederate sailor or marine may not appear in this microcopy for several reasons. First, the series containing reference cards and papers relating to naval and marine personnel are known to be incomplete. Second, the sailor or marine may not have served in a naval or marine unit. Third, he may have served under a different name or used a different spelling of his name. Fourth, proper records of his service may not have been made, or, if made, may have been lost or destroyed in the confusion that often attended the initial mobilization, subsequent military operation, or final surrender of Confederate forces. Fifth, the references to the individual in the original records may be so vague that it has not been practicable to determine his correct name or the unit in which he served.

            The originals of naval and marine muster rolls, shipping articles, clothing receipts, descriptive rolls, and some payrolls are part of Record Group 45. There is no complete index to these rolls.

            Sometimes presumed Confederate naval or marine service is shown by the records to have been service in a civilian capacity, as in the case of government employees. Evidence of such service or of having aided the Confederate cause as a civilian in some other way may sometimes be obtained from a series of records in the National Archives is known as the “Citizens file.” This series consists of Confederate documents each of which relates only to a particular civilian. They are arranged alphabetically by name of person and are not indexed. Other information about the activities of Confederate civilians is contained in a similar unindexed series of documents accumulated by Union provost marshals and known as the “Provost Marshal File.” The National Archives has still other Confederate relating to particular Confederate civilians or servicemen. The records described in this paragraph are available for examination in the National Archives by inquirers or their agents.

 

 

 

Confederate Soldiers, Register of, sailors, and citizens, who died in Federal prisons and military hospitals in the north, 1861-1865. 1 roll. 16mm. National Archives RG 92 M918 Location: Microfilm Cabinet 3, Drawer 2.

            On the single roll of this microfilm publication is reproduced a 665-page register of Confederate soldiers, sailors, and citizens who died in Federal prisons and military hospitals in the North, 1861-65. The register was compiled in 1912 in the Office of the Commissioner for Marking the Graves of Confederate Dead and is now a part of the Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, Record Group 92.

            Because of a general breakdown in prisoner exchanges late in the Civil War, many Confederate soldiers, sailors, and Citizens ultimately died in Federal prisons or military hospitals. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton reported in 1866 that according to the report of the Commissary General of Prisoners, over 26,000 deaths had occurred among rebel prisoners of war. Initially, little care was exercised in marking the graves of Confederate soldiers and sailors buried in cemeteries at or near the prisons or hospitals in which they died. Federal legislation from 1867 to 1873 provided for the burial of Union soldiers in national cemeteries and for the marking of their graves with durable headstones. There were no specific provisions in this early legislation for Confederate dead, but their graves were sometimes marked similarly to those of civilians; i.e., with a thin headstone containing the number of the grave and the name of the occupant. However, many of the non-Union graves had been marked with wooden headboards that ultimately disintegrated, although the names of the interred were often preserved in burial registers.

            Interest in caring for the graves of Confederates in the North was stimulated by President William McKinley, who advocated Federal responsibility in an address delivered at Atlanta, GA., on December 14, 1898. On June 5, 1899, Dr. Samuel E. Lewis, commander of the Charles Broadway Rouss Camp No. 1191 (District of Columbia) of the United Confederate Veterans, petitioned President McKinley on behalf of his organization for the reinterment of 264 Confederate soldiers, then buried at the National Soldiers Home and Arlington with suitably marked graves. A Federal statute of March 6, 1900 (31 Stat. 630), appropriated $2,500 or as much of that sum as necessary for the purpose. A subsequent statue of February 7, 1903 (32 Stat. 804), provided for appropriations not to exceed $250 annually for the care and improvement of the Confederate Mound at the Oak Woods Cemetery at Chicago, Ill. The act of April 28, 1904 (33 Stat. 496), provided similarly for the Confederate cemetery at Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio.

            By 1901 Confederate veterans’ organizations were advocating a uniform system of Federal care for all Confederate graves in Northern cemeteries’. Dr. Samuel E. Lewis, in a report of April 25, 1901, to Gen. John B. Gordon, Commander in Chief of the United Confederate Veterans, called for Federal action in caring for the 28,000 graves of Confederate dead in the North. Subsequently, at the Memphis, Tenn., meeting of the national organization, May 28-30, 1901, a resolution was adopted requesting that “Congress take appropriate action looking to the care and preservation of the graves of the Confederate dead now in the various cemeteries in the Northern States.”

            The bill first introduced in Congress on December 6, 1902, which subsequently became law on March 9, 1906 (34 Stat. 56), provided “for the appropriate marking of the graves of the soldiers and sailors of the Confederate Army and Navy who died in Northern prisons and were buried near the prisons where they died.” The sum of $200,000, or as much of that as needed, was appropriated to carry out the work. The legislation unauthorized and directed the Secretary of War to ascertain the location and condition of the Confederate graves, to acquire possession or control over the burial grounds, and to have prepared an accurate burial register showing the location and number of the grave and the name, company, regiment, or vessel, and State of each deceased Confederate soldier and sailor. White marble headstones inscribed with this information were to be placed at each grave. The Secretary of information was to be placed at each grave. The Secretary of War was also authorized and directed to appoint a commissioner to perform the necessary work preliminary to the actual marking of September 1910. James H. Berry was then Commissioner from October 1910 until October 1912, when the office was discontinued. Dr. Samuel E. Lewis subsequently served as Commissioner after the Office was reestablished in March 1914. The original 1906 legislation establishing the Office of the Commissioner was extended by Congressional joint resolutions approved February 26, 1908 (35 Stat. 567), February 25, 1910 (36 Stat. 875), December 23, 1910 (36 Stat. 1453), March 14, 1914 (38 Stat. 768), and April 17, 1916 (39 Stat. 52).

            The typescript register herein reproduced was compiled in accordance with the 1906 statute; the work was completed by 1912. The burial lists are generally arranged alphabetically by name of prison camp or other location where the deaths occurred. The table of contents at the beginning of the volume is similarly arranged, although a few cemetery names are also listed; appropriate page numbers are cited in each instance. The individual burial lists are arranged alphabetically by name of deceased and generally give the name, rank, company, regiment, date of death, and number and location of grave for each individual interred. However, this information in its entirety is not available for all cases. Some cemeteries, for example, did not bury the dead in numbered graves, and in some instances, regimental and company designations or dates of death are not entered in the register. A few entries are for private Confederate citizens interred in the various cemeteries and some are for unknown graves. Other entries are for bodies no longer interred in the particular cemetery under which they are listed, and these entries contain such notations as “removed,” “sent home,” and “body taken home by friends.” All the pages for the Green Lawn Cemetery in Indianapolis, Ind., have been lined through and a notation added that “Remains of above removed to lot 285, Sec. 32, Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana and reinterred as unknowns on Oct. 27, 1931.” Some of the entries contain references to explanatory notes that are at the beginning or end of the burial list.

 

 

Confederate States of America, Army. Georgia Infantry Regiment, 17th. Company E, Muster Roll. Confederate States Army Collection (C), Mss. 521, 1864 [Georgia] Location: Reel 3 Confederate Military Manuscript, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

The collection consists of one item, a muster roll, 29 February-30 April 1864, of Company E, 17th Georgia Infantry Regiment, CSA Army. The muster roll is signed by Capt. Joshua N. Titus; it records the company’s payroll and lists names and absences of company members.

0012                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0015                Muster Roll, 17th Georgia Infantry Regiment, 29

February-30 April 1864. 9 frames.

 

Confederate States of America, Army, List of Officers. Confederate States Army Collection (J), Mss. 247, 1864 [Richmond, Virginia] Location: Reel 3 Confederate Military Manuscript, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge 

            This collection consists of one item, a list of officers employed in the office of the provost marshal, Confederate States Army, Richmond, Virginia. The list, signed by provost Isaac Howell Carrington, is dated 5 April 1864.

N. B. A. related collection among the holdings of the Virginia Historical Society is Mss3C7604a, CSA Army, Department of Henrico Papers, 1861-1864, included in UPA’s Confederate military manuscripts, Series A.

0024                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0027                List of Officers, 5 April 1864. 4 frames.

 

Confederate States of America, Army. Louisiana Cavalry Regiment, 8th, Muster Rolls and Plan. Confederate States Army Collection (L), Mss. 1059, 1865 [Louisiana] Location: Reel 3 Confederate Military Manuscript, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge 

Commanded by Col. B. W. Clark, the 8th Louisiana Cavalry Brigade was part of the state troops mustered into the Confederate States Army on 26 July 1864. These troops served under Brig. Gen. Joseph L. Brent, First Louisiana Cavalry Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department.

            This collection consists of twelve items, unsigned muster rolls, ca. May 1865, listing the field, staff, and band members from companies A through I and K of the 8th Louisiana Cavalry Regiment. Included is a printed plan showing positions of officers and men in formation for dress parade.

0031                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0034                Muster Rolls and Plan, Ca. May 1865. 32 frames.

 

Confederate States of America, 1861-1865; Journal of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865 (Microfiches Volumes 1—7)

            The Journal of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865 was printed in a seven-volume set between 1904 and 1905 as Senate Document No. 234 of the U.S. Serial Set, 58th Congress, 2nd session. A Senate Resolution dated January 28, 1904, directed the secretary of war, Elihu Root, to transmit to the U.S. Senate a copy of the Journal of the Provisional Congress and of the 1st and 2nd Congresses of the Confederate States of America.

            Volume 1 contains the Journal of the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States of America, the proceedings of the Constitutional Convention in Montgomery, Alabama, and an appendix containing the Permanent Constitutions of the Confederate States. The Journals of the Senate, 1st Congress of the Confederate States of America, are found in volume 2 (1st and 2nd sessions) and volume 3 (3rd and 4th sessions). The Journals document the proceedings of the open, secret, and executive sessions of the Senate, which were held in Richmond, Virginia. The Journals of the Senate, 2nd Confederate Congress, are found in volume 4 (1st and 2nd sessions).

            The Journals of the House of Representatives of the 1st Congress of the Confederate States of America are found in volume 5 (1st and 2nd sessions) and volume 6 (3rd and 4th sessions). The Journals of the House of Representatives of the 2nd Confederate Congress are found in volume 7 (1st and 2nd sessions). The Journals document the proceeding of the House, including both open and secret sessions.

 

Confederate States of America, Army. Louisiana Infantry Regiment, 16th, Muster and Pay Rolls. Confederate States Army Collection (F), Mss. 587, 1862-1863 [Mississippi, Tennessee, and Georgia] Location: Reel 4 Confederate Military Manuscript, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

The collection consists of twenty-two items, muster and payroll, 1862-1863, of the 16th Louisiana Infantry Regiment. Items include rolls of Company D, signed by John W. Addison, March 1862-December 1863, and rolls of Company H, signed by Robert P. Oliver, July 1862-December 1863. The collection documents the companies’ service in Mississippi, Tennessee, and Georgia.

0216                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0221                Muster Rolls, 1862-1863. 112 frames.

 

 

Confederate States of America Records, 1856-1915 [Jefferson, Texas; also Alabama and Virginia] Location: Reel 11—16; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection consists of soldiers’ personal correspondence, diaries, and reminiscences; official Confederate Medical Department papers and miscellaneous papers relating to military medical matters; official documents orders, and letters relating to Confederate affairs, both civil and military; the William W. Hunter papers dealing primarily with the Confederate Navy but also containing miscellaneous military documents; Trans-Mississippi Department of the Confederacy Quartermaster’s Division papers; Cotton Bureau records; muster rolls; and fourteen Confederate service records.

0817                Introductory Materials. 11 frames.

0828                Omissions List. 2 frames.

0830                Folder 1, [Box 2C486, William W.] Hunter Papers,

[1861-1864]. 130 frames.

0960                Folder 2, [Box 2C486, William W.] Hunter Papers,

[1861-1864]. 222 frames.

 

Confederate Vessel Papers: papers pertaining to vessels involved with the Confederate States of America 32 rolls 16mm National Archives RG 109, M909. YSC Location: Cabinet 3 Drawer 6

On the 32 rolls of this microfilm publication are reproduced an index volume and papers pertaining to vessels of or involved with the Confederate States of America, “Vessel Papers:” The series consists of several thousand alphabetically arranged jacketed files, most, but not all, of which pertain to vessels that served the Confederate Government from 1861-1865. The “Vessel Papers” are a part of the War Department Collection of Confederate Records, Record Group 109.

        Most of the original papers reproduced in this microfilm publication were created by the Confederate War and Treasury Departments. After the Civil War the records were among those of the Confederacy that came into U. S. War Department custody. A number of years later, the present series of “Vessel Papers” was assembled by the Archive Office and its successor, the Confederate Archives Division, in the War Department.

        The Archive Office originated officially with a War Department order of July 21, 1865, which specified “That a Bureau be organized in the Adjutant General’s Office for the collection, safekeeping, and publication of the Rebel Archives that have come into the possession of this Government.” The office was officially designated as the “Archive Office of the War Department” by a subsequent issuance of August 23, 1865, and on August 19, 1867, it was officially rendered an intergral part of the Adjutant General’s Office. An order of July 24, 1880, directed that the Archive Office be merged into the War Records Office of the War Department, but a modification of August 10, 1880, placed it in the Record Division of the Office of the Secretary of War. The Archive Office, now designated the Confederate Archives Division, was once again placed under the Adjutant General’s Office by an order of February 7, 1888, and remained there until transferred to the War Department Record and Pension Office by an order of May 15, 1894.

          Custody by the War Department offices of the records comprising the “Vessel Papers” is indicated by stamps that appear on many of the documents. The most frequently used stamp is a large oval one reading “Record Division, Rebel Archives, War Department,” apparently a designation used by the Archive Office. A variety of smaller oval stamps can also be found, including those reading “Office of Secretary of War, Record Division,” “Adjutant General’s Office, Confederate Archives Division,” and “Confederate Archives.” Occasionally the date appears on the stamp.

           The “Vessel Papers” was one of several files created during the late 19th century to facilitate research in claims cases. Following the Civil War, Southern citizens filed claims seeking compensation for property losses allegedly inflicted by Union forces. The treasury and Justice Departments, Southern Claims Commission, Court of Claims, and congressional claims committees were involved in processing these cases, and all, upon occasion, required documentary evidence based upon the confederate records in War Department custody. If disloyalty of claimant could be established by documenting services performed for the Confederacy, the claim could then be disallowed at a great saving to the Government.

            Many of the claims submitted were from Southern vessel owners or their heirs, and the Archive Office listed 6 such cases pending before the Southern Claims Commission in 1873. The “Vessel Papers” were assembled during the following decade to facilitate references in these instances, and the present arrangement apparently was perfected before 1890. Subsequent additions, however, were made as late as the 20th century.

            The “Vessel Papers” relate to vessels involved in any way with the Confederate Government. Most of the files in the series are relatively small, containing few, and, in many instances, no original Confederate documents. Some files, however, do contain larger aggregations of papers, and a select list of these appears as appendix A to this publication. Most of the files pertain to privately owned shipping that carried passengers or freight for the Confederacy, but a number of the files also pertain to vessels of the Confederate States Navy or Government. Some files also pertain to non-Confederate shipping, including British and other foreign vessels that entered and departed from Confederate ports and Union merchant or naval vessels that either engaged in actions with Confederate ships or were captured by the Confederates. A few files do not pertain to specific vessels but to shipping companies and other miscellaneous subjects, and they are listed both in the accompanying index volume and in appendix B.

            Most of the documents in the “Vessel Papers” are dated 1861-65. Frequently encountered are vouchers and voucher abstracts pertaining to the transportation of passengers or freight for the Confederate Government. The series also includes correspondence, papers pertaining to accounts, receipts, invoices, requisitions, claims, contracts and agreements, bills of landing, passenger and crew lists, shipping articles, muster rolls and payrolls, reports of persons and articles hired, insurance policies, ships licenses, reports of the Second Auditor of the Confederate Treasury Department regarding vessel claims, accounts of proceedings in Confederate prize courts, decrees of condemnation and sale, and lists of foreign vessels entering and leaving Confederate ports. In an atypical instance, the file for the cruiser C. S. S. Alabama includes original plans drafted by the Laird Company in Great Britain, which constructed the vessel.

               Some of the documents in the “Vessel Papers” predate or postdate the Civil War. Most of the earlier items pertain to vessels operating before 1861, which later served the Confederacy or were captured by Confederate forces. Post-civil War documents generally pertain to claims actions instituted from the 1870’s to 1890’s and include copies of congressional bills relating to vessel claims, House of Representatives and Senate documents, and research compilations by the Archive Office and the Confederate Archives Division.

               Many of the files constituting the “Vessel Papers” contain references prepared by the Archive Office and the Confederate Archives Division. In some instances the information appears on the file jackets, but usually on cards placed within. There are some cross-references to the other files reproduced in this microfilm publication. The citations include references to chaptered and numbered book records; letters received by the Confederate Secretary of War, the Adjutant and Inspector General, and the Quartermaster General; vouchers among the papers relating to citizens or business firms (“Citizens File”); payrolls for civilian and slave labor; letters received by military commands; returns of port collectors; military inspection reports; sequestration papers; and other series. There are also references to the published War and Navy Department compilations The War of the Rebellion: A compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies (1881-1901) and The War of the Rebellion, a compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies (1894-1922). Frequently, files consist solely of reference cards (or jackets containing the information) and no original papers.

 

  

Crescent Regiment Descriptive List, Confederate States Army Collection, Mss. 1908, 1862 [Camp Bisland, Bayou Teche, Louisiana] Location: Reel 3 and 21 Confederate Military Manuscript, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

The 24th Louisiana Infantry Regiment was activated in early 1862. After several engagements, the unit was garrisoned at Camp Bisland, near Bayou Teche, later 1862. Company K of the 24th Regiment was commanded by Capt. Andrew D. Lewis during most of 1862 and 1863. During his absences, 1st Lt. H. S. Losee was the senior officer. The 24th Regiment merged with the 11th and 12th Louisiana Infantry Battalions in July 1863 to form the Consolidated Crescent Regiment.

            This collection consists of one item, a descriptive list, 26 November 1862, of the Crescent Regiment, created at Camp Bisland and signed by 1st Lt. H. S. Losee. Entitled “Descriptive List of Cap. Lewis’ Company K, Crescent Regiment,” the list contains names and descriptions of twenty-one Confederate soldiers, including rank, age, eye and hair color, complexion, height, place of birth, civilian occupation, and enlistment information.

0006                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0010                Crescent Regiment Descriptive List, 26 November

1862. 2 frames.

 

 

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D

Dailey, Henry W. Papers, 1845-1950 [Bexar County, Goliad County, Hays County, Karnes County, Kenedy, and San Antonio, Texas] Location: reel 16 & 17; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            These materials, which were collected or written by Dailey (born 1879), concern the history of Karnes County and include land records, pioneer reminiscences, photographs, maps, automobile registrations, and school rosters. Also included are Civil War muster rolls, quartermaster records, and a veterans’ roster; a scrapbook concerning Gregorio Cortez; and correspondence of Caleb J. Church (died 1890), teacher in New Braunfels and Karnes County.

0503                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0507                Karnes County Schools: Books, Pamphlets,

Historical Narrative, Photographs, Clippings, Enrollment Lists. 278 frames.

0785                Karnes County Deed Records. 25 frames.

0810                Correspondence, 1936, and Muster Rolls. 16

frames.

0826                Carlos Martinez Abstract and Application. 86

frames.

0912                Caleb J. Church Correspondence, 1845-1890. 23

frames.

0935                Trip of Dailey and Blaise to Stribbling Crossing.

11 frames.

0946                Random Notes on Caesar Bazor Story. 15 frames.

0961                Civil War Data. 1 frame.

0962                A Tale of Men Who knew Not Fear-by Gertrude

Harris. 9 frames.

0971                Requisitions. 7 frames.

0978                Kenedy, Texas, Data. 1 frame.

0979                County Assessor’s Abstract of Kenedy, Texas, as

of January 1, 1888, and Succeeding Years. 38 frames.

1017                Early Historical Background of Kenedy, Texas. 98 frames.

1115                Kenedy Lodge. 9 frames.

1124                Original Kenedy-Nichols Town Site. 3 frames.

1127                A Historical Review of the Post Office at Kenedy,

Texas. 31 frames.

1158                The Kenedy Advance. 6 frames.

1164                Since the Coming of the Railroad. 6 frames.

1170                Automobile Register-Karnes City. 12 frames.

1182                Eastern Star. 5 frames.

1187                Excerpts from the Trail Drivers of Texas. 68

frames.

1255                “The Bonnie Blue Flag.” 4 frames.

1259                Religious Development. 17 frames.

1276                Scrapbook Material. 4 frames.

Reel 17

0003                Scrapbook [Gregorio Cortez]. 71 frames.

0074                Maps. 15 frames.

0089                [Untitled Folder-Muster Rolls]. 30 frames.

0119                Photographs of Persons and Places. 26 frames.

0145                [Untitled Folder-Muster Rolls]. 27 frames.

 

 

Dashiell, Jeremiah Yellott Papers, 1848-1906 [Austin, Houston, San Antonio, and Santa Rita, Texas] Location: Reel 17; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection comprises personal and family papers of Dashiell (1804-1888), physician, Confederate soldier, and editor of the San Antonio Herald. It also contains material relating to the military and engineering careers of Dashiell’s son-in-law, William T. Mechling, as U.S. Army and Confederate soldier and as civil engineer in Central American road and railway constructions (1867-1873). Included are legal papers, diaries (1856-1858), account and memorandum books, a scrapbook, newspaper clippings, and a sermon.

0172                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0175                Omissions List. 2 frames.

0177                Correspondence, 1860-1880. 241 frames.

0418                Biography. 13 frames.

0431                Subcollection: William Thomas Mechling (son-in

law)- Diary, April 1864, Pleasant Hill. 15 frames.

0446                Subcollection: William Thomas Mechling (son-in

law)- Military Papers, 1861-1864. 79 frames.

0525                [Untitled Folder-Miscellaneous]. 13 frames.

 

DeClouet, Alexandre and Family Papers, 1787-1905, St. Martin Parish, Louisiana; Location: Reel 5 and 6; Records of Southern Plantations, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of financial records, legal documents, political materials, correspondence, diaries, memorandum books, and time books of Alexandre DeClouet and his family. Alexandre DeClouet owned and operated several plantations in St. Martin Parish, served in the Confederate Congress, and after the Civil War was active in the White League, a semi-military group that opposed civil and political rights for African Americans. Several items in the collection pertain to DeClouet’s political interests and his association with the White League. For example, in the first of the political materials folders (Reel 5, Frame 0113), there is an “Address to the Citizens of St. Martin” and a set of resolutions passed at a White League meeting. One item of correspondence (Reel 5, Frame 0151) is a request for DeClouet to address members of The White League. Several diary entries for 1868 also pertain to DeClouet’s white supremacist views. For example, an October 15, 1868, entry describes a barbecue and political rally held by African Americans. DeClouet describes the participants as “monkies” and summarizes the content of the speeches in a highly derogatory tone.

            Beyond DeClouet’s political involvement, this collection contains important detail about the operation of sugar plantations during the Reconstruction period. Diary entries include discussions of agricultural operations on DeClouet’s plantations, lists of house servants and field hands, frequent mention of weather conditions, work regimes, and comments about DeClouet’s activities beyond the plantation, such as social gatherings and church attendance. The collection concludes with a series of time books for 1869 and 1877—1884. These time books record the names of laborers, total days worked, the daily wage rate, and the total amount paid by DeClouet to each laborer. The Alexandre DeClouet and Family Papers begin at Frame 0001 of reel 5 and continue through Frame 0422 of Reel 6. A one-item collection of one letter by DeClouet follows, beginning at Frame 0423 of Reel 6.

0001                Introductory Materials. 2 frames.

0003                Financial-Ledger Sheets, 1880 and 1886-1860. 21

Frames.

0024                Financial-Joseph Alexandre Declouet, 1794.

Frames.

0026                Financial-Receipts, Accounts : Alexandre E.

Declouet, 1838-1888. 7 frames.

0033                Financial-Receipts, Accounts: Paul L. DeClouet,

1870-1889. 9 frames.

0042                Financial-Receipts, Accounts: Anna St. Claire,

1888-1893. 11 frames.

0053                Financial-Agricultural Tallies and Accounts, Paul                  L. DeClouet, 1880-1905. 15 frames.

0068                Financial-Plantation Management, [1828], 1877

1900, and Undated. 7 frames.

0075                Legal-Plantation Management, 1795 and 1886

1887. 9 frames.

0084                Legal-Visas, Alexandre E. DeClouet, 1832-1833. 5

frames.

0089                Legal-Roman Family, Purchase of Dryades

Market, 1868. 8 frames.

0097                Legal-Testamentary, Adrien Dumartrait, 1855

1856. 11 frames.

0108                Legal-Testamentary, Dr. Nue Betournage, 1877

1888 and Undated. 5 frames.

0113                Political-Addresses, Resolutions, 1872 and 1874.

25 frames.

0138                Political-Election Materials, 1867-1878 and

Undated. 11 frames.

0149                Correspondence-to Etienne Chevalier DeClouet,

1787. 2 frames.

0151                Correspondence-to Alexandre E. DeClouet, 1861

1884. 10 frames.

0161                Personal, Undated, 1800s. 7 frames.

0168                Newspaper Clippings, 1887 and Undated, 1800s.

5 frames.

0173                Volume 1, Diary, 1866. 65 frames.

 

 

DeClouet, Alexandre Letter, 1861 St. Martin Parish, Louisiana; Location: Reel 6, Records of Southern Plantations, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of a letter written by Alexandre DeClouet from Montgomery, Alabama, to C. G. Memenger, secretary of the treasury for the Confederate States of America. The letter recommends W. H. S. Taylor for a position in the Treasury Department.

0423                Alexandre DeClouet Letter, 1861. 4 frames.

                        Major Topic: Confederate States of America,

                        Treasury Department.

 

Delmer, Alexander Telegram, Mss. 3271, 1865 [Washington, D.C.].  Location:  Reel 4A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of one item, a telegram, 1 June 1865, from war correspondent Alexander Delmer to the New Orleans Times.  The telegram describes the circumstances of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, the persons involved, and the murder trial.  It relates Jefferson Davis’s comments on the murder.

0333                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0337                Telegram, 1865. 4 frames.

 

Devereux, John G. Papers, 1791-1890, Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana.  Location:  Reel 14, Antebellum Southern Plantations. 

            John G. Devereux was a hardware merchant and banker of New Orleans, Louisiana and a Confederate veteran.  Stephen Van Wickle was sheriff of Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana, ca 1819-1835, and business and legal agent for Valerien Ledoux (d. 1853), a Pointe Coupee sugar planter.  In 1835, J. C. Van Wickle, a sugar planter and possibly Stephen’s son, took over the position of sheriff, as well as the management of the Ledoux estate.  Despite being named for John G. Devereux, this collection documents little of his personal, business, or military life.  Better documented in the papers are the activities of Stephen and J. C. Van Wickle.  No connection between the Van Wickle and John G. Devereux is known.

            The collection contains military and business papers of John G. Devereux, and correspondence and financial and legal papers of Stephen and J.C. Van Wickle.  An account book and other volumes from Wexford and Dublin, Ireland, seem to belong to John Devereux’s father.  Devereux’s Civil War records chiefly relate to the Siege of Vicksburg and consist of military correspondence, including letters from Ulysses S. Grant; muster rolls; items relating to Confederate prisoners; a list of slaves used as laborers; and other items.  Business papers relate chiefly to Devereux’s banking career.  Financial and legal materials of the Van Wickles comprise sheriff’s plantation, personal, and merchant accounts, and include account books, deeds, warrants, judgments, and court orders.  An 1842 bill of sale for slaves and a list of slaves are included.  Miscellaneous items of interest are a transcription of a speech by Louisiana governor Henry W. Allen, 1863; a ledger of a cotton press and cotton press association, presumably in Pointe Coupee Parish, 1880-1883; and a biographical sketch of Martin Luther Smith.

            The extensive account books and papers the Van Wickles kept while filling the office of sheriff of Pointe Coupee Parish provide an excellent opportunity for examining the tax and legal structure of the parish.  They also offer a good source of information on land and financial disputes on the Louisiana frontier.  Plantation accounts kept by J.C. Van Wickle, both for himself and Valerien Ledoux, offer insight into sugar planting and financial relationships in Pointe Coupee Parish.

Biographical Note:

            John G. Devereux (fl. 1856-1890) was a merchant and banker of New Orleans, Louisiana, and a Confederate veteran.  He may have been the son of John Devereux (fl. 1822), a Dublin merchant and shipper.  Between at least 1856 and 1859, the younger Devereux operated a hardware business in New Orleans, supplying local planters, businesses, and institutions with metalwork, tools, and plumbing supplies.  With the outbreak of war, Devereux entered the Louisiana Artillery and assumed the rank of lieutenant.  Upon his promotion to major, he became assistant adjutant general to Major General Martin Luther Smith (1819-1866), commander of the Confederate 3rd Brigade.  After the war, Devereux served as cashier of the Southern Bank and as administrator of the Charity Hospital of New Orleans.  One document shows that he served as executor of the estate of Thomas Jefferson Cooley in 1887.  He married Sarah P. Chilton (d. 1870) in 1867.

            Stephen Van Wickle was sheriff of Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana, from around 1819 until 1835.  He also served as a business and legal agent for Valerien Ledoux (d. 1853), a Pointe Coupee sugar planter.  In 1835 J. C. Van Wickle, possibly Stephen’s son, took over the position of sheriff, as well as the management of the Ledoux estate.  Evidence suggests that he was also himself a sugar planter.

Omissions

            A list of omissions from the John G. Devereux Papers is provided on reel 14, frame 1035, and includes Subseries 3.2, Mercantile Accounts and Related Volumes, 1822-1883; Series 4, Civil War Records, 1861-1865 and Undated; and Series 5, Other Papers, 1859-1890 and Undated.

0547                Introductory Materials. 16 frames.

Series 1: Subseries 1.1: 1791-1848

0563                Description of Subseries 1.1. 1 frame.

0564                Folder 1, 1791, 1827, 1829, 1833, 1841-1842,

1848. 28 frames.

Subseries 1.2: 1888, 1890, and Undated

0592                Description of Subseries 1.2. 1 frame.

0593                Folder 2, 1888, 1890, and Undated. 7 frames.

Series 2: Subseries 2.1

0600                Description of Subseries 2.1. 1 frame.

0601                Folder 3, 1811-1836. 63 frames.

0664                Folder 4, 1837-1850. 56 frames.

Subseries 2.2

0720                Description of Subseries 2.2. 1 frame.

0721                Folder 5, 1865, 1870, 1887, and Undated. 12

frames.

Series 3: Subseries 3.1

0733                Description of Subseries 3.1. 1 frame.

0734                Folder 6, Volume 1, J. C. Van Wickle for Ledoux,

Memorandum Book, 1841-1845. 12 frames.

0746                Folder 7, Volume S-2, Stephen Van Wickle and J.

C. Van Wickle, Sheriff’s Fee Book, 1819-1870. 133 frames.

0879                Folder 8, Enclosures from Volume S-2, 1820

1870. 46 frames.

0925                Folder 9, Volume 3, Valerien Ledoux and J. C. Van

Wickle, Account Book, 1832-1874. 31 frames.

0957                Folder 10, Volume 4, Stephen Van wickle and J. C.

Van Wickle, Account Book, 1832-1874. 31 frames.

0998                Folder 11, Enclosures from Volume 4, 1832-1874.

9 frames.

1007                Folder 12, Volume 5, Valerien Ledoux and J. C.

Van Wickle, Account Book, 1849-1883. 28 frames.

Omissions

1035                List of Omissions from the John G. Devereux

Papers. 1 frame.

 

Devine, Thomas Jefferson Papers, 1861-1867 [Houston, LaGrange, and San Antonio, Texas; also Louisiana, District of Columbia, and Mexico] Location: Reel 17; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            The papers of Thomas J. Devine (1820-1890), lawyer and statesman, pertain to his appointment as district judge, his work as a member of the Texas Committee of Public Safety (1861), his work as Confederate States judge including the confiscation action of Confederate States of America versus Unionists John Twohig and J. D. Seaton, and his interest in the Board of Trade of Eagle Pass, Texas (1890). Included are five manuscript documents, an envelope, and a typescript volume of correspondence and military and legal papers. Correspondents include Confederate Generals David E. Twiggs, Ben McCullough, Hamilton P. Bee, and Edmund Kirby Smith; Confederate President Jefferson Davis; and U.S. Secretary of State William H. Seward.

0538                Introductory Materials. 6 frames.

0544                Legal Documents, 1861-1862. 11 frames.

0555                Letters, 1861-1867. 73 frames.

0628                Correspondence, 1890. 2 frames.

 

Dickson, Joseph J. Muster Roll, 1861 [Lamar County, Texas] Location: Reel 17; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin  

Muster roll of Company F, Ninth Regiment, Texas Infantry, Confederate States Army, enrolled in Lamar County, 1861, by Colonel Maxey and commanded by Captain Dickson.

0630                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0633                Muster Roll, Company F, [Ninth] Texas Infantry

Regiment, 1861. 7 frames.

 

Dixon, George M. Papers, Mss. 2616, 1861-1863 [Union Parish, Louisiana; also Mississippi].  Location:  Reel 4A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            George M. Dixon was a merchant of Downsville, Union Parish, Louisiana.  He served as a sergeant in the Louisiana Infantry, 12th Regiment.

            This collection consists of eight items, papers, 1861-1865, of George M. Dixon.  Items include articles of agreement and letters of George M. Dixon to his sister, addressed to A. E. Walworth, Downsville, Louisiana.  The letters from a Confederate soldier describe campaigns in Mississippi and Louisiana, including the battles of Vicksburg and Port Hudson.

0341                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0345                Papers, 1861-1865. 18 frames.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dixon, William Y. Papers, Mss. 3423, 1860-1905 [East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana; also Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia].  Location:  Reel 4A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge 

            William Y. Dixon (1843-1874), son of Methodist minister Thomas F. Dixon (1818-1906), was a student at Centenary College, Jackson, Louisiana, before and after the Civil War.  He was a soldier in the Confederate army, serving in Louisiana, Alabama, and Georgia.  He became a schoolteacher in Columbia, Caldwell Parish, Louisiana, after the war.  His brother, John Wesley Dixon, also served in the Confederate Army.

            This collection consists of fourteen items and nine manuscript volumes, 1860-1905 (bulk 1860-1874), of William Y. Dixon.  Items, 1863-1899 and 1905, include steamboat schedules, 1872-1874; a biographical sketch of John Wesley Dixon, 1864; and photographs of Centenary College, undated.  Volumes included on the microfilm consist of four diaries, 1860-1871, recording Dixon’s experiences during the Civil War, and including descriptions of battles at Baton Rouge, August 1862; Vicksburg, Mississippi, 1862; and Port Hudson, Louisiana, 1863, and lists of deaths in battles.  Topics covered by the diaries include daily activities in army camps, 1860-1864; transportation of troops by steamboats, 1863; diseases among soldiers and civilians, 1860-1864; and the involvement of African American Federal soldiers in fighting at Port Hudson.

            A list of omissions from William Y. Dixon Papers, Mss. 3423, 1860-1905, is provided on Reel 4, Frame 0622.  Omissions consist of Volumes 5-9.  Omitted volumes include two composition books, 1866 and 1867-1871, documenting Dixon’s work as a student at Centenary College; an account book, 1870-1873, and a record book, 1872-1877, recording financial information; and a letter book, 1872-1873, recording correspondence received by Dixon.

0363                Introductory Materials. 12 frames.

0375                Papers, 1863-1899, 1905, and Undated. 19

frames.

0394                Volume 1, William Y. Dixon, Diary, 1860-1863. 90

frames.

0484                Volume 2, William Y. Dixon, Diary, 1863-1864. 17

frames.

0501                Volume 3, William Y. Dixon, Diary, 1867-1870. 61

frames.

0562                Volume 4, William Y. Dixon, Diary, 1870-1871. 60

frames.

0622                List of Omissions from William Y. Dixon Papers,

Mss. 343, 1860-1905. 1 frame.

 

Doke, Fielding Yeager Papers, Mss. 2215, 1849-1910 [Missouri, Arkansas, Georgia, and Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 4A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Fielding Yeager Doke was a Confederate captain in Company F of the 9th Missouri Regiment, Trans-Mississippi Department.  He served primarily in Louisiana and Arkansas and was assigned to a board for the inspection of beef for the Confederate army, 1864.  Doke owned land in Kasse, Limestone County, Texas, and had a brother, Thomas, in Missouri.

            This collection consists of fifty-four items, papers, 1849-1910 (bulk 1860-1868), of Fielding Yeager Doke.  Items include letters from family concerning home life and the departure of Missouri youths to California, 1864; letters from fellow soldiers concerning the Atlanta campaign, skirmishes, and deaths of Missouri natives, 1864; and letters from friends, 1865, 1905, and 1910.  Military papers include orders of Doke and other soldiers, receipts for damaged ordnance, and an inquiry concerning an absence without leave.  Financial papers include a daily statement of gold received by Bill McKana and brother for prospecting, 1849; a statement of account with a merchant, 1868; a promissory note, 1877; and documents of land sales.  Printed items include broadsides, some published by the Young Men’s Secession Association, 1860-1865; three items concerning a benefit performance for Louisiana soldiers, 1865; and scattered issues of The Countryman, a Turnwold,

Georgia, newspaper, September-December 1862.

0623                Introductory Materials. 10 frames.

0633                Folder 1, Papers, August 1849. 2 frames.

0635                Folder 2, Papers, 1860-1865. 17 frames.

0652                Folder 3, Papers, 1863-1865. 15 frames.

0667                Folder 4, The Countryman, Turnwold, Georgia,

September- December 1862. 72 frames.

0739                Folder 5, Papers, 1865-1910. 24 frames.

0763                Folder 6, Business Cards, Undated. 3 frames.

 

Duncan, Green C. Papers, 1850-1910 [Bardstown, Bloomfield, and Danville, Kentucky; also Ohio and Texas] Location: Reel 17 & 18; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

These papers relate to the career of Duncan (1841-1910), farmer, cattleman, and legislator, including his experience as a Confederate soldier and as a prisoner of war on Johnson’s Island, Ohio; his settlement in Texas; his service in the twenty-second Texas Legislature; and his farm in Wharton County. Included are correspondence, diaries, memorandum books, financial records, land records, newspaper clippings, the plantation records of John B. Walker, and the diary of William F. L. Alexander.

0640                Introductory materials. 6 frames.

0646                Account Book, 1871-1888. 51 frames.

0697                Account Book, 1879-1894. 103 frames.

0800                Account Book, 1894-1900. 82 frames.

0882                Account Book, 1898-1901. 77 frames.

0959                Correspondence, 1853-1865. 188 frames.

Reel 18

0003                Correspondence, 1866-1868. 166 frames.

0169                Correspondence, 1869-1870. 90 frames.

0259                Correspondence, 1871-1873. 111 frames.

0370                Correspondence, 1891 and 1907. 21 frames.

0391                Correspondence, Undated. 28 frames.

0419                Diaries, 1850-1851, 1865, and 1880. 83 frames.

0502                Land Papers, 1881, 1883, and Undated. 9 frames.

0511                Financial Papers, 1867-1901. 32 frames.

0543                Memorandum Books, 1877-1910. 54 frames.

0597                Duncan Family History, 1902. 26 frames.

0623                Duncan, Green Caudron, Diary, 1880. 35 frames.

0658                Alexander, William F. L. Diary, 1875-1878. 122

frames.

0780                Walker, John B., Plantation Book, 1861-1864. 37

frames.

0817                [Untitled Folder-Miscellaneous]. 6 frames.

 

 

Durnin, James and John Papers, Mss. 697, 1849-1881 [St. Helena Parish, Louisiana; also Mississippi].  Location:  Reel 4A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            James and John Durnin lived in St. Helena Parish, Louisiana, and served in the Confederate army in Louisiana and Mississippi.

            This collection consists of twenty-four items and seven volumes, papers, 1849-1881, of James and John Durnin.  Papers include correspondence, bills, accounts, clippings, sheet music, and miscellaneous items documenting the personal, financial, and military activities of the Durnin family.  Correspondence includes Civil War letters by James Durnin describing mustering into the Confederate army at New Orleans, September 1861; Camp Chalmette and the Confederate fortifications, December 1861; and fighting from camp Woodville, Mississippi, between the towns of Clinton and Liberty, September 1864.  A letter by John Durnin describes an army camp at Baton Rouge and the Federal troops’ efforts to find sugar in a wharf near Baton Rouge, September 1862.  Papers also include an order for James Durnin to report to Capt. Holmes at Mobile, Alabama, and an oath to defend the Constitution signed by John Durnin.

            A list of Omissions from James and John Durnin Papers, Mss. 697, 1849-1881, is provided on Reel 4, Frame 0825. Omissions consist of Seven volumes.

0766                Introductory Materials. 13 frames.

0779                Papers, 1849-1888. 46 frames.

0825                List of Omissions from James and John Durnin Papers, Mss. 697, 1849-1881. 1 frame.

 

 

Durning, M. W. Barber and C. S.; Diary, 1864 [Arkansas and Louisiana] Location: Reel 10; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            Daily account of camp life and troop movements kept by Union Corporal Barber (1843-1864) from January 1, 1864, through April 7, 1864. After Barber’s death at Sabine Cross Roads, Louisiana, the account is resumed by Confederate Private Durning, who kept it from April 9, 1864, through December 31, 1864.

0923                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0926                Omissions List. 1 frame.

0927                Diary. 72 frames.

 

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E

Edwards, Peyton Forbes Family Papers, 1847-1947 [El Paso, Nacogdoches, and Rusk Counties, Texas; also Louisiana] Location: Reel 18; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            These papers relate to the family and career of Edwards (1844-1918), soldier, attorney, judge, and politician. Included are family correspondence during his service in Company J of the 17th Texas Cavalry in the Civil War, legal papers dealing with his law practice in Nacogdoches, the constitution and by-laws of the Dialectic Society of Nacogdoches College, and the genealogical research of his daughter, Leila Edwards Akin. Materials include certificates, land grants, speeches, a plat map, photographs, postcards, a diary, tax receipts, correspondence, newspaper clippings, legal papers, notes, memoranda, and architectural sketches.

0823                Introductory Materials. 6 frames.

0829                Omissions List. 1 frame.

0830                Civil War Papers, Quartermaster and Ordnance in

the Confederate Army, 1861-1866. 47 frames.

 

Ellis, E. John and Thomas C. W. Family Papers, Mss. 136, 1829-1936. [Amite, Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana; also Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Ohio]  Location:  Reels 21A and 22A,  Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Ezekiel John Ellis and Thomas Cargill Warner Ellis were sons of Ezekiel Parke Ellis, a judge and state legislator from Amite, Louisiana.  E. John and Thomas C. W. were practicing attorneys who were active in Louisiana politics.  During the Civil War, E. John Ellis served as captain in the St. Helena Rebels, Company F, 16th Louisiana Infantry Regiment, Confederate States Army.  He was captured at Missionary Ridge, Tennessee, in 1863 and imprisoned at Johnson’s Island Prison, Sandusky Bay, Ohio.  Thomas C. W. Ellis enlisted in the Confederate States Army in 1862 and served as a captain in the 18th Louisiana Cavalry Battalion.  After the Civil War, Thomas was elected to the Louisiana State Senate and served until 1868. E. John Ellis entered into law practice in 1867 and in 1874 was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives.  The following year, he and Thomas formed a law partnership with John McEnery, practicing in New Orleans.  Thomas was appointed judge of the Civil District Court of New Orleans in 1888, and in 1898 Judge Ellis was elected to the chair of Admiralty and International Law at Tulane University in New Orleans.

            This collection consists of papers, 1829-1936 (bulk 1870-1920), of E. John and Thomas C. W. Ellis and family.  Papers consist of correspondence, legal documents, pamphlets, newspaper clippings, and business papers of three generations of the Ezekiel Parke Ellis family of southeastern Louisiana.  Politics occupy a large portion of the discussions in the correspondence of 1860-1861.  Civil War correspondence, 1861-1865, of E. John Ellis includes letters written from various camps in Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Georgia, as well as those from Johnson’s Island Prison, Ohio.  Letters of 1865-1866 concern family matters, travel, and Reconstruction politics.

            A list of omissions from E. John and Thomas C. W. Ellis Family Papers, Mss. 136, 1829-1936, is provided on Reel 22, Frame 0190.  Omissions consist of Folders 1-7, 1829-1859; Folders 15-end, 1867-1936; and Volumes 1-72.

0821                Introductory Materials. 10 frames.

0831                Folder 8, Papers, 1860. 42 frames.

0873                Folder 9, Papers, 1861. 42 frames.

0915                Folder 10, papers, 1862. 110 frames.

1025                Folder 11, Papers, 1863. 85 frames.

Reel 22

0001                Folder 12, Papers, 1863. 68 frames.

0069                Folder 13, 1863. 42 frames.

0110                Folder 14, Papers, 1863. 80 frames.

0190                List of Omissions from E. John and Thomas C. W.

Ellis Family Papers, Mss. 136, 1829-1936. 1 frame.

 

 

 

Ellis, E.P. and Family Papers, Mss. 663, 1812-1914 [West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana; also Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi and Tennessee].  Location:  Reel 5A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Ezekiel Park Ellis (1807-1884) of Amite, Louisiana, was a judge and a member of the Louisiana legislature. He was married to Tabitha Emily Warner, daughter of Louisiana judge Thomas Cargill Warner.  His sons, all lawyers, were Thomas C. W. Ellis, Ezekiel John Ellis, and Stephen Dudley Ellis.  They attended Centenary College in Jackson, Louisiana, and served in the Confederate army.

            This collection consists of 180 items and five printed volumes, papers, 1812-1914, of E.P. Ellis and family.  The microfilmed portion of the collection consists of bound  typewritten copies of letters, 1812 and 1831-1914.  Letters of E. P. Ellis are addressed to his wife during travel to various courthouses in the Florida parishes of Louisiana.  Letters of the 1850s are chiefly by E. John Ellis and Thomas C. W. Ellis and are addressed from Centenary College, Jackson, Louisiana, and the Law School of the University of Louisiana at New Orleans.  The bulk of the correspondence consists of Civil War letters from E. John Ellis while he was captain of the 16th Louisiana Infantry Regiment, serving in Mississippi, Georgia, Tennessee and Kentucky.  Several letters were written from Johnson’s Island Prison, Sandusky, Ohio.  A few letters from Stephen D. Ellis, also in the 16th Louisiana Infantry, are included.  Postwar letters are mainly written by Thomas C. W. Ellis.  Also included are typescripts of a few slave bills of sale, invitations, certificates, newspaper clippings, and memoranda concerning members of the Ellis family.

N.B.  A related collection is E. John and Thomas C. W. Ellis Family Papers, Mss. 136, 1829-1936, included, in part, on Reels 21-22 of this edition.

0001                Introductory Materials. 16 frames.

0017                Bound Transcript of Letters, 1812 and 1831

1904. 144 frames.

0161                List of Omissions from E. P. Ellis and Family

Papers, Mss. 663, 1812-1914. 1 frame. [No Frames 0162-0235.]

 

Ellis, Volney Letters, 1860-1864 [Halletsville, Texas; also Arkansas and Louisiana] Location: Reel 25; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection contains letters by Ellis to his wife, Mary, concerning the maintenance of the Ellis household and his business as an attorney in Halletsville, Texas, with the bulk of the material relating to experiences in Louisiana and Arkansas during the Civil War.

0563                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0567                [Untitled Folder-Correspondence, 1860-1864].

127 frames.

 

Ellis, William H. Papers, Mss. 2274, 1839-1900 [New Orleans, Louisiana; also Virginia and Georgia].  Location:  Reel 5A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            William H. Ellis (1839-1892), a postal worker of New Orleans, Louisiana, was a soldier in the New Orleans Washington Artillery unit of the Confederate States Army of Northern Virginia and was active in Confederate veterans affairs after the war.  He conducted business in New Orleans and had interests in the cotton market in the 1880s.

            This collection consists of 191 items and eight volumes, papers, 1839-1900, of William H. Ellis and family.  Letters; financial, personal, and political papers; and military documents reflect Ellis’s activities in business in New Orleans and as a soldier in the Washington Artillery.  Financial papers include slave bills of sale; bank drafts and notes; documents of land ownership, including the sale of land in St. Helena Parish; promissory notes; and receipts for court costs, furnishings, interest payments, wages, and statements of account.  Military items include orders, passes, prisoner parole forms, and receipts of pay and clothing, 1864-1865.  Political papers include speeches, 1856, and 1857, an amnesty oath, 1865, and a voter’s registration certificate, 1876.  Three diaries, 1860-1865, include entries  describing office work and social life in New Orleans, 1860; Camp Victory and Camp Hollins near the battleground of Bull Run, January 1862; the camp mess and cooking in camps, 1862; the Battle of Chickahominy, near Richmond, Virginia, 1862; Ellis’s capture and parole at Athens, Georgia, May-August 1862, and the death of Abraham Lincoln.  The diaries contain some addresses and cash entries recording pay and expenses.  A memorandum book, 1863-1864, contains poems and entries concerning military duties. 

            A list of omissions from William H. Ellis Papers, Mss. 2274, 1839-1900, is provided on Reel 5, Frame 0581.  Omissions consist of Folder 10, Printed Items, 1886 and Undated, including three pamphlets concerning religious matters in New Orleans.

0236                Introductory materials. 18 frames.

0254                Folder 1, Papers, 1839-1849. 7 frames.

0261                Folder 2, Bank Drafts and Notes, 1847-1866. 25

frames.

0286                Folder 3, papers, 1850-1861. 60 frames.

0346                Folder 4, Papers, 1862-1865. 15 frames.

0361                Folder 5, Papers, 1866-1891. 36 frames.

0397                Folder 6, Papers, Undated. 6 frames.

0401                Folder 7, Poems, Undated. 6 frames.

0407                Folder 8, Cards, 1885 and Undated. 2 frames.

0409                Folder 9, Newspaper Clippings, 1860-1890. 8

frames.

0417                Folder 11, United Confederate Veterans Badges,

1890 and Undated. 2 frames.

0419                Folder 12, Hood Relief Committee Picture, 1879.

3 frames.

0422                Folder 13, E. F. Keplinger Photograph, 1890. 3

frames.

0425                Folder 14, William H. Ellis Photographs, Undated.

2 frames.

0427                Folder 15, Confederate Photographs, Undated. 2

frames.

0429                Folder 16, C. Taney Keplinger Photograph,

Undated. 2 frames.

0431                Folder 17, Unidentified Photograph, Undated 2

frames.

0433                Folder 18, Album of Richmond Views, 1890. 8

frames.

0441                Volume 1, Diary, 1860 and 1864-1865. 66 frames.

0507                Volume 2, Diary, 1862 and 1865. 34 frames.

0541                Volume 3, Diary, 1863 and 1865. 17 frames.

0558                Volume 4, Memorandum Book, 1863-1864. 15

frames.

0573                Volume 5, New Testament, 1860-1863. 8 frames.

0581                List of Omissions from William H. Ellis Papers,

Mss 2274, 1839-1900. 1 frame.

 

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F

Farrow, Sam W. Paper, 1862-1865 [Marion and Panola Counties, Texas; also Arkansas and Louisiana] Location: Reel 18; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection consists of Farrow’s correspondence during the Civil War.

0877                Introductory Material. 3 frames.

0880                Correspondence, November 7, 1852—February 4,

1865, and Undated.  196 frames.

1076                [Untitled Folder-Miscellaneous Correspondence].

11 frames.

1087                Receipts, November 19, 1860. 2 frames.

 

 

 

Faulkner, Lee and Faulkner, Johnaphene S. (Wilson) Papers, 1858-1866 [Columbus, Galveston, Prairie Home, and Ratcliff Place, Texas; also Arkansas and Mississippi] Location: Reel 19; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection consists of correspondence and reminiscences of Lee and Johnaphene Faulkner.

0001                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0005                Omissions List. 1 frame.

0006                Correspondence, September 25, 1859-April 9,

1865. 120 frames.

0126                Reminiscences: “Things Worth Remembering

from the Distant Past for the Sake of My Precious Daughter, Nellie” [Photostat[. 16 frames.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fayette, Colorado, Wharton, and Matagorda Counties, Texas Military Records, 1861-1862: Location: Reel 25; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection records the names of officers, number of men in companies and their origin, inventory of arms, and remarks concerning the Twenty-second Brigade, Texas State Troops, under Brigadier General William Graham Webb, in the early years of the Civil War. Also included are directives from headquarters printed separately and clipped from newspapers.

0694                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0698                Fayette and Colorado Counties Military Records,

1861-1862. 62 frames.

 

Feris, George Achille Papers, 1841-1878 [Fort Bend County, Texas; also Louisiana and Tennessee] Location: Reel 19; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection includes correspondence and legal documents relating to Feris. Also includes material on the Battle of Woodsonville (December 17, 1861).

0142                Introductory Materials. 6 frames.

0148                March 1, 1863-June 4, 1874, and Undated. 13

frames.

0161                Map-Battle of Woodsonville, December 17, 1861.

2 frames.

0163                Probate Court Record, May 24, 1841. 6 frames.

0169                [Untitled Folder-District Court judgment, January

14, 1861]. 3 frames.

 

Flags captured or recaptured by Union Troops, Register of 1861-1865, 1 roll 1mm National Archives RG 94. M1836 Location: Microfilm Cabinet 3, Drawer 2.

            Oh the one roll of this publication, M1836, is reproduced the register of Confederate flags captured by Union troops and Federal flags recaptured by union troops during the Civil War. This volume is part of the Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1780’s-1917, Record Group 94.

            During the Civil War, flags captured from Confederate forces were presented to the War Department by Generals commanding in the field. There are many letters among the records of the Adjutant General’s Office (AGO) forwarding such flags to the War Department. In some cases, the captors of these flags were ordered to Washington where the individual received a short furlough and the Medal of Honor. The flags, approximately 750 in number, were stored in a vacant room of a building occupied by part of the clerical force of the AGO.

            At the end of the war, the flags were moved to rooms occupied by the superintendent of the War Department buildings. Under the direction of Bvt. Lt. Col. Theodore A. Dodge, a list was prepared showing as much of the history of their capture as could be discerned from the information at hand. A copy of that list, with subsequent annotations, is the volume reproduced on this microfilm roll. The original list ahs not been located. In his report, Colonel Dodge remarked that “it is to be regretted that the history of a least two out of every three of these flags is very imperfect, in many cases, ‘Rebel Flag’ being the only inscription, and only a few can be identified” (H 928 AGO 1867).

            Late in 1874, apparently upon the verbal orders of the Secretary of War, a number of the Confederate flags were placed on display at the Ordnance Museum. Early in 1875, additional flags were sent to the Ordnance Museum. In 1882, all the flags in the possession of the War Department, including those on display at the Ordnance Museum, were boxed and stored in the basement of the new State, War and Navy Department Building. Later, in 1887, due to problems associated with locating the flags and concerns over their decay, the flags were unboxed and stored in the attic of the new War Department Building.

            Of the total number of flags, 22 Confederate flags were either returned to the regiments that captured them or were loaned to the regiments and never returned. Twenty Union flags were returned to the states from whose troops the flags had been captured.

            Numerous requests were received by the War Department for the return of flags. In most cases, the requests were denied on the basis that the flags were the property of the Federal Government. It appears from the records that the Department often declined to return the flags to avoid stirring sectional feelings, while, in some cases, Congress passed joint resolutions calling for their return. In other cases, flags were returned by order of the Secretary of War. In 1887 President Grover Cleveland instructed the Secretary of War to return those flags that could be identified. His decision met with protests from veterans and others, and he later rescinded his instructions, giving a reason that upon further review, he could not find any basis in law for their return, and that final disposition should be left to Congress.

            Over the next 20 years, attempts to resolve the issue were unsuccessful. Then in a joint resolution dated February 28, 1905 (33 Stat 1284), Congress authorized the Secretary of War to deliver the captured flags to proper authorities of the states from which the regiments were organized “for such final disposition as the aforesaid proper authorities may determine.” According to the War Department Annual Report for 1905, at the time of the act, the department held 726 flags; 215 were Union flags captured by the Confederates and subsequently recaptured and 511 were Confederate flags captured by Union troops.

            Under provisions of the resolution, 274 of the flags were returned to the states. A description of those flags can be found in Executive Document Number 163, House of Representatives, 50th Congress, 1st session. Unfortunately, the remaining 164 Union and 288 Confederate flags could not be identified and hence were not returned. The Military Secretary, Brig. Gen. Fred C. Ainsworth, recommended that the Secretary of War, by order, deposit the Union flags at the United States Military Academy. This was done in February 1906. Ainsworth further recommended that the unidentified Confederate flags be donated to a Confederate memorial or historical association but that such action would require approval by Congress. A joint resolution of Congress, approved June 29, 1906, (34 Stat 837) authorized the War Department to deliver the remaining flags to the Confederate Memorial Literary Society of Richmond, Virginia. Today, the flags reside in the Museum of the Confederacy at Richmond.

 

 

 

Foster, James and Family Correspondence, Mss. 2184, 1861-1866 continued.  Location: Reel 5A and 6A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Isaac Gaillard Foster and John Sanderson Foster were sons of James Foster, a medical doctor of Natchez, Mississippi.  The family resided at Hermitage Plantation near Natchez.  Both sons served in the Confederate army.  John S. Foster died of wounds received during the Gettysburg campaign, 1863.  Isaac G. Foster served in Company B of the 10th Mississippi Regiment and died in 1864.

            This collection consists of 110 items and one volume, papers, 1861-1866, of James Foster and family.  John Sanderson Foster’s letters from New Orleans, 1861, relate his views on the secession of Louisiana and describe his life as a law student in New Orleans.  Letters from his army training camp near Memphis, Tennessee, describe his captain, William T. Martin, and his unit, called the Adams Troop.  Letters from various camps in Virginia describe camp life; a railroad wreck of cars bound for Richmond; a hospital in Ashland; the efficiency, membership, and size of the Adams Troop; picket duty; the activities of couriers; Confederate currency; and medical attention offered by women in Richmond to Confederate soldiers.  Battles and skirmishes mentioned in John S. Foster’s letters include the First Battle of Bull Run, the Battle of Williamsburg, the Seven Days Battles of Mechanicsville (Ellison’s Mills), First Cold Harbor, the Second Battle of Bull Run, the Antietam campaign, fighting at Fredericksburg, Virginia, the Battle of Chancellorsville, and the Gettysburg campaign.  The formation of the Jefferson Davis Legion from the Adams Troop and other companies from Mississippi and Alabama and the activities of the Washington Artillery are noted.  Letters of Isaac Gaillard Foster describe his company’s retreat from Corinth during the Shiloh campaign; conditions during the Chattanooga campaign and at Camp Cleburne, Georgia, 1863; the arrest of women at Natchez for carrying on contraband trade, 1864; and fighting in the Atlanta campaign.  Confederate officers described include Patrick Cleburne, Leonidas Polk, and Joseph E. Johnston.  Miscellaneous papers include letters and items relating to the burials of John S. and Isaac G. Foster, lists of things made for soldiers, a military pass issued to James Foster, an oath of allegiance taken by Kate Foster to the Confederate States, 1865, photographs of members of the Foster family, and a narrative description of John S. and Isaac G. Foster.  A diary kept by Isaac G. Foster, May-August 1864, records his experiences during the Atlanta campaign, detailing troop movements, duties, casualties, and skirmishes near Atlanta.  Comments on Confederate military leadership and on the death of John S. Foster are included.

0582                Introductory Materials. 20 frames.

0602                Folder 1, Papers, 1861. 95 frames.

0697                Folder 2, Papers, 1862. 67 frames.

0764                Folder 3, Papers, 1863. 64 frames.

0828                Folder 4, Papers, 1864. 80 frames.

 

 

Fourth Louisiana Regiment Muster Rolls, Confederate States Army Collection, Mss. 0023, 1861 [Camp Moore, Louisiana; also Mississippi].  Location:  Reel 21A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            The 4th Louisiana Infantry Regiment of the Confederate States Army was commanded by Robert J. Barrow until 1862.  During this period, the commanders of the companies were Capt. Edward J. Pullen, Company K; Capt. James H. Wingfield, Company G; Capt. Charles E. Torraen, Company E; Capt. John T. Hilliard, Company I; Capt. Henry A. Rauhman, Company A; Capt. Franc Whicher, Company B; Capt. F.A. Williams, Company D; Capt. Thomas E. Vick, Company A; Capt. H. M. Favrot, Company C; and Capt. John B. Taylor, Company J.  The regiment was formed at Camp Moore, Louisiana, in May 1861 and served on the Mississippi Gulf Coast until 1862, when it was ordered to Jackson, Tennessee, to reinforce Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard’s army.  The regiment fought in the battles of Shiloh, Tennessee, and Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in 1862 and New Hope Church, Peachtree Creek, Ezra Church, and Jonesboro, Georgia, in 1864.  In 1864, they were consolidated with the 30th Louisiana Infantry Regiment for the invasion of Tennessee and later with the 13th and 30th Louisiana Regiments and the 14th Louisiana Battalion Sharpshooters.  They surrendered at Meridian, Mississippi, in May 1865.

            This collection consists of eleven items, muster rolls, 1861, of the 4th Louisiana Infantry Regiment.  The muster rolls document payrolls of various companies in the command for the pay period of August-October 1861.  An additional muster roll for Capt. E. J. Pullen’s company reflects the pay period of October-December 1861.

0295                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0300                Muster Rolls, 1861. 89 frames.

 

Franklin, J.C. Letters, Mss. 2121, 1864 [Lynchburg and Richmond, Virginia].  Location:  Reel 22A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of two items, letters, 1864, of J. C. Franklin.  The letters were written from Chimborazo Hospital, Richmond, Virginia, and Pratt Hospital, Lynchburg, Virginia, to Franklin’s wife, S.W. “Sookey” Franklin, describing conditions in the hospitals.

0349                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0352                Letters, 1864. 7 frames.

 

Frazier Family Papers, 1839-1915 [Bell, Burleson, Ellis, Harris, Hill, and Red River Counties, Texas; also Arkansas, California, and Louisiana] Location: Reel 19; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection consists of the papers of the family of Robert T. Frazier. Materials include correspondence, receipts, a Hillsboro Cemetery Association membership list, legal documents, certificates of election, Confederate veteran material, poetry, and newspaper clippings.

0172                Introductory Materials. 6 frames.

0178                Correspondence, September 2, 1852-May 18,

1915, and Undated. 112 frames.

0290                Receipts, July 27, 1838-January 5, 1909, and

Undated. 34 frames.

0324                [Untitled Folder- Financial Papers and Hillsboro

Cemetery Association Membership List]. 5 frames.

0329                Legal Documents, October 2, 1853-June 22, 1871.

9 frames.

0338                [Untitled Folder- Certificates of Election]. 5

frames.

0343                By-Laws, Rules of Order, List of Officers, of Albert

Sidney Johnston Camp No. 4, Confederate Veterans of California, January 1886. 13 frames.

0356                Printed Material, 1887 and Undated. 3 frames.

0359                Poetry, Undated. 3 frames.

0362                Newspaper Clippings. 2 frames.

 

Freeman, George R. Papers, 1865 [Austin and Coleman, Texas; also Kentucky] Location: Reel 19; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection contains correspondence by Freeman and materials relating to the attack on the Texas State Treasury in 1865.

0364                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0369                [Untitled Folder-Petition Requesting the Creation

of a Volunteer Company to Protect the Texas State Treasury, June 12, 1865]. 6 frames.

0375                Depositions. 12 frames.

0387                [Untitled Folder-Correspondence, Undated]. 11

frames.

0398                Newspaper Clipping. 1 frame.

 

TOP

 

G

Gale and Polk Family Papers, 1815-1940, Jefferson and Yazoo Counties, Mississippi; also North Carolina, Tennessee, and Louisiana; Location: Reel 2 & 3; Southern Women and Their Families in the 19th Century, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Description of the Collection

            This collection includes family and military papers, chiefly 1815 through 1881. Antebellum papers concern family affairs, agriculture, politics, and epidemics, and a description of Mount Vernon, Virginia; numerous Civil War letters written by William Dudley Gale while serving as general staff officer under generals Leonidas Polk and Alexander P. Stewart (1821-1908), with descriptions of the Battle of Chickamauga, the Atlanta Campaign of 1864, and the battles of Franklin and Nashville, and his opinions concerning Jefferson Davis, Nathan Bedford Forrest, Braxton Bragg (1817-1876), William Joseph Hardee (1815-1873), John Bell Hood (1831-1879), and Joseph E. Johnston (1807-1891); scattered Civil War correspondence between Leonidas Polk and his wife; recollections (1895) of Katherine (Polk) Gale, of her life during the Civil War in Nashville, Tennessee, and Yazoo County, Mississippi, and Asheville, North Carolina; and diaries (1873-1874) of Frances (Devereux) Polk, recording her activities in the Gale household near Nashville. There are scattered letters written by Thomas Gale, Anne (Green) Gale (antebellum only), William Dudley Gale, Leonidas Polk, Frances (Devereux) Polk, and others before and during the Civil War. The recollections written by Katherine (Polk) Gale contain much information about the Polk and Gale families and the disruptive effects of the Civil War on life in Mississippi and North Carolina. The diaries of Frances (Devereux) Polk consist of only brief daily entries and memoranda chiefly regarding personal and family matters.

            While a staff officer in the Confederate army, William Dudley Gale wrote a large number of letters to his wife. He discussed the operations of Polk’s Corps (also known as the “Army of Mississippi”) of the Army of Tennessee from late 1862 until the death of Leonidas Polk in June 1864, after which he described activities of Stewart’s Corps of the Army of Tennessee. There is a sketch map of the Nashville battleground and also typed transcriptions of two long letters written in January 1865.

            The collection is arranged as follows: Series 1, Correspondence and Other Loose Papers, and Series 2, Diary and Recollections.

Biographical Note

            Thomas Gale (fl. 1815-1881), a physician who served with Indian-fighting soldiers in Alabama Territory in 1815 and afterwards became a planter in Jefferson and Yazoo counties, Mississippi, and later in Davidson County, Tennessee, married Ann M. Greene (fl. 1820-1845). William Dudley Gale (fl. 1844-1881), their son, married Katherine (“Kate”) Polk (fl. 1858-1895) in 1858, after his first wife died. He joined the Confederate army as a staff officer for his father-in-law, General Leonidas Polk, in the fall of 1862. After the general’s death near Pine Mountain, Georgia, in June 1864, Gale was assigned to the staff of General Alexander P. Stewart. The family resided near Nashville, Tennessee, after the Civil War. Thomas and Ann (Greene) Gale has at least two other sons: Abner G. Gale and Josiah R. Gale. Other Gales mentioned in these papers include James G., John, Josiah, and Robert; also John Hutchins, an uncle of Thomas Gale. Greene family members mentioned in the papers include Ann (Greene) Gale’s mother, Mary Greene, and brother, William H. Greene.

            Leonidas Polk (1806-1864), son of William Polk (1758-1844) and Sarah (Hawkins) Polk (fl. 1828-1855), was born in Raleigh, North Carolina, and attended the University of North Carolina from 1821 to 1823, when he transferred to the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York. He graduated in 1827 but, having converted to the Episcopal Church, resigned his commission from the U.S. Army. He became an ordained deacon, and in 1830, married Frances Ann (“Fanny”) Devereux (1807-1875) of Raleigh, North Carolina. She was the daughter of John Devereux (1761-1844) and Frances (Pollock) Devereux (1771-1849). Other relatives mentioned in the collection include Leonidas Polk’s nephew, Lucius Eugene Polk (1833-1892), and Leonidas Polk’s sister, Susan S. (Polk) Rayner.

            After traveling and living with Frances in various places from Virginia to Louisiana, Leonidas Polk was made bishop of Louisiana in 1841. He became a sugar planter, utilizing a large number of slaves inherited by his wife from the Devereux family of North Carolina. He also helped found the University of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee, in 1857. In 1861, he was appointed major general in the Confederate army; and in 1862, promoted to lieutenant general. He served in independent command under Generals Albert Sidney Johnston, Braxton Bragg, and Joseph E. Johnston. He was killed during the Atlanta campaign on June 14, 1864. Frances (Devereux) Polk rented a house in Asheville, North Carolina, during the latter half of the Civil War, and afterwards lived, much of the time, with her daughter Katherine (Polk) Gale and son-in-law William Dudley Gale, near Nashville, Tennessee, until her death in 1875.

0177                Introductory Materials. 19 frames.

Series 1

0196                Description of Series 1. 3 frames.

0199                Folder 1, 1815-1819. 25 frames.

0224                Folder 2, 1820-1839. 34 frames.

0258                Folder 3, 1844-1859. 90 frames.

0348                Folder 4, 1861-1863. 96 frames.

0444                Folder 5, 1864. 78 frames.

0522                Folder 6, 1865. 53 frames.

0575                Folder 7, 1871-1885, 1935, and 1940. 44 frames.

0619                Folder 8, Undated. 12 frames.

Series 2

0631                Description of Series 2. 2 frames.

0633                Folder 9, Volume 1, Frances Devereux Polk, Diary,

1873. 221 frames.

0854                Folder 10, Volume 2, Frances Devereux Polk,

Diary, 1874. 215 frames.

Reel 3

0001                Folder 11, Volume 3, Katherine Polk Gale,

Recollections, 1895. 91 frames.

0092                Folder 12, Typed Transcription of Volume 3. 85

frames.

 

Gibson and Humphreys Family Papers, 1846-1919, Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana; also Kentucky, Montana, and Washington, D.C.; Location; Reel 3 & 4; Southern Women and Their Families in the 19th Century, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Description of the Collection

            The Gibson and Humphreys families were residents of Live Oak and/or Oak Forest Plantation near Tigerville in Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana, and Sumner’s Forest Plantation near Versailles, Kentucky. Prominent family members include Tobias Gibson (d. ca. 1870), plantation owner in Louisiana; his son Randall Gibson (1832-1892), lawyer and U.S. representative and senator from 1875 through 1892; his daughter Sarah Gibson Humphreys (fl. 1846-1885), fiction writer; and her son Joseph A. Humphreys, Jr. (fl. 1870-1898).

            This collection includes correspondence, a few financial items, and miscellaneous items. The correspondence documents the period before the Civil War when the Gibson children were in school at the Phillips Academy, Yale, and traveling in Europe. One of the sons wrote about opposing views of North and South on slavery. After the Civil War, the correspondence chiefly documents the lives of the Humphreys family and their efforts to improve their financial situation. Among other things, it documents Sarah Humphrey’s writing efforts and her support of women’s causes, particularly suffrage; Joseph A. Humphreys, Jr.’s efforts to run a sheep ranch near Miles City, Montana; and the experiences of two women (cousins?) who obtained jobs working at the Post Office and the Department of the Interior in Washington, D.C. Letters from family and friends describing their activities are also included, as are a number of letters written by Randall Gibson on family and business affairs. Randall Lee Gibson’s professional life is not documented, but there are numerous letters written by him on family and business affairs.

            The collection is arranged as follows: Series 1, 1846-1849; Series 2, 1850-1860; Series 3, 1861-1865; Series 4, 1867-1872; Series 5, 1873-1879; Series 6, 1880-1885; Series 7, 1886-1919; and Series 8, Undated.

Biographical Note

            The chief figures in these papers are Tobias Gibson of Live Oak and/or Oak Forest Plantation near Tigerville, Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana; and his family, especially his daughter, Sarah, who married Joseph A. Humphreys of Kentucky; and her son, Joseph Humphreys.

            Tobias Gibson and his wife, whose maiden name is not given, probably moved to Louisiana from Kentucky, and maintained close relations with relatives and friends there. He was a planter and owned plantations named Live Oak and Oak Forest (possibly the same place), and another plantation referred to as Holly Wood. Their children, in approximate order of their age, are listed below:

            Preston, who studied medicine and was a planter, had a wife named Elodie and a son named Preston. There is not much in the papers about Preston Gibson, who died sometime between 7 April 1864, and 13 February 1867, and there are only brief references to his wife and son thereafter.

            Randall Lee, the best known member of the family, served in the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate. He was born in 1832, graduated from Yale College in 1853, and studied law at the University of Louisiana (late Tulane). He became a brigadier general in the Confederate Army and after the war practiced law in New Orleans. He served as a representative, 1875-1883, and as a senator from 1883 until his death in 1892. He married Mary Montgomery of Kentucky, and had a son Montgomery and a daughter named Leila and perhaps other daughters. There are many letters from him in the collection, chiefly on family and business affairs, not politics. His family frequently refers to him as “Lee.”

            Sarah Thompson Gibson married Joseph A. Humphreys of Summer’s Forest near Versailles, Kentucky, probably in 1853. She wrote fiction and evidently had a few short stories published. The papers indicate that she also wrote a book, but she apparently did not find a publisher. She had three children, Lucy, Sarah Gibson (Sallie), and Joseph A., Jr. Her husband was in ill health, and although he probably did not serve in the Confederate army, he died sometime in the war years. Lucy married Lewis A. Johnstone; Sallie evidently never married (although Dr. Hamilton recalled that the donor of the papers was introduced to him as Mrs. S. G. Humphreys and was an elderly woman in 1944, it seems impossible that she could have been Mrs. Joseph A. Humphreys, Sr., and possible that she was actually Miss Sallie G. Humphreys). Sometime between 1888 and 1898, Joseph, Jr. married, but the only mane given for his wife is Mary. They had a son named Joseph.

            Claude was a student at Andover, Yale, and in Europe. He may have been killed during the Civil War.

            Tobias studied at Andover, Yale, the University of North Carolina in 1857, and in Europe. He served in the Confederate army, studied law, and later lived in Louisiana and in Kentucky. His wife was named Eva. He is usually called Tobe or Toby in the correspondence.

            Hart studied at Yale and became a planter at Hartland in Kentucky before the Civil War. He married Mary Duncan of Lexington, Kentucky, and had a son named Duncan.

            John McKinley was called McKinley, Kin, or Kinny. He studied at Andover and in Europe, served in the Confederate army, lived in Kentucky after the war, was usually in ill health, and died in 1880.

            Louisiana H., called Loulie, the youngest of the children, was sent to school in Paris during the Civil War. She married sometime in the mid-1870s (husband not named in the papers) and died in childbirth in 1877.

            Less is known about the family of Joseph A. Humphreys. Joseph was the son of D. C. Humphreys, whose chief plantation seems to have been Waverly, in Woodford County, Kentucky. He had a brother named Samuel, and possibly sisters named Mary, Lucy, and Sue. D. C. Humphreys apparently died long before his wife, who continued to live at Waverly most of the time. The Humphreys children were frequently with her and refer to “Grandma” and “Aunt Mary.” In later years Grandma traveled quite a bit in the north and visited relatives in New York, frequently accompanied by one of the Humphreys girls.

            There are many letters from and references to relatives in Kentucky, where both the Humphreys and the Gibsons seem to have had widespread connections. Aunt Anne was Tobias Gibson’s sister, but whether she was married and, if so, to whom, is not clear. Susan was a cousin of the Gibson family, married a Grigsby, and was a widow with several children, including Virginia and Hart, when she corresponded with Sarah Gibson Humphreys. Many other relatives cannot be identified at all.

0177                Introductory Materials. 17 frames.

Series 1

0194                Description of Series 1. 1 frame

0195                Folder 1, 1846-1849. 45 frames.

Series 2

0240                Description of Series 2. 1 frame

0241                Folder 2, 1850-1853. 58 frames.

0299                Folder 3, 1854-1855. 59 frames.

0358                Folder 4, 1856-1860. 60 frames.

Series 3

0418                Description of Series 3. 1 frame

0419                Folder 5, 1861-1865. 32 frames.

Series 4

0451                Description of Series 4. 1 frame

0452                Folder 6, 1867-1872. 36 frames.

Series 5

0488                Description of Series 5. 1 frame.

0488                Folder 7, 1873-1874. 51 frames.

0539                Folder 8, 1875-1876. 50 frames.

0589                Folder 9, 1877-1878. 33 frames.

0622                Folder 10, 1879. 79 frames.

Series 6

0701                Description of Series 6. 2 frames.

0702                Folder 11, 1880. 53 frames.

0755                Folder 12, 1881. 100 frames.

0855                Folder 13, 1882. 62 frames.

0917                Folder 14, January-June 1883. 77 frames.

Reel 4

0001                Folder 15, July-December 1883. 59 frames.

0060                Folder 16, 1884. 72 frames.

0132                Folder 17, January-October 1885. 33 frames.

0165                Folder 18, November-December 1885. 30 frames.

Series 7

0195                Description of Series 7. 1 frame

0196                Folder 19, 1886-1887. 31 frames.

0227                Folder 20, 1888-1919. 36 frames.

Series 8: Undated

0263                Description of Series 8. 1 frame.

0264                Folder 21, Fragments. 26 frames.

0290                Folder 22, Fragments. 28 frames.

0318                Folder 23, Undated. 48 frames.

0366                Folder 24, Undated. 56 frames.

 

Gibson, Randall Lee Papers, Mss. 2402, 2412, 2423, 1848-1891 [New Orleans and Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana; also Alabama].  Location:  Reel 6, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Randall Lee Gibson (1832-1892), Confederate States Army brigadier general and New Orleans, Louisiana, lawyer, was a U.S. representative and senator from Louisiana.        

            This collection consists of 164 items, papers, 1848-1891, of Randall Lee Gibson.  Civil War material consists of Gibson’s orders, general reports, and casualty reports during the tour of duty at Spanish Fort, Mobile, Alabama, 1865.  Letters discuss movements of Gibson’s troops at the Battle of Shiloh, August 1863, and near Spanish Fort, on the eastern shore of Mobile Bay, April 1865. Handwritten copies of special orders, 1861, for the 13th Regiment of Louisiana Volunteers are included along with a copy of a letter, 1861, from Gibson’s sister, Eleanora, from New Orleans, which discusses fund-raising for the Confederate army and a fire in the city.

            A list of omissions from Randall Lee Gibson Papers, Mss. 2402, 2412, 2423, 1848-1891, is provided on Reel 6, Frame 0276.  Omissions consist of papers, 1867-1891, including mortgages and leases for Magnolia, Oak Forest, and Greenwood plantations of Terrebonne Parish and for properties in New Orleans; receipts for taxes; insurance policies; and correspondence.

0114                Introductory Materials. 11 frames.

0125                Folder 1, Papers, 1848-1855 and 1860. 42

frames.

0167                Folder 2, Papers, 1861-1869. 25 frames.

0192                Folder 3, Memoranda, 1865. 14 frames.

0206                Folder 4, General Orders, March-April 1865. 7

frames.

0213                Folder 5, Morning Reports, March-April 1865. 27

frames.

0240                Folder 6, Reports of Casualties, March-April 1865.

22 frames.

0262                Folder 9, Photograph, Undated, ca. 1861-1865. 3

frames.

0265                Folder 10, Copies of Special Orders, 1861, and

Letter from Eleanora, 20 December 1861. 11 frames.

0276                List of Omissions from Randall Lee Gibson

Papers, Mss. 2401, 2412, 2423, 1848-1891. 1 frame.

 

Giles, G. W. Letters, Mss. 2133, 1862-1863 [Vicksburg and Jackson, Mississippi; also Alabama].  Location:  Reel 3A & 6A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of twenty-three items, letters, September 1862-August 1863, of G. W. Giles to his wife.  Letters comment upon routine matters pertaining to Company E, 35th Regiment of Alabama Volunteers near Vicksburg and Jackson, Mississippi; Federal prisoners from Fort Donelson, Tennessee; guarding prisoners of war; U.S. Army deserters near Jackson, Mississippi; prospects for peace; troop movements; life in army camps; wages; and personal matters.

0066                Introductory Materials. 6 frames.

0072                Letters, September 1862-August 1863. 30

frames.

 

Greene Jr., Raney Papers, 1862-1865 [Texas and Louisiana] Location: Reel 19; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection contains materials pertaining to Greene’s service in Company F of the Crescent Regiment of Louisiana Volunteers in the Confederate Army. Includes correspondence, military orders, receipts, an orderly book, muster rolls, a diary, and a poem.

0399                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0404                Correspondence, August 14, 1862. 3 frames.

0407                Military Orders, July 19, 1863- February 5, 1864.

5 frames.

0412                Military Receipts, April 1 and August 20, 1863. 1

frame.

0413                Orderly’s Book, 1862. 27 frames.

0440                [Untitled Folder-Muster Rolls, November 1, 1862

April 30, 1863]. 47 frames.

0487                Diary, October 16, 1862-January 1, 1865. 62

frames.

0549                Poem, “Dedicated to the Crescents,” Undated. 4

frames.

 

Guion, Lewis Diary, Mss. 826, 1862-1863 [New Orleans, Louisiana; also Mississippi].  Location:  Reel 6A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Lewis Guion (1838-1920), the son of a sugar planter, was a jurist of Lafourche Parish, Louisiana.  On 12 March 1862, Guion enlisted as an officer in Company H of the 26th Louisiana Infantry Regiment under the leadership of Col. Duncan S. Cage.

            This collection consists of one item, the diary, 24 April 1862-8 August 1863, of Lewis Guion.  The diary describes Guion’s departure from New Orleans, 24 April 1862, his company’s march from Camp Moore to Donaldsonville, Baton Rouge, and Greensburg, 4 May 1862, and military activities around Chickasaw Bayou and Yazoo Lake, 24-29 December 1862.  Entries after 18 May 1863 give a daily account of the siege of Vicksburg and events following the siege.  Entries describe routine activities, the receipt of Northern and Southern newspapers by the besieged, the arrival of couriers from Johnston’s army, camp food, and daily rations.  The diary lists names and gives total numbers of daily casualties during the siege, recording information about individuals killed.

0345                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0350                Diary, 1862-1863. 74 frames.

 

 

 

 

Gurley, John W. Papers, Mss. 507, 1858-1866 [New Orleans and Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 6A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            John W. Gurley, an attorney in New Orleans, Louisiana, was associated with Edward G. Stewart, a planter of Oak Lawn Plantation, Tangipahoa Parish.

            This collection consists of eighty-one items, papers, 1858-1866, of John W. Gurley.  The majority of the letters in the collection are from Edward G. Stewart.   Letters discuss crop conditions, routine planting, weather, prices of slaves, the purchase of farm animals and equipment, the construction of Gurley’s home, the cutting of lumber, the charcoal industry, the arrival of Confederate refugees in New Orleans, 1862, and the wages of white and African American freedmen laborers.  One letter mentions a white laborer being paid fifty cents per day by an African American tenant farmer.  A letter from W. H. Pearce, Livingston Parish, Louisiana, discusses secession and political conditions in the nation, December 1860.  Eight letters from an African American tenant farmer, Charles Daggs, comment on the manufacture and marketing of charcoal, farming matters, rations, clothing, commodities needed, sales of timber, livestock, crops, and freedmen’s wages of twenty-five dollars monthly as established by the U.S. provost marshal, 1865-1866.  Papers of the Civil War period include a certificate that claims that Gurley and his wife were enemies of the United States, 1862; an order from the provost marshal for Gurley to leave Orleans Parish, 1863; the Gurleys’ oaths of allegiance to the United States and letters confirming their loyalty, 1864-1865; and an authorization for Gurley to practice law in New Orleans, 1865.

0424                Introductory Materials. 17 frames.

0441                Folder 1, Papers, 1858-1859. 46 frames.

0487                Folder 2, Papers, 1860. 35 frames.

0522                Folder 3, Papers, 1861-1866. 60 frames.

 

TOP

 

H

Hagan, James and Family Papers, Mss. 1485, 1833-1901 [Mobile, Alabama; also Texas].  Location:  Reel 6A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            James H. Hagan (1821-1901), a native or Ireland, came to America as an infant with his parents.  He grew up in Pennsylvania, where his father was a farmer.  At the outset of the war with Mexico, Hagan joined the Texas Rangers and participated in the storming of Monterey.  He received a commission as captain in the Third Dragoons and was mustered out of service at the close of the conflict.  At that time, Hagan turned his attentions to planting in Alabama.  In 1861, he was commissioned captain with a company from Mobile County and shortly after was commissioned major of a regiment.  Following the battle at Shiloh, Hagan was made colonel of the newly created Third Alabama Cavalry.  For the last two years of the Civil War, he was a brigade commander under Gen. Wheeler.  Hagan was promoted to the rank of brigadier general just before the close of the war.

            This collection consists of sixty-three items, family papers, 1833-1901, of James Hagan.  Papers relate to Hagan’s military career and his death.  Items include Hagan’s commission as captain, issued by U.S. President James K. Polk; a slave bill of sale; an invitation to the reunion of the survivors of the Alabama Cavalry.  Third Regiment; Confederate currency issued as payment for service in the Army of the Confederate States; and a request for James Hagan to be appointment for military service in the Spanish-American War.

            A list of omissions from James Hagan Family Papers, Mss. 1485, 1833-1901, is provided on Reel 6, Frame 0618. Omitted Materials consist of Folder 1, John Hagan Correspondence, 1833-1848.

0582                Introductory Materials. 6 frames.

0588                Folder 2, Papers, 1857-1866. 13 frames.

0601                Folder 3, Papers, 1887 and 1898. 4 frames.

0605                Folder 4, Currency, 1864. 2 frames.

0607                Folder 5, Newspaper Clippings, 1892, 1901, and Undated. 11 frames.

0618                List of Omissions from James Hagan and Family Papers, Mss. 1485, 1833-1901. 1 frame.

 

Hall, Ben W. Papers, 1861-1862 [Burnett and Travis Counties, Texas] Location: Reel 19; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection contains correspondence and military orders relating to Hall’s service in the Confederate Army.

0553                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0556                Correspondence, October 10, 1861-December 5,

1862. 15 frames.

0571                Military Orders, October 11, 1861-September 19,

1862. 11 frames.

0582                “List of Men from Travis County at Work at the

Salt Works of James Daughtery and Company.” 1 frame.

 

Hamilton, James Allen Diary, 1861-1864 [Corsicana, Galveston, Limestone County, and Navarro County, Texas; also Louisiana and Tennessee] Location: Reel 19; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection consists of Hamilton’s diary of his service in Captain Melton’s Company of Texas Volunteer Infantry.

0583                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0588                Biographical Sketch, Notes on the James Allen

Hamilton Diary, 1960. 3 frames.

0591                Diary, October 4, 1861-July 7, 1864. 14 frames.

 

Hardeman Jr., Blackstone Papers, 1833-1927 [Denton and Nacogdoches Counties, Texas; also District of Columbia, Georgia, and Mississippi] Location: Reel 19; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            These papers relate to Blackstone Hardeman Jr. and his family. Hardeman served in Company K of the First Texas Infantry Regiment. Materials include correspondence, legal documents, financial records, receipts, a speech, genealogical material, account ledgers, and a muster roll.

0605                Introductory Materials. 6 frames.

0611                Omissions List. 2 frames.

0613                Correspondence, May 25, 1857-March 4, 1928. 8

frames.

0621                Correspondence, June 24, 1862-October 29, 1927

[Photostats]. 36 frames.

0657                Legal Documents, August 4, 1834-December 24,

1873. 12 frames.

0669                Financial Records, 1833-1854. 8 frames.

0677                Receipt, Undated. 1 frame.

0678                Speech, Undated. 5 frames.

0683                Genealogical Material from the Hardeman Family

Bible [Photostats]. 6 frames.

0689                Muster Roll, Company K, First Texas Regiment,

Army, Confederate States of America. 7 frames.

 

Hart, M. Letter, Mss. 4553, 1862 [Port Hudson, Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 6A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of one item, a letter, 10 November 1862, from M. Hart, Port Hudson, Louisiana, to Nehemiah Williams.  The letter describes camp life, discouragement, rumors, and family news.

0619                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0622                Letter, 10 November 1862. 3 frames.

 

Haynie, Martin L. Letter, 1810.  West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana.  Location:  Reel 6, Antebellum Southern Plantations

            Martin L. Haynie, originally from Baltimore, Maryland, was active against the Spanish in Louisiana and Florida in the 1810s.  The collection consists of a letter, dated October 25, 1810, from Martin L. Haynie, St. Francisville, Louisiana, to John Ballinger, who was in command at a fort on the present site of Baton Rouge, Louisiana.  Haynie discussed his role in stirring up sentiment for revolt against the Spanish among the American inhabitants in the region, a contemplated expedition against the Spanish at Pensacola, and his thoughts about a “new republic,” which might replace Spanish rule.  Haynie also indicated that he would soon travel to Baltimore.

0285                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0289                Folder 1, 1810. 5 frames.

 

 

Head, William P. Papers, 1861-1869 [Kentucky Town, Texas; also Arkansas and Louisiana] Location: Reel 19; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection consists of correspondence by William Head relating to his service in the Civil War.

0696                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0700                Correspondence, May 7, 1862-July 11, 1869. 50

frames.

 

Heartsill, William Willis Papers, 1863-1865 and 1911-1916 [Huntsville, Marshall, and Waco, Texas; also Arkansas and Virginia] Location: Reel 19; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection contains Heartsill’s diaries and notebooks. Materials included are notes on Confederate veterans, with specific reference to such figures as Patrick Cleburne. Nathan Bedford Forrest, Thomas Jonathan “Stonewall” Jackson, and Theodore O’Hara. The collection also contains newspaper clippings and a map of Polk County, Texas.

0750                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0755                Diary, September 17, 1863-February 12, 1865. 48

frames.

0803                Notes on Major General Patrick Cleburne. 4

frames.

0807                Notes on Nathan Bedford Forrest. 5 frames.

0812                Notes on Thomas Jonathan “Stonewall” Jackson.

7 frames.

0819                Notes on Theodore O’Hara. 1 frame

0820                General Notes on Confederate Veterans. 1 frame.

0821                Notebook of Remarks Upon the Deaths of

Confederate Veterans, March 1908-July 6, 1916. 34 frames.

0855                Notes on Omission of Transcription of Diary and

Notebook of Remarks on the Deaths of Confederate Veterans, 1953. 2 frames.

0857                Newspaper Clippings, Undated. 1 frame.

0858                Map of Polk County, Texas, Undated. 2 frames.

 

 

Hennen-Jennings Family Papers, Mss. 748, 1803-1918 [New Orleans, Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 6 & 7A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Alfred Hennen of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and New Haven, Connecticut, moved to New Orleans, Louisiana, in 1808 and bought a country house named Retreat. His sister, Eliza Hennen, and his father, Dr. James Hennen, lived in Nashville, Tennessee. Alfred Hennen was a civil lawyer, a Presbyterian, a professor of constitutional law in New Orleans, and a director of the old Bank of Louisiana. His daughter, Ann Marie Jennings, née Hennen, married Needler R. Jennings in 1843. Jennings was a major in the Confederate army and served as aide-de-camp to Gen. Leonidas Polk at the Battle of Shiloh, 1862, where Jennings was wounded. Needler R. Jennings died in 1863. Ann Marie Jennings received a pardon from Andrew Johnson in 1866 for her part in the rebellion.

            This collection consists of 216 items, papers, 1803-1918(bulk 1850-1870), of the Hennen and Jennings family. The bulk of the collection consists of family correspondence to Ann Marie Jennings and others from family members, 1830-1918. Personal letters of Alfred Hennen are written from Philadelphia and New Haven to his sister, Eliza Hennen, and his father, Dr. James Hennen, and concern religious matters, 1803-1823. Correspondence to Needler R. Jennings includes letters from Alexander Dimitry, historian and educator, 1851-1856; a letter from L. Agassiz, Swiss scientist and educator, 1852; letters from Pierre Soule, U.S. senator, minister to Spain, and Confederate official, 1853-1863; and a letter from Gen. Leonidas Polk commending him on his services, 1862. Most Civil War correspondence is addressed to members of the Jennings family. Documents include a pardon of Ann Marie Jennings, signed by Andrew Johnson, which entitled her to own property, 1866; a testamentary document of Needler R. Jennings, 1863; and the Italian passport of Ann Marie Jennings and her daughters, 1869. Undated items include stories by Louisiana author Octavius N. Ogden, husband of Cora Hennen Jennings. Also included are an unidentified photograph and genealogical records of Rev. Henry Smith and the Ogden family, undated.

            A list of omissions from Hennen-Jennings Family Papers, Mss. 748, 1803-1918, is provided on Reel 7, Frame 0384. Omissions consist of printed volumes, including sermons and discourses of Rev. Benjamin M. Palmer, and a bound manuscript volume of essays by Needler R. Jennings.

0625                Introductory Materials. 12 frames.

0637                Folder 1, Papers, 1803-1823. 22 frames.

0659                Folder 2, Papers, 1832-1838. 92 frames.

0751                Folder 3, Papers, 1840-1859. 152 frames.

Reel 7

0001                Folder 4, Papers, 1860-1868. 179 frames.

0180                Folder 5, Papers, 1870-1918. 40 frames.

0220                Folder 6, Papers, Undated. 123 frames.

0343                Folder 7, Newspaper Clippings, 1807-1896. 14 frames.

0357                Folder 8, Newspaper Clippings, 1901-1935 and Undated. 27 frames.

0384                List of Omissions from Hennen- Jennings Family Papers, Mss. 748, 1803-1918. 1 frame.

 

Hero, Andrew Jr. and George Hero Papers, Mss. 976, 977, 994, 1030,  1039, 1829-1905 [New Orleans, Louisiana; also Virginia] Location:   Reel 8; Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

Andrew J. Hero, Jr. was a captain in the Washington Artillery of the Confederate army.  Organized in 1838, this unit fought in the Mexican War as Persifal Smith’s Regiment.  It was reorganized in 1852 as the Washington Artillery and was among the most famous of the Confederate volunteer artillery units, being composed of prominent men of New Orleans.  Hero served chiefly in Virginia, February 1861-April 1865.  He was a Republican candidate for membership in the U.S. House of Representatives and acted as Louisiana state representative at several national Republican conventions.  He was also an agent for the purchase of land in Texas for other people.  He was appointed commissioner of deeds in the states of Louisiana, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Vermont, Florida, Mississippi, Texas and Ohio.

            This collection consists of 559 items, two manuscript volumes, and four printed volumes, papers, 1829-1905, of Andrew Hero Jr. and George Hero.  Correspondence; financial, professional, and political papers; and photographs document the personal and professional life of Andrew Hero Jr.  Correspondence includes letters and telegrams that treat matters of financial, political, and personal interest and mention the Washington Artillery.  Civil War-era letters describe camp life (especially in Manassas and Petersburg, Virginia), fighting, maneuvers, morale, personnel, transportation by railroad, and other matters.  Financial papers illustrate purchases of land for himself and for others, 1840-1890, and include deeds, land grants, mortgage agreements, and tax and insurance receipts.  Professional papers show his appointments  as commissioner of deeds to various states, 1866-1879.  Political papers reflect his activities in the Republican Party as a candidate for membership in the U.S. House of Representatives.  Personal papers document his role in the Washington Artillery and invitations addressed to Matilda Hero reflect the various functions sponsored by the Washington Artillery.  Two photograph albums illustrate the lives of Andrew Hero Jr. and his family and include some Civil War images.

            A list of omissions from Andrew Jr. and George H. Hero Papers, Mss. 976, 977, 994, 1030, 1039, 1829-1905, is provided on Reel 8, Frame 0566. Omitted items consist of printed matter and plats.

0385                Introductory materials. 19 frames.

0404                Folder 1, Papers, 1829-1860. 42 frames.

0446                Folder 2, Papers, 1861-1862. 107 frames.

0553                Folder 3, Papers, 1863-1865. 84 frames.

0637                Folder 4, Papers, 1866-1869. 58 frames.

0695                Folder 5, Papers, 1870-1874. 79 frames.

0774                Folder 6, Papers, 1875-1879. 105 frames.

0879                Folder 7, Papers, 1880-1881. 96 frames.

Reel 8

0001                Folder 8, Papers, 1882. 63 frames.

0064                Folder 9, Papers, 1883. 70 frames.

0134                Folder 10, Papers, 1884-1888. 74 frames.

0208                Folder 11, Papers, 1889-1891. 123 frames.

0331                Folder 12, Papers, 1893-1905. 39 frames.

0370                Folder 13, Papers, Undated. 7 frames.

0377                Folder 14, Commissions, 1865-1879. 19 frames.

0396                Folder 15, Commissions, 1878-1880. 53 frames.

0449                Folder 16, Commissions, 1881-1890. 58 frames.

0507                Folder 17, Newspaper Clippings, 1902 and

Undated. 4 frames.

0511                Folder 18, Photographs, Undated. 7 frames.

0518                Volume 1, Picture Album, Undated. 25 frames.

0543                Volume 2, Picture Album, 1883-1894 and

Undated. 23 frames.

0566                List of Omissions from Andrew Jr. and George

Hero Papers, Mss. 976, 977, 994, 1030, 1039, 1829-1905. 1 frame.

 

Hinckley, Orramel and Family Papers, Mss. 970, 1151, 1317, 1811-1897 [New Orleans and Opelousas and St. Landry Parishes, Louisiana] Reel 8 & 9 Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Orramel Hinckley (1813-1868) was a steamboat operator and captain whose business was centered principally in New Orleans and Opelousas, Louisiana. His wife, Anna Hawley Gardner (1824-1886), and son, Orramel Strong Hinckley (1840-1885), lived in Washington, St. Landry Parish. The Hinckleys were related to the families of Asa Norton and Thomas Gardner, tanners and dealers in hides and deerskins in St. Landry Parish.

            The collection consists of 335 items and sixteen volumes. Personal and business papers, 1834-1897, of Orramel Hinckley document his work as a steamboat captain. The collection includes five photographs of Hinckley family members. Civil War letters and papers pertain largely to the transportation of government stores and the procurement of supplies for the Confederate army. Hinckley served as a second lieutenant on Confederate transport vessels. A letter, undated, of Orran Gardner, Camp Boggs, Shreveport, Louisiana, requests clothing and describes camp conditions and Federal prisoners of war. A letter, 16 July 1861, from Capt. Nat Offutt, Fairfax Station, Virginia, describes the Confederate preparations for battle there. Other Civil War letters and items concern riverborne commerce and the movement of material. Confederate States’ orders and tax receipts and amnesty oaths signed by members of the Hinckley family are included.

            A list of omissions from Orramel Hinckley and Family Papers, Mss. 970, 1151, 1317, 1811-1897, is provided on Reel 9, Frame 0189. Omissions consist of volumes and printed matter, including account books concerning personal and business affairs, and folders 12 and 14, printed items concerning medicine and Freemasons.

0567                Introductory Materials. 9 frames.

0576                Folder 1, Papers, 1811-1819 and Undated Items

on Making Leather. 19 frames.

0595                Folder 2, Papers, 1820-1829. 37 frames.

0632                Folder 3, Papers, 1830-1839. 77 frames.

0709                Folder 4, Papers, 1840-1849. 63 frames.

0772                Folder 5, Papers, 1850-1857. 92 frames.

0864                Folder 6, Papers, 1858-1860. 85 frames.

Reel 9

0001                Folder 7, papers, 1861-1865. 67 frames.

0068                Folder 8m Papers, 1866-1897. 56 frames.

0124                Folder 9, Papers, Undated. 7 frames.

0131                Folder 10, Newspapers, 1867-1887. 11 frames.

0142                Folder 11, Pictures, Undated. 6 frames.

0148                Folder 13, Copies and Extracts of Manuscripts and

Genealogical Data, Undated. 41 frames.

0189                List of Omissions from Orramel Hinckley and

Family Papers, Mss. 970, 1151, 1317, 1811-1897. 1 frame.

 

 

Hinson, R. M. Papers, Mss. 893, 1861 [Bastrop, Morehouse Parish, Louisiana; also Arkansas and Missouri] Reel 9 Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            R. M. Hinson (d. 1861) was a Confederate captain in Company B, Morehouse Guards, 3rd Louisiana Infantry Regiment. Hinson enlisted on 17 May 1861 and was killed on 10 August 1861, after the Battle of Oak Hills, Missouri.

            This collection consists of three items, letters from R. M. Hinson to his wife, Mattie, of Bastrop, Morehouse Parish. Letters describe scenery along the line of march from Van Buren, Arkansas, to Maysville, Missouri, and military events under the leadership of Col. Hyams and Brig. Gen. McCulloch. A military pass issued to Hinson is also present.

0190                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0194                Papers, 1861. 10 frames.

 

 

 

Holmsley, James M. Papers, 1861-1864 and 1872-1898 [Camp Colorado, Camp Cooper, Camp Jackson, Camp Leon, Comanche, Fort Belknap, Fort Mason, Galveston, San Antonio, and Uvalde, Texas] Location: Reel 19; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            These papers consist of correspondence, legal documents, financial records, receipts, essays, muster rolls, monthly returns, military orders and reports, quartermaster records, certificates of disability, an inventory of personal effects of deceased soldiers, and photographs. Holmsley served in Company G of the 1st Regiment of Texas Mounted Riflemen in the confederate Army.

0860                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0865                Correspondence, October 1861-May 6, 1898, and

Undated. 26 frames.

0891                Legal Documents, July 21, 1867- February 19,

1881. 9 frames.

0900                Personal Receipts, September 20, 1873-August 8,

1882. 4 frames.

0904                Wichita Savings Bank Account Record, September

14- November 21, 1874. 2 frames.

0906                Promissory Notes, September 4, 1871- Ocrobert

11, 1872. 6 frames.

0912                Personal Check, July 12, 1898. 1 frame.

0913                Essay on Texas Indians, Undated. 3 frames.

0916                Essay on  Juan Nepomuceno Almonte, Undated. 9

frames.

0925                Note on Omission of Transcript of Essay on

Almonte. 1 frame.

0926                Printed Material, Undated. 2 frames.

0928                Muster Rolls, April [?]- December 24, 1864. 6

frames.

0934                [Untitled Folder-Monthly Returns, August,

December 1861, August 1862, Commissioned Officers Present and Absent, January 31, 1861, June 1862]. 10 frames.

0944                Abstract of Articles Transferred and Officer

Present, 1862. 3 frames.

0947                Military Orders, May 11, 1861-March 3, 1864. 18

frames.

0965                [Untitled Folder-Quartermaster’s Report,

February 29, 1864]. 3 frames.

0968                Quartermaster’s Reports, November 4, 1861- July

1864. 15 frames.

0983                [Untitled Folder-Quartermaster’s Report, March

31, 1864]. 5 frames.

0988                Receipts, June 1, 1862-January 1, 1864, and

Undated. 9 frames.

0997                [Untitled Folder-Monthly Statement of Funds

Received and Disbursed at Fort Clark, Texas, February 1863]. 4 frames.

1001                Soldier’s Certificates of Disability, September 24,

1863-February 11, 1864. 9 frames.

1010                Inventory of Personal Effects of Norman Grisham,

Deceased, January 2, 186[?]. 3 frames.

1013                [Untitled Folder-Photographs]. 3 frames.

 

Howe, Milton G. Papers, 1844 and 1863-1900 [Beaumont, Brazoria County, Columbia, Galveston, Hinkle’s Ferry, Houston, Liberty, Sabine City, San Antonio, Sherman, and Velasco, Texas; also Louisiana] Location: Reel 19 and 20; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection consists of correspondence, receipts, property tax notices, maps, newspaper clippings, photographs, military papers and order, quartermaster’s records and reports, muster rolls, a discharge, a commission, a parole, and an amnesty oath relating to Howe’s service as a captain in the First Engineers Battalion of the Confederate Army.

1016                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

1021                Omissions List. 2 frames.

1023                Correspondence, G. W. Hill, U. S. Secretary of

War, Reply to the Citizens of Milam County, Texas, June 24, 1844, regarding Indian Depredations. 4 frames.

1027                Map of Howe Property, Galveston, Texas,

Undated. 3 frames.

1030                [Untitled Folder-List of Bounty, Donation, and

headright Certificates, 1846]. 4 frames.

1034                Power of Attorney, March 7, 1864. 2 frames.

1036                Photographs, “Caroline and Son John, 11 days.” 1

frame.

1037                Photographs, “Our House from the McHenry

Corner the Day After the Storm.” 3 frames.

1040                General and Special Orders, September 8, 1862

March 28, 1865. 83 frames.

Reel 20

0003                Military Correspondence, January 17, 1863-March

31, 1864. 118 frames.

0121                Military Correspondence, April 2, 1864-February

16, 1865, and Undated. 121 frames.

0242                Quartermaster’s Records, June 3-December 27,

1862. 24 frames.

0266                Quartermaster’s Records, June 3, 1863-May 2,

1865. 85 frames.

0351                [Untitled Folder-Muster Rolls, July 1, 1862-March

11, 1865]. 167 frames.

0518                Descriptive Roll of Enlisted Men Transferred to

the 1st Engineers Battalion, March 1864. 1 frame.

0519                Report of Negroes Employed in the Construction

of Pontoon Bridges on the San Bernard River, January 4-March 10, 1864. 10 frames.

0529                Descriptive List of Negroes Assigned to the

Engineering Department, April 24-28, 1865. 4 frames.

0533                J. W. Ravenna, Soldier’s Discharge, May 24, 1865.

2 frames.

0535                Milton G. Howe Commission, April 30, 1864. 2

frames.

0537                Milton G. Howe Parole, June 21, 1865. 2 frames.

0539                Milton G. Howe Amnesty Oath, June 28, 1865. 2

frames.

0541                Map, Cedar Bayou, Undated. 1 frame.

0542                Diagram and Notes on Pontoon Bridges, 1864. 6

frames.

0548                Maps and Diagrams, [Undated]. 5 frames.

0553                Omissions List. 1 frame.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Howell, W. Randolph Papers, 1861-1879 [Anderson, Galveston, Gonzales, Grimes County, Hall’s Bluff, Hempstead, Henderson, Houston, Navasota, Plantersville, Rusk County, and San Antonio, Texas; also Louisiana and New Mexico] Location: Reel 20; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection consists of correspondence, a diary, and clippings relating to Howell, who served in the 2nd Regiment of Sibley’s Brigade, Confederate Army.

0554                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0559                Correspondence, 1861-1879. 76 frames.

0635                Diary, [April 30, 1861-February 12, 1862]. 60

frames.

0695                Diary, 1863-1865. 43 frames.

 

Hudson, Franklin A. Diaries, 1853-1859, Iberville Parish, Louisiana; Reel 12 Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations

            In the 1850s, Franklin A. Hudson was the owner of Blythewood Plantation on Bayou Goula, Iberville Parish, Louisiana.

            The collection consists of seven volumes of a diary kept by Franklin A. Hudson, 1852-1857 and 1859, and of a typed transcription of these volumes. There is no volume in the collection for 1858.

            Entries relate chiefly to the cultivation and processing of sugar cane, corn, and other crops, such as peas and sweet potatoes. Hudson mentioned other plantation activities, including work on buildings, fences, cooperage, bayous, and roads. He frequently mentioned the weather and often referred to his overseers.

            There also are frequent references to slaves and their care. Entries refer to purchasing slaves’ clothing, providing their housing, treating their illnesses, and providing physicians to attend them. There also are references to physicians attending members of Hudson’s own family, and to medicines and cures. Hudson mentioned a minister who came frequently to preach to the slaves.

            There also are references to social affairs and to neighbors, including the Randolphs, the Vaughans, and Louisiana governor Paul Octave Hébert. Hudson wrote of frequent trips on the Mississippi River, giving names of boats and a few details of travel, as well as listing expenses. He also made brief entries giving bare details of visits, traveling by water and otherwise, to Ohio, to New York where his mother lived at Fort Plain, and, in July—August 1859, to Canada.

            Hudson occasionally mentioned church attendance while at home and on trips. He kept records of contributions he made to church collections.

            Hudson also kept financial accounts in these diaries. Many daily entries list amounts paid out for goods and services, such as “Paid for butter .20,” “Charge Overseer for 25 lbs meat @ .7 ½,” and “Cash to wife ----2.00.” In later volumes, in addition to such entries, Hudson kept cash accounts separately in the back of the book, showing amounts received and amounts paid.

 

Biographical Note

            In the 1850s and 1860s, Franklin A. Hudson (fl. 1852-1871), owned, and lived at, Blythewood Plantation on Bayou Goula in Iberville Parish, Louisiana, near White Castle. He was a neighbor of John Hampden Randolph, who owned Nottoway Plantation.

            In 1858 or 1859, Hudson sold half of his interest in Blythewood to Randolph, and the plantation was operated by the two in partnership until 1871, when Randolph acquired full ownership.

            N.B. For biographical information on Franklin A. Hudson, see Paul E. Postell, “John Hampden Randolph,” M.A. thesis, Louisiana State University, 1936.

            A related collection among the holdings of the Southern Historical Collection is the George H. Murrell Paper.

            Another related collection exists among the holdings of the Louisiana State University Libraries, where the John H. Randolph Papers include material regarding the partnership between Franklin A. Hudson and John H. Randolph. This collection is included in UPA’s Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War, Series l, Part 1.

0282                Introductory Materials. 8 frames.

Original Diaries

0290                Folder 1, Volume 1, 1852. 74 frames.

0364                Folder 2, Volume 2, 1853. 73 frames.

0437                Folder 3, Volume 3, 1854. 80 frames.

0517                Folder 4, Volume 4, 1855. 96 frames.

0613                Folder 5, Volume 5, 1856. 95 frames.

0708                Folder 6, Volume 6, 1857. 95 frames.

0803                Folder 7, Volume 7, 1859. 92 frames.

0895                Folder 8, Volume I, 1852-1853. 75 frames.

0970                Folder 9, Volume II, 1854-1856. 189 frames.

Reel 13

0001                Folder 10, Volume III, 1857, 1859. 177 frames.

 

Hudson, Franklin A. Diaries cont. Typed Transcriptions of Diaries, 1852-1859 cont. Reel 13 Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations

            Folder 10, Volume lll, 1857, 1859. 177 frames.

 

Hunter, Nathaniel Wych and Malcolm Kenmore Hunter Family Papers, 1860-1877 [1887] [Columbus, Eagle Pass, Fort Bliss, Fort Duncan, Galveston, Independence, Palestine, San Antonio, and San Marcos, Texas; also Kentucky, Louisiana, and New Mexico] Location: Reel 20; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            These papers consist of correspondence relating to the Hunter family. Much of the correspondence relates to the Hunters’ service in the Confederate Army and to military operations in New Mexico and Arizona. Also includes material on the Battle of Springfield, Missouri.

0738                Introductory Materials. 6 frames.

0744                [Correspondence], 1860-1887. 55 frames.

 

Hunter-Taylor Family Papers, Mss. 3024, 1848-1899 [East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana; also Mississippi Georgia, and Ohio].  Reel 9 Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            The Hunter and Taylor families were residents of East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana. Sereno Taylor (1794-1867) was a minister and principal of Silliman Female College Institute in Clinton, Louisiana.  He was married to Mary Emerson Creed Taylor (1798-1870); their daughter, Stella Bradley Taylor (1834-1924), married Samuel Eugene Hunter (1832-1870), who was made a colonel in the 4th Louisiana Regiment of the Confederate army, January 1863.

            This collection consists of 346 items and six volumes.  Correspondence includes letters of Sereno Taylor and Mary Emerson Creed Taylor concerning family and social matters, education at Silliman Institute, and the Civil War.  Letters of Stella Bradley Taylor and Samuel Eugene Hunter pertain to family and social subjects and include letters written by Samuel during his service as colonel in the 4th Louisiana Regiment; the letters concern military service in Mississippi and Georgia and experiences as a prisoner of war in Johnson’s Island Prison, Sandusky, Ohio.  Included is a list of casualties of the 4th Louisiana Regiment and a roll of the “Hunter Rifles.”  Family papers include miscellaneous financial and legal documents, papers concerning the Silliman Institute, poetry, and an unidentified photograph.  One diary and four items record journal entries of Mary Emerson Creed Taylor, 1860-1864.  An anonymous travel diary, 1862-1863, documents a tour of Europe, focusing on France and Italy.

            A list of omissions from Hunter-Taylor Family Papers, Mss. 3024, 1848-1899, is provided on Reel 10, Frame 0049.

0204                Introductory Materials. 13 frames.

0217                Folder 1, Correspondence, 1848-1859. 99 frames.

0316                Folder 2, Correspondence, 1860-1861. 43 frames.

0359                Folder 3, Correspondence, 1862. 48 frames.

0407                Folder 4, Correspondence, 1863. 81 frames.

0488                Folder 5, Correspondence, 1864. 123 frames.

0611                Folder 6, Correspondence, 1865. 98 frames.

0709                Folder 7, Correspondence, 1866-1883. 74 frames.

0783                Folder 8, Correspondence, Undated. 73 frames.

0856                Folder 10, Photograph, Undated. 73 frames.

0858                Folder 15, Travel Journal, 1862-1863. 28 frames.

0886                Folder 16, Mary E. Taylor Diary, 1860-1864. 102

frames.

Reel 10

0001                Folder 17, Mary E. Taylor Diary, 1868. 28 frames.

0029                Folder 18, Sarah G. Brown Papers, Typed

Transcription of Mary E. Taylor Diary, 1861-1864. 20 frames.

0049                List of Omissions from Hunter-Taylor Family

Papers, Mss. 3024, 1848-1899. 1 frame

 

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J

Jackson, Riddle, and Company Papers, 1835-1839, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; also Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New York, North Carolina, and Tennessee.  Location:  Reel 19, Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations. 

            Jackson, Riddle & Company were commission merchants of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Liverpool, England.  The firm, which later became Jackson, Todd, & Co., dealt in the sale of cotton, sugar, tobacco, sheet iron, nails, and coal.  Washington Jackson was principal owner, and his son, Bolton Jackson, oversaw operations in Liverpool.  The company, which received some of its financing from the Bank of the United States, carried on business with clients and associates in the Northeastern and Southern states, England, and France.

            This collection contains business letters received by Jackson, Riddle, & Co. (1836-1838) and Jackson, Todd, & Co. (1838-1839); about one-half are letters from other commission merchants, including Byrne Hermann & Co. of New Orleans; Daniel Buchanan & Son of Liverpool; Nevins Townsend & Co., Thomas Barrett & Co., and W. J. Brown & Co. of New York; and William Ferriday & Co. of Natchez, Mississippi.  Other frequent correspondents are Stephen Duncan and John Ker, planters of Natchez, Mississippi; other planters in Mississippi and Louisiana; Edward Brook and Kennis Whitaker Co., iron makers of Birdsborough Forge and Reading, Pennsylvania, respectively; Isaac Brooks, retail merchant of Baltimore, Maryland; and George Dickey, stock broker of New York.  Letters discuss crop outlooks, agricultural prices, stock market trends, and domestic and international trade.  Other topics of interest are France’s refusal to pay claims by American shippers for vessels seized by Napoleon and the great fire of 1835 in New York City’s financial district.

            The letters in this collection are particularly useful for the study of early nineteenth-century agricultural market conditions, the nascent iron industry in Pennsylvania, stock market trends, domestic trade networks, and trade relations with France.

            Limited information appears on Washington Jackson’s personal finances, and none appears on his family or social life.  The activities of Jackson’s partners, Riddle and Todd, find no mention in the letters.  Likewise, only limited information emerges on the letters’ authors, who rarely strayed from discussion of immediate business concerns.

 

Biographical Note

            Washington Jackson (fl. 1835-1855), commission merchant, ran, along with his partners, Riddle and Todd, a diverse business in agricultural and hardware products.  His company, Jackson, Riddle & Co., which became Jackson, Todd, & Co. in late 1838, operated out of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, with a branch in Liverpool, England.  Jackson’s sons, Bolton Jackson, went to England to establish operations there in January 1838.  Jackson and his partners sold sugar, tobacco, and cotton produced by southern (mostly Mississippi and Louisiana) planters, and purchased northern-produced sheet iron, nails, and other hardware items and coal for resale to planters and to southern and northern retail merchants, manufacturers, and railroad builders.  The company carried on business with individuals and firms in New York, Pennsylvania, Mississippi, Louisiana, Maryland, North Carolina, and Tennessee.  Limited international trade consisted of the importation of French foodstuffs from J. H. Boyer & Co. of Bordeaux and of English iron for use by Pennsylvania nailmakers.

            Letters from 1838 indicate that Jackson, Riddle & Co. received some of its financing through loans from the Bank of the United States.  Jackson also invested frequently in the stock market through his broker, George Dickey, of New York.

            Jackson maintained close ties with a number of other commission merchants, including Byrne Hermann & Co. of New Orleans; Daniel Buchanan & Son of Liverpool; Nevins Townsend & Co., Thomas Barrett & Co. and W. J. Brown & Co. of New York; and William Ferriday & Co. of Natchez, Mississippi.  Planters for whom Jackson’s firm carried out commission sales included Dr. Stephen Duncan and John Ker of Natchez, Mississippi.  Edward Brook and Kennis Whitaker Co., iron makers of Birdsborough Forge and Reading, Pennsylvania, respectively, provided Jackson with most of the iron he purchased for resale.  Isaac Brooks, who appears to have been his largest hardware customer, was a retail merchant in Baltimore, Maryland.

0001                Introductory Materials. 13 frames.

0014                Folder 1, January 8-December 26, 1835. 61

frames.

0075                Folder 2, January 2-February 27, 1836. 55

frames.

0130                Folder 3, March 3-31, 1836. 44 frames.

0174                Folder 4, April 2-June 27, 1836.         68 frames.

0242                Folder 5, July 4-August 29, 1836. 31 frames.

0287                Folder 6, September 1-29, 1836. 31 frames.

0318                Folder 7, October 7-December 22, 1836. 60

frames.

0378                Folder 8, January 16-December 22, 1836. 60

frames.

0408                Folder 9, January 10-March 27, 1838. 46 frames.

0454                Folder 10, April 8-June 23, 1838. 45 frames.

0499                Folder 11, July 8-November 27, 1838. 37 frames.

0536                Folder 12, December 1-27, 1838. 25 frames.

0561                Folder 13, January 17-June 8, 1839. 48 frames.

0609                Folder 14, July 9-October 28, 1839. 47 frames.

0656                Folder 15, November 14-December 21, 1839. 17

frames.

 

Johnson, Benjamin W. Letter, Confederate States Army Collection (D), Mss. 545, 1863 [Port Hudson, Louisiana; also Arkansas]. Location:  Reel 3, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of one item, a letter, 12 September 1863, of Benjamin W. Johnson, a colonel of the 15th Arkansas Infantry Regiment.  The letter was written from “Prison No. 8 Custom House” to T. F. Wilson, an assistant adjutant general, and reports the part played by Johnson’s command in defense of Fort Desperate in the Battle of Port Hudson, Louisiana.

0102                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0105                Letter, 12 September 1863. 15 frames.

 

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K

Kauffman-Howe Family Papers, 1855-1865 [Texas; also Louisiana] Location: Reel 25; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            The correspondence in this collection relates to the Kauffman and Howe families of Galveston, Texas, and to the activities of William F. Howe and C. P. Howe in Louisiana and Texas during the Civil War.

0760                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0464                Correspondence, 1855-1864. 27 frames.

 

Kleinpeter, George and Family Papers, Mss. 864, 1029, 1804-1918 [East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana; also North Carolina and Virginia].  Location:  Reel 11, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            George Kleinpeter was a farmer of East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana.  He and Augustine Daigre married about 1830, and they had at least four children – William, George Augustin, Alice, and Joseph.

            This collection consists of eighty-five items and three volumes, papers, 1804-1918, of George Kleinpeter and family.  Personal papers include Civil War letters to “Mother” from William and George Augustin Kleinpeter from Confederate army camps to Virginia and North Carolina.  Letters from Alice Kleinpeter McGloin’s children, Frank McGloin Jr., Alice and Nellie, and others primarily discuss family matters.  Legal documents consist of deeds in Spanish, the division of Paul Daigre’s estate; an 1860 census of Daphne Grove; and a framed certification, 1876, by the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia of George Augustin Kleinpeter’s service in the Confederate army.  Financial items include tax and other receipts ; statements of accounts for cotton and other goods; promissory notes; receipts for tuition of William Kleinpeter at St. Peter and St. Paul College, 1854, and of Alice Kleinpeter at St. Mary Academy, 1859-1863, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

            A list of omissions from George Kleinpeter and Family Papers, Mss. 864, 1029, 1804-1918, is provided on Reel 11, Frame 0310.  Omissions consist of Volumes 1-3, containing financial records of expenditures, 1844-1846, for various household and other goods and laborers accounts, 1840 and 1850.

0182                Introductory Materials. 10 frames.

0192                Folder 1, Papers, 1806-1830. 19 frames.

0211                Folder 2, Papers, 1833-1860 and Undated. 31

frames.

0242                Folder 3, Papers, 1861-1918 and Undated. 66

frames.

0308                Oversized Folder, Certificate, 1876. 2 frames.

0310                List of Omissions from George Kleinpeter and

Family Papers, Mss. 864, 1029, 1804-1918. 1 frame.

 

Kenner Family Papers, Mss. 775, 1844-1892 [Jefferson and St. Charles Parishes, Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 10, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Members of the Kenner family lived on Oakland Plantation, Jefferson Parish, Louisiana, and on Roseland Plantation, St. Charles Parish, Louisiana.  Both were sugar and rice plantations.

            This collection consists of forty-nine items and eight volumes.  Items pertaining to the William B. Kenner family consist of personal correspondence, including letters of his grandson, Lt. Philip Minor Kenner, during his service in the Confederate States Army.  Correspondence of Charles Oxley and Martha Kenner Oxley concerns Roseland Plantation.

            A list of omissions from Kenner Family Papers, Mss. 775, 1844-1892, is provided on Reel 10, Frame 0825.  Omissions consist of Volumes 1-8, plantation diaries and memorandum books of William B. Kenner and Charles Oxley.

0689                Introductory Materials. 8 frames.

0697                Folder 1, papers, 1846-1856. 17 frames.

0714                Folder 2, Papers, 1860-1868. 22 frames.

0736                Folder 3, Papers, 1870-1872 and 1880-1889. 58

frames.

0794                Folder 4, Papers, 1890 and 1892. 29 frames.

0823                Folder 5, Photograph, Undated. 2 frames.

0825                List of Omissions from Kenner Family Papers,

Mss. 775, 1844-1892. 1 frame.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ker, William H. Letters, Mss. 888, 1861-1864 [Adams County, Mississippi; also Alabama, Georgia and Virginia].  Location:  Reel 10, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            William H. Ker (1841-1902) was a Confederate private in Company A of the Jefferson Davis Legion, Mississippi Cavalry, under the command of Major William T. Martin.  He was the son of Dr. John Ker, owner of Linden Plantation in Natchez, Mississippi, and vice president of the American Colonization Society.

            This collection consists of eleven items, letters, 1861-1864, of William H. Ker.  William H. Ker’s letters to his sister, Mrs. Sarah Ker Butler, relate his observations and reflections during his service in the Jefferson Davis Legion in Virginia, Alabama, and Georgia.  Letters, 1862-1863, written in Virginia relate Ker’s opinions of Maj. Martin’s treatment of soldiers.  Letters, 1863, from Woodlawn Plantation near Marion, Alabama, describe the hospitality of the local people among whom the troops were quartered.  Letters, 1863, from Columbus, Georgia, comment on the military situation at Vicksburg, Mississippi, and the quality of Gen. Pemberton’s leadership.  A letter, 18 July 1863, from Martinsburg, Virginia [now West Virginia], describes Confederate military strategy at the Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  Ker’s last letters, 1864, reflect the Confederate troops’ optimism after the Battle of Chickamauga, Georgia.

            N.B.  A related collection among the holdings of the Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections, Hill Memorial Library, Louisiana State University Libraries is John Ker and Family Papers, Mss. 3539, 1803-1862, included in UPA’s Southern Women and Their Families in the 19th Century:  Papers and Diaries, Series E.  Another related collection among the holdings of the Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections, Hill Memorial Library, Louisiana State University Libraries is the Thomas W. Butler Papers, 1842-1913, included in UPA’s Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War, Series I, Part 5.  A related collection among the holdings of the Southern Historical Collection, Manuscripts Department , Academic Affairs Library of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the Mary Susan Ker Papers, 1785-1923, included in UPA’s Southern Women and their Families in the 19th Century:  Papers and Diaries, Series A, Part 1.

0826                Introductory Materials. 7 frames.

0833                Papers, 1861-1864. 51 frames.

 

Kilbourne, James Gilliam Family Collection, Mss. 690, 730, 1838-1899 [East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 11, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            The Kilbourne family resided in Clinton, East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, at their residence Bonnie Burn.  James Gilliam Kilbourne (1828-1893), planter, jurist, legislator, Confederate captain, and member of the law firm of Fuqua and Kilbourne, was born in Hinds County, Mississippi.  He attended Centenary College in Jackson, Louisiana, and married Almena Leonora Perkins in 1851.  They had ten children, including Mary Octavia (1852-1881), James (1854-1924), Charles (1856-1937), Henry Gilliam (1858-1888), Lewis Perkins (1860-1912), Emma (b. 1862), Susan Gilliam (1864-1913), and Lillian (1868-1949).

            This collection consists of 565 items and forty-three volumes, personal and business papers, 1838-1899, of three generations of the Kilbourne family.  Early papers consist of letters and documents relating to James Gilliam Kilbourne’s work as attorney for the Clinton and Port Hudson Railroad.  Civil War letters from him to his wife while encamped in Mississippi mention army personnel and describe camp life and morale.  A muster roll of Captain E. J. Pullen’s Company K of the 4th Regiment of Louisiana Volunteers, 1861-1862, shows names of those wounded and killed at the Battle of Shiloh and from other causes.  An oversize folder contains fifteen muster rolls for the 4th Regiment of Louisiana Volunteers, 1861.

            A list of Omissions from James Gilliam Kilbourne Family Collection, Mss. 690, 730, 1838-1899, is provided on Reel 11, Frame 0181. Omissions consist of Papers, 1870-1899, and Volumes 1-43.

0001                Introductory Materials. 6 frames.

0007                Folder 1, Papers, 1838. 30 frames.

0037                Folder 2, Papers, 1850-1853. 21 frames.

0058                Folder 3, Papers, 1856-1869. 49 frames.

0107                Oversize Folder 1, Muster Rolls, 4th Regiment,

Louisiana Volunteers, CSA, 1861. 74 frames.

0181                List of Omissions from James Gilliam Kilbourne

Family Collection. Mss. 690, 730, 1838-1899. 1 frame.

 

Knighton, Josiah Family Papers, Mss. 6511, 1796-1868 [East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana; also Georgia, Mississippi, and Tennessee].  Location:  Reel 11, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Josiah Knighton (1796-1868) lived with his family in Clinton, East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana.  Family members James H. Knighton, a private in Company G of the 4th Louisiana Infantry during the Civil War, enlisted at Camp Neafus on 29 July 1861. 

            This collection consists of 270 items and four volumes, papers, 1793-1909, of Josiah Knighton and family.  The collection contains some legal and financial documents, educational materials, and printed items.  Civil War letters of James H. Knighton, 1861-1865, describe Camp Neafus; Camp Lovell; Confederate deserters, camp life; campaigns at Vicksburg, Mississippi, and Atlanta, Georgia; the Battle of Shiloh; the release of Confederate prisoner of war Roy Brown, 1865; and the operations of the 4th Louisiana Infantry and the 9th Tennessee Cavalry Battery.  Letters, 1867-1886, describe a promotion for the railroad line from Fort Smith, Arkansas, to Alexandria, Louisiana; the Chinese population of Lake Providence, East Carroll Parish, Louisiana; Reconstruction and African American voters; the Democratic Party; and the Knights of Pythias.  Legal and financial papers include affidavits establishing ownership of slaves; property mortgages; loan applications, 1820-1839; the succession of Gerhard Koch; and papers documenting the transfer of land to Mrs. Elizabeth Koch and heirs.

            A list of omissions from Josiah Knighton Family Papers, Mss. 6511, 1796-1868, is provided on Reel 11, Frame 0764. Omissions consist of Volumes 1-4, School Notebooks.

0311                Introductory Materials. 8 frames.

0319                Folder 1, Papers, 1793 and 1808-1833. 36

frames.

0355                Folder 2, Papers, 1842-1860. 32 frames.

0387                Folder 3, Papers, 1861-1864. 119 frames.

0506                Folder 4, Papers, 1865-1875. 57 frames.

0563                Folder 5, Papers, 1877-1885. 67 frames.

0630                Folder 6, Papers, 1886-1896. 36 frames.

0666                Folder 7, Postal Cards, 1888-1896. 27 frames.

0693                Folder 8, Papers, 1897-1909 and Undated. 31

frames.

0724                Folder 9, Papers, Undated. 19 frames.

0743                Folder 10, Genealogy, Undated. 7 frames.

0750                Folder 11, Newspaper Clippings, 1870-1874 and

Undated. 12 frames.

0762                Folder 12, Picture and Cards, 1875 and Undated.

2 frames.

0764                List of Omissions from Josiah Knighton Family

Papers, Mss. 6511, 1796-1868. 1 frame.

 

Knox, J. P. Family Papers, Mss. 715, 1851-1921 [East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana; also Mississippi].  Location:  Reels 11 and 12, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            The Knox family resided in Clinton, East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, where they grew cotton and owned the Clinton Brick and Tile Co. and the East Louisiana Land Investment Co. Granville L. Alspaugh (1845-1863) served in Company A, 27th Louisiana Volunteers Regiment of the Confederate States Army.

            This collection consists of papers, 1851-1921, of J.P. Knox and family.  Letters, 1861-1863, of Granville L. Alspaugh to his mother, Amelia F. Alspaugh, of Clinton, Louisiana, describe his service in the Confederate States Army at Vicksburg, Mississippi.

            A list of omissions from J. P. Knox Family Papers, Mss. 715, 1851-1921, is provided on Reel 12, Frame 0105. Omissions consist of postwar Knox items including Folders 4-28, 1880-1921, Volumes, and Printed Matter.

0765                Introductory Materials. 13 frames.

0778                Folder 1, Papers, 1851 and 1860-1862. 63

frames.

0841                Folder 2, Papers, 1863-1867. 40 frames.

0881                Folder 3, Papers, 1870-1878. 8 frames.

Reel 12

 

 

0001                Folder 29, Undated. 104 frames.

0105                List of Omissions from J. P. Knox Family Papers,

Mss. 715, 1851-1921. 1 frame.

 

 

 

Kuechler, Jacob Papers, 1840-1907 [Texas] Location: Reel 20; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            These papers consist of a description of the Battle of Nueces in 1862.

0799                Introductory Materials 3 frames.

0802                Omissions List. 2 frames.

0804                Miscellaneous Papers-Memorial Address, Biographical Data, Customs Office Report, Texas-New Mexico Boundary Report, Legislative Items. 3 frames.

 

Kuykendall, James [Jonathan] Hampton Papers, 1822-1897 [Texas] Location: Reel 20; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            These papers relate to Jonathan Hampton and William Kuykendall and their families. The collection includes diaries, reminiscences, poetry, biographical recollections, and notebooks and has additional material on Kuykendall’s service in the Confederate Army on the Rio Grande.

0807                Introductory Materials. 7 frames.

0814                Omissions List. 1 frame.

0815                Inventory. 1 frame.

0816                Jonathan Hampton Kuykendall: Diaries and

Reminiscences, 1862-1866. 134 frames.

0950                Original Notebooks: Jonathan Hampton

Kuykendall: Book Number 2. 98 frames.

1048                Original Notebooks: Jonathan Hampton

Kuykendall: Book Number 13. 16 frames.

1064                Correspondence, 1862. 43 frames.

 

 

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L

Lambert, N. Letters, Mss. 2133, 1864 [East Pascagoula, Mississippi; also Louisiana]. Location:  Reel 12, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of two items, letters, 1864, of N. Lambert to his cousin, Leda Hincks of New Orleans, Louisiana.  The letters, in French, comment on the sufferings of Confederate refugees in the area; the arrival of exiles from New Orleans; the effects of displacement; and the empathy of Mrs. Louis Gurlie, Adm. Farragut’s sister.  Lambert requests Hincks to send him noncontraband articles such as perique, tobacco, cloth, and stationery. 

0106                Introductory Materials. 7 frames.

0113                Papers, 1864. 11 frames.

 

Lance, Samuel J. Papers, Mss. 616, 1861-1864 [Buncombe County, North Carolina; also Mississippi, Tennessee, South Carolina, and Illinois].  Location:  Reel 12, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of nine items, letters, 1861-1864, from Samuel J. Lance’s sons during their service in the Confederate States Army.  Letters were written from camps in Mississippi, Tennessee, and South Carolina.  One letter by John B. Vance was written from a Federal prison in Rock Island, Illinois. 

0124                Introductory Materials. 7 frames.

0131                Papers, 1861-1864. 20 frames.

 

Lauve, Gustave Letter, Mss. 893, 1863 [Iberville and Caddo Parishes, Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 21A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of one item, a letter, 26 June 1863, to Gustave Lauve.  The letter is written to Lauve from Oscar [otherwise unidentified] of Bayou Plaquemine, Iberville Parish, Louisiana.  It describes pillage and destruction by the Federal army in Iberville Parish, movements of Confederate States Army troops in Louisiana, the situation concerning runaway slaves and treatment of slaves by the Federal army, and family news.

0389                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0392                Letter, 1863. 5 frames.

 

Lawrence and Brashear Family Papers, 1804-1982, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana; also Kentucky and New York.  Location:  Reel 7, 8, 9 and 10, Antebellum Southern Plantations.

            Walter Brashear (1776-1860) was a physician in Kentucky before 1822 when he moved to St. Mary Parish, Louisiana, where he became a sugar planter and state legislator after acquiring Belle Island Plantation and other landholdings in the area.  The family of Effingham Lawrence (d.1859) and Ann Townsend Lawrence (fl. 1802-1830s) lived in Bayside, New York, until sons Robert (fl. 1820s-1850s), Samuel Townsend (d. 1839), Henry Effingham (1809-1876?), and Effingham, Jr. (1820?-1878) moved to New Orleans to take up merchandizing and sugar planting.  Henry Effingham Lawrence married Frances Emily Brashear, daughter of Walter and Margaret Barr Brashear, in 1844.

            This collection contains correspondence among members of the Brashear, Lawrence, and related Barr, Parker, Clay, Tilton, and Townsend families.  Subjects include observations while traveling in Ohio, Pennsylvania (especially Pittsburgh), and Mississippi in the 1820s and 1830s; physician Walter Brashear’s life in Lexington, Kentucky, in the 1820s and 1830s; sugar growing, slavery, and medical care in St. Mary Parish, Louisiana; Louisiana politics, especially in the 1840s; and various aspects of the Confederacy.  Letters from the Lawrence brothers in New Orleans to their relatives in New York in the 1820s offer observations by Northerners on life in the South.  Civil War correspondence and the diary of Henry Effingham Lawrence refer in some detail to military operations and the effects of the war in St. Mary Parish and, more generally, to events throughout the country.  Correspondence with the Lawrence children at the Louisiana Institute for the Deaf and the Dumb, and the Blind at Baton Rouge, the Whipple School at Mystic River, Connecticut, Miss Bolton’s School at Middletown, Connecticut, and the Hellmuth Ladies School at London, Ontario, Canada, concerns school, social life, and family matters in the 1860s and 1870s.  There are also scattered financial and legal materials ; miscellaneous writings, and other materials.

 

Biographical Note.  Walter Brashear (1776-1860), was a surgeon, sugar-planter, an exporter of ginseng to China, and, beginning in 1834, member of the Louisiana legislature.  Though born in Maryland, he was raised and lived in Bardstown, Nelson County, Kentucky, until 1822, when he moved to St. Mary Parish (Attakapas region), Louisiana.  He acquired extensive landholdings in the area, including Belle Island Plantation, and what was known in the 1860s as the Town of Brashear or Brashear City, now Morgan City.  A sketch of Walter Brashear appears in the Filson Club Quarterly, XXVII, p. 156-157.

            Margaret Barr (1781-1834) of Kentucky married Walter Brashear in 1803.  The Brashears had at least six children:  Mary Eliza, Rebecca Tilton, Carolina Imly, Walter B. Thomas Todd (d. 1858) and Frances Emily (1819-1895) who married Henry Effingham Lawrence (1809-1876?) in 1844. 

            Henry E. Lawrence was the son of Ann Townsend (fl. 1802-1830s) and Judge Effingham Lawrence (fl. 1802-d. 1850) of Bayside, Long Island, New York.  (Among his siblings were Samuel Townsend [fl. 1820s-1839], Robert [fl. 1820s-1859], and Effingham, Jr. [1820?-1878].  He moved from Long Island to New Orleans about 1836, became a merchant, acquired Magnolia Plantation, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, and, after marrying Frances E. Brashear, became associated with the Brashear landholdings in St. Mary Parish.

            Henry and Frances Lawrence had seven children, six of whom were Walter B., Townsend B. (“Towny”), Robert B. (“Bob”), Nancy B., Lydia B., and Margaret (“Maggie”).  Five of these children were deaf-mutes.  Frances Brashear moved to Long Island, New York, during the Civil War and lived on the Brashear plantations with various of her children in later years.

0861                Introductory Materials. 17 frames.

Subseries 1.1.1

0878                Description of Subseries 1.1.1. 1 frame.

0879                Folder 1, 1802-1818. 45 frames.

0924                Folder 2, 1821-1823. 60 frames.

0984                Folder 3, 1824-1828. 25 frames.

1009                Folder 4, 1829-1830. 35 frames.

Reel 8

Subseries 1.1.1

0001                Folder 5, 1831-1832. 38 frames.

0039                Folder 6, 1833-1834. 43 frames.

0082                Folder 7, 1835-1837. 46 frames.

0128                Folder 8, 1838-1843. 41 frames.

Subseries 1.1.2

0169                Description of Subseries 1.1.2. 1 frame.

0170                Folder 9, 1802-1808. 53 frames.

0223                Folder 10, 1818. 16 frames.

0239                Folder 11, June 1820. 54 frames.

0293                Folder 12, July 1820. 28 frames.

0321                Folder 13, 1821-1824. 29 frames.

0350                Folder 14, 1825-1827. 27 frames.

0377                Folder 15, 1829-1834. 40 frames.

0417                Folder 16, 1835-1837. 74 frames.

0491                Folder 17, 1838. 61 frames.

0552                Folder 18, 1839-1840. 58 frames.

0611                Folder 19, 1841-1843. 62 frames.

Subseries 1.2

0673                Description of Subseries 1.2 1. frame.

0674                Folder 20, January- June 1844. 57 frames.

0731                Folder 21, July- December 1844. 58 frames.

0789                Folder 22, 1845. 85 frames.

0874                Folder 23, 1846-1848. 42 frames.

0916                Folder 24, January-February 1849. 57 frames.

0973                Folder 25, March-December 1849. 70 frames.

1043                Folder 26, 1850. 61 frames.

Reel 9

Subseries 1.2

0001                Folder 27, 1851. 67 frames.

0068                Folder 28, 1852-1853. 76 frames.

0144                Folder 29, 1854-1859. 80 frames.

0224                Folder 30, 1860. 42 frames.

Subseries 1.3

0266                Description of Subseries 1.3. 1 frame.

0267                Folder 31, 1861-1862. 54 frames.

0321                Folder 32, 1863. 65 frames.

0386                Folder 33, 1864. 60 frames.

0446                Folder 34, 1865. 81 frames.

Subseries 1.4

0527                Description of Subeseries 1.4

0528                Folder 35, 1866-1868. 70 frames.

0598                Folder 36, 1869-1870. 77 frames.

0675                Folder 37, 1871-1874. 88 frames.

0763                Folder 38, January-April 1875. 70 frames.

0833                Folder 39, June 1875-1887, 1897. 89 frames.

Subseries 1.5

0922                Description of Subseries 1.5. 1 frame.

0923                Folder 40, Undated. 45 frames.

Series 2

0968                Description of Series 2. 1 frame.

0969                Folder 41, 1803-1860. 36 frames.

1005                Folder 42, 1870-1874. 34 frames.

1039                Folder 43, Undated. 4 frames.

Reel 10

0001                Description of Series 3. 1 frame.

0002                Folder 44, Henry Effingham Lawrence, Diary,

1862- July 1863. 154 frames.

Series 4

0156                Description of Series 4. 1 frame

0157                Folder 45, Writings, ca. 1856-1858 and Undated.

38 frames.

0195                Folder 46, Printed Materials, 1892-1960 and

Undated. 61 frames.

0256                Folder 47, Eccles Register, 1982. 69 frames.

 

 

Lea, Lemanda E. Papers, Mss. 704, 1858-1872 [Liberty, Mississippi; also Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 21, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of fifty-seven items, papers, 1858-1872, of Lemanda Lea.  Correspondence includes letters from her mother, Sarah Sandel, of Pike County, Mississippi, and letters from Confederate States Army camps in Mississippi and Louisiana written by her husband, I. G. Lea, and her brothers, C. J. and W. G. Martin, describing conditions in camp, fortifications, plans for attack, and some information concerning the surrounding countryside.

            A list of omissions from Lemanda E. Lea Papers, Mss. 704, 1858-1872, is provided on Reel 21, Frame 0513.  Omissions consist of printed matter including a speech, 1890; minutes of the Union Baptist Association, 1896-1900; and Reminiscences of a Confederate Prisoner, Scott’s Cavalry, by Byron Smith, 1910.

0397                Introductory Materials. 13 frames.

0410                Folder 1, Papers, 1861-1862. 65 frames.

0475                Folder 2, Papers, 1862-1872. 38 frames.

0513                List of Omissions from Lemanda E. Lea Papers,

Mss. 704, 1858-1872. 1 frame.

 

LeBlanc, C.E. Papers, Mss. 1315, 1864-1865 [Columbus, Mississippi].  Location:  Reel 12, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of six items, papers, 1864-1865, of C. E. LeBlanc, deputy Confederate government agent for the purchase of cotton.  Papers concern the sale of certain Confederate property in Columbus, Mississippi, and its subsequent confiscation by a U.S. Treasury agent.  Additional items include a promissory note, a contract for the delivery of cotton, and a broadside announcing a lecture to be presented by J. D. B. DeBow in Columbus, Mississippi.

0151                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0156                Papers, 1864-1865. 11 frames.

 

 

 

Leet, Edwin Letters, Mss. 1353, 1864-1865 [Bayou Sara, West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana; also Alabama and Mississippi].  Location:  Reel 22A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Edwin Leet, from Bayou Sara, West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, was a Confederate States Army soldier of Company B, 3rd Louisiana Cavalry Regiment.

            This collection consists of five items, letters, 1864-1865, from Edwin Leet to his wife, Sarah A. Leet.  The letters, written from Liberty, Mississippi, relate personal and family news, as well as camp life and other Civil War-related activities.  A letter, 1865, written from Sumter County, Alabama, after Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox, Virginia, expresses doubt concerning optimistic war news announced by Confederate States Army officers.

0191                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0196                Letters, 1864-1865. 11 frames.

 

 

 

Lemke, W. J. Papers, 1858-1863 [Galveston County, Grayson County, Red River County, and Galveston, Texas; also Arkansas] Location: Reel 20; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            The Lemke papers contain statistics on Confederate hospitals in Arkansas as well as correspondence and a diary by Evan Atwood, who was a Confederate prisoner of war at Johnson’s Island, Ohio.

1107                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

1111                [Untitled Folder-Correspondence, War Bulletin,

Biographical Sketch of Evan Atwood, Atwood Diary, Newspaper Clippings]. 6 frames.

 

Leonard, Theodule Papers, Mss. 1209, 1841-1896 [West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana; also Kentucky].  Location:  Reel 12, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Theodule Leonard was a planter of Arright Plantation, West Feliciana Parish, and of Cat Island, near Morganza, Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana.  He was a tax collector and sheriff of West Feliciana Parish.  His son, John Baptist Theophile Leonard, attended St. Joseph’s College in Bardstown, Kentucky, and Louisiana State Seminary of Learning and Military Academy, Rapides Parish, Louisiana.

            This collection consists of 135 items, papers, 1841-1896, of Theodule Leonard.  Financial papers include promissory notes; items related to the collection of taxes; statements from New Orleans factors; an agreement with freedmen for African American plantation labor; bills and receipts for goods purchased; and land documents.  Two certificates appoint Theodule Leonard as constable for West Feliciana Parish, 1846, and as captain of Company O, West Feliciana Regiment, Louisiana Militia, 1861.  Correspondence includes letters from John B. Theophile Leonard concerning education and news from St. Joseph’s College and Louisiana State Seminary and Military Academy.  Some letters relate to a student prank and include a letter from William T. Sherman, concerning John B. Theophile Leonard’s conduct.  Civil War letters relate news concerning Confederate States Army maneuvers in the area of Columbus, Kentucky.  The collection includes a broadside, 1868, pertaining to the redemption of warrants by tax collectors.

0167                Introductory Materials. 8 frames.

0175                Folder 1, Papers, 1841-1851. 24 frames.

0199                Folder 2, Papers, 1852-1857. 28 frames.

0227                Folder 3, Papers, 1858-1860. 34 frames.

0261                Folder 4, Papers, 1861-1869 and Undated. 93

frames.

0354                Folder 5, Papers, 1870-1884 and 1896. 20

frames.

 

Leverich, Charles E., Mss. 791, 1863-1864 [New Orleans, Louisiana; also Georgia, Tennessee, and Virginia].  Location:  Reel 12, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Charles E. Leverich, a resident of New Orleans, Louisiana, served as sergeant in the 2nd Company of the Washington Artillery Battalion.  In 1863, he was discharged by the secretary of war of the Confederate States of America and made a first lieutenant in the provisional army.  With the Washington Artillery Battalion, Leverich had been present at battles and skirmishes at Yorktown, Mechanicsville, Rappahannock, Manassas, Chancellorsburg, and Williamsburg, Virginia; Sharpsburg, Maryland; and Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

            This collection consists of one item, a diary, 6 July 1863-21 September 1864, of Charles E. Leverich.  The diary records Leverich’s travels from Winchester to Richmond, Virginia, where he visited friends, and his stay with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William

E. Leverich (refugees from New Orleans), in Columbia County, Georgia.  Entries after 21 August 1863 describe Leverich’s activities as battery officer for Gen. Simon Bolivar Buckner under Gen. Braxton Bragg during the campaign near Chattanooga, Tennessee.  Described are the winter quarters of the Confederate army at Dalton and Oxford, Georgia, and the armies of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston and John B. Hood.  Names of civilians and military personnel are recorded along with changes to military posts, encounters with other units, and skirmishes with Federal troops during the campaigns of the Army of Tennessee in 1864.  Included is a roll call of the 4th Company of the Washington Artillery Battalion.

0374                Introductory Materials. 11 frames.

0384                Diary, 6 July 1863-21 September 1864. 57 frames.

 

Long, John Benjamin Papers, 1858-1924 [Rusk, Texas] Location: Reel 21; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            The John B. Long Papers consist of miscellaneous papers, legal documents, memos, accounts, correspondence, newspaper clippings, pamphlets, literary efforts, sermons, and a scrapbook.

0001                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0004                Omissions List. 1 frame.

0005                Inventory. 1 frame.

0006                Papers, 1858-1888. 230 frames.

 

Louisiana Confederate Pension Applications Collection from The Louisiana State Archives. Location Cabinet # 2, Drawers 1-6, Reels 1-152.

            This collection consists of Confederate pension applications for pensions that were granted to veterans and widows beginning in 1898. The applications include service information, occupation, place of residence, date of birth, number of children and more. A wide assortment of material is sometimes found within these applications such as letters, notes, copies of pension checks, newspaper clippings, court papers, obituaries, and more interesting papers.

 

            The original applications are located with the Louisiana State Archives, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. An index has been established by The Louisiana State Archive workers and can be accessed on The Louisiana State Archives web site. “The index contains over 49,000 names that were included in pension applications submitted to the Louisiana Board of Commissioners. The records were later transferred to the Archives after the last pension was paid in the 1950’s. More than 18,000 applications were microfilmed and are available to researchers at the Archives Library.”

 

 

Louisiana State Government, Records of, 1850-1888 (Rebel Archives), in the War Department Collection 24 rolls 16mm National Archives RG 109. M359 Location: YSC Microfilm cabinet 3, Drawer 5

On the 24 rolls of this microfilm publication are reproduced certain records of the Louisiana State Government for the period 1861-1865 with a few items dated in the 1850’s. Most of the records are for the first two or three years of the War. They were presumably included among State records surrendered at Shreveport, Louisiana, in June 1865 as explained in the introduction to the inventory mentioned below. They were transferred from the War Department to the National Archives in 1938 as part of the War Department Collection of Confederate Records (Record Group 109). They consist of eighteen document boxes of loose papers and eighty numbered volumes.

            The records are arranged in the order in which they are described in A Guide to the Records of the Louisiana State Government in the War Department Collection of Confederate Records… National Archives, compiled by Thomas J. Harrison, 1957. The Guide has been microfilmed after these introductory pages. Two items found in the course of preparing the records for microfilming are described on a sheet of paper headed “Supplement to Guide” that has been inserted in Harrison’s guide as page 18 ½. Blank numbered and unnumbered pages have not been microfilmed.

            The loose papers consist of ordinances and resolutions of the Louisiana State Convention of 1861; acts and resolutions of Louisiana legislature, 1860-65; letters received by Governors Thomas O. Moore (1860-64) and Henry W. Allen (1864-65); records of the Attorney General, 1861-65; orders of the Auditor’s Office, Jan.- Apr. 1861; election returns of Louisiana, 1861-65. and miscellaneous documents of the State Government, 1860-65. The eighty bound volumes contain printed proceedings of the Louisiana State Convention of 1861; records of the Louisiana legislature, 1860-64; of the Executive (1860-65), Judicial (1861-62), and Treasury (1854-65) Departments, the offices of the Secretary of State (1856-65), the Auditor (1860-62), and the Adjutant General (1850-65 including records of State Troops).

            Except as noted below, the originals of the records reproduced in this microfilm publication have been turned over to the State of Louisiana under authorization from Congress to return State archival materials that came into Federal custody along with archives of the Confederate Government. Three documents listed in Appendix No. 2 of Harrison’s guide (items 30-32), although they relate to Louisiana, were manifestly never part of the Archives of that State. They have therefore been retained by the National Archives after having been microfilmed in place. Photocopies of these items have been substituted for them among the records returned to Louisiana.

 

 

Lovell, Mansfield Letter, Mss. 2687, 1862 [New Orleans, Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 12A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Mansfield Lovell was a Confederate general who commanded at New Orleans from October 1861 until he withdrew his forces from the city to save it from Adm. Farragut’s naval bombardment on 23 April 1862.

            This collection consists of one item, a letter, 9 March 1862, of Mansfield Lovell.  The letter is written to Confederate Maj. Gen. Earl Van Dorn commanding Trans-Mississippi Department.  The letter describes the condition of Confederate forces under his command, the want of supplies, and his efforts to support Confederate forces in Tennessee.  Typed transcription of the letter is included.

0442                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0445                Letters, 1862. 4 frames.

 

Lyman, Joseph W. Letter, 1831, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana.  Location:  Reel 6, Antebellum Southern Plantations.

            Joseph W. Lyman, was apparently a sugar planter in Franklin, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana.  The collection consists of a letter dated March 16, 1831, from Joseph W. Lyman to his grandfather, Moses Long, in Hopkinton, New Hampshire, in which Lyman discussed planting conditions around Franklin, gave a physical description of the area, and explained the growing and processing of sugar cane.

0294                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0298                Folder 1, 1831. 9 frames.

 

TOP

 

M

Markham, Thomas Railey Papers, Mss. 250, 649, 650, 1794-1932 [Mississippi; also Georgia, Tennessee, and Virginia].  Location:  Reel 12A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Thomas Railey Markham (1828-1894) was a chaplain in the Confederate States Army and pastor of the Lafayette Presbyterian Church in New Orleans, 1856-1894.  The Hodgson family were members of the Markham’s congregation.

            This collection consists of papers, 1794-1932, of Thomas Railey Markham.  The Civil War material, consisting of correspondence, military orders, certificates of authorization, and other miscellaneous papers, is primarily concerned with Markham’s activities as a chaplain attached to Gen. W. S. Featherston’s Brigade.  The letters, written by the Markham family and related families, describe military operations and camp and hospital conditions in Tennessee, Mississippi, Georgia, and Virginia.  Also included are lists compiled by Markham giving the names of soldiers in Mississippi regiments and their respective church denominations.  Also included are papers of the Hodgson family including a list of books in the Thomas R. Markham Memorial Library, Lafayette Presbyterian Church; letters and pamphlets of the Louisiana Sunshine Society; and letters to Daisy M. L. Hodgson, recording secretary general of the Confederate Southern Memorial Association.

            A list of omissions from Thomas Railey Markham Papers, Mss. 250, 649, 650, 1794-1932, is provided on Reel 12, Frame 0845.  Omissions consist of volumes, sermons, and printed matter concerning Markham’s education and pastorate.

0449                Introductory Materials. 24 frames.

0473                Folder 1, Papers, 1847-1859. 14 frames.

0487                Folder 2, Papers, 1860-1863. 62 frames.

0549                Folder 3, Papers, 1864-1869. 120 frames.

0669                Folder 4, Papers, 1870-1888. 47 frames.

0716                Folder 5, Papers, 1890-1898. 58 frames.

0774                Folder 6, Papers, 1901-1932. 15 frames.

0789                Folder 7, Papers, Undated. 56 frames.

0845                List of Omissions from Thomas Railey Markham

Papers, Mss. 250, 649, 650, 1794-1932. 1 frame.

 

Marshall, George B. Papers, Mss. 969, 1807-1900 [Rapides Parish, Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 12A & 13, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            George Benoist Marshall was a sugar and cotton planter of Crescent Plantation, Cheneyville, Rapides Parish, Louisiana.  He married Margaret Dawson Cureton, daughter of William H. Cureton, an early settler of Rapides Parish.  During the Civil War, George B. Marshall served as captain of Company C, 1st Battalion, Louisiana State Cavalry.

            This collection consists of family papers, 1807-1900, of George B. Marshall.  Items include Confederate muster rolls, 1863, from Company C, 1st Battalion, Louisiana State Cavalry.  Other papers consist of tax receipts, bills of sale of African American slaves, bills for plantation supplies, statements for medical services to family and slaves, bills for blacksmithing and other skilled work, and post-Civil War labor contracts.  Papers from 1830 to 1860 are chiefly those of William H. Cureton and his wife, Mary B. Cureton.  Other materials include financial papers of John Dawson.

            A list of omissions from George B. Marshall Family Papers, Mss. 969, 1807-1900, is provided on Reel 13, Frame 0282.  Omissions consist of daybooks from the reconstruction period.

0846                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0851                Folder 1, Papers, 1807-1818. 23 frames.

0874                Folder 2, Papers, 1822-1829. 19 frames.

0893                Folder 3, Papers, 1832-1839. 32 frames.

0925                Folder 4, Papers, 1841-1849. 34 frames.

Reel 13

0001                Folder 5, Papers, 1850-1853. 41 frames.

0042                Folder 6, Papers, 1854. 32 frames.

0074                Folder 7, Papers, January-February 1855. 16

frames.

0090                Folder 8, Papers, March 1855. 39 frames.

0129                Folder 9, Papers, April-September 1855. 11

frames. [No 1856 in original.]

0140                Folder 10, Papers, 1857-1859. 29 frames.

0169                Folder 11, Papers, 1860. 12 frames.

0181                Folder 12, Papers, 1862-1869. 25 frames.

0206                Folder 13, Papers, 1870-1879. 16 frames.

0222                Folder 14, Papers, 1880-1891, 1895, and 1900.

31 frames.

0253                Folder 15, Papers, Undated. 14 frames.

0267                Folder 16, Newspapers, 1841, 1891, 1892. 15

frames.

0282                List of Omissions from George B. Marshall Family

Papers, Mss. 969, 1807-1900. 1 frame.

 

Martin Jr., Robert Campbell Papers, 1767-1932 Assumption Parish, Louisiana; Location: Reel 7-11; Records of Southern Plantation, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Robert Campbell Martin Jr. owned Albemarle plantation in Assumption Parish. He was the son of Mary Winfred (Pugh) Martin. This collection begins with a small series of materials that include correspondence, newspaper clippings, and a political broadside. The broadside pertains to the election of 1876 and civil rights for African Americans. It also mentions discrimination faced by African Americans in southern courts and the brutal conditions of convict labor. Other topics covered in this section include sugar and molasses sales, Martin’s marriage to Maggie Chisholm Littlejohn, and the imprisonment of Confederate States of America President Jefferson Davis at Fort Monroe, Virginia. The other document types in this collection are cashbooks, diaries, ledgers, memorandum books, a poll book for Assumption Parish, and a time book.

            The cashbooks begin at Frame 0796 of Reel 7 and cover Martin’s personal finances. There are also some entries noting wages paid to laborers and entries for sugar and molasses sales. Diaries from 1907 to 1909 include commentary on the weather, health conditions, and descriptions of plantation operations. A series of ledger books begins at Frame 0001 of Reel 9 and continues to Frame 0293 of Reel 11. The ledger books span from 1868 to 1915. They document accounts with laborers and commission merchants, banking records, and sugar and molasses sales. Similar types of financial entries can also be found in the notebooks (Volumes 55 and 56) and record books (Volumes 61-63) on Reel 11. The collection concludes with a time book that records work by plantation laborers.

            Related collections in this edition are the Pugh-Williams-Mayes Family Papers, Josephine Nicholls Pugh Civil War Account, William W. Pugh and Family Plantation Records, and Mrs. Mary W. Pugh Papers. Additional Pugh family collections microfilmed by UPA can be found in Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War, Series G: Selections from the Barker Texas History Center, University of Texas at Austin, Part 1, and Series l: Selections from Louisiana State University, Part 1: Louisiana Sugar Plantations.

0512                Introductory Materials

0515                Papers, 1767-1819. 17 frames.

0532                Papers, 1858. 10 frames.

0542                Newspaper Clippings [and papers], 1865-1877.

98 frames.

0640                Broadside, Negro, 1876. 3 frames.

0643                Papers, Undated. 42 frames.

0685                Papers, Removed Newspapers, 1880-1913. 104

frames.

0789                Printed Materials, Undated. 7 frames.

0796                Volume 1, Cashbook, 1881-1883. 63 frames.

0859                Volume 2, Cashbook, 1884-1886. 195 frames.

Reel 8

0001                Volume 3, Cashbook, 1887-1888. 99 frames.

0100                Volume 4, Cashbook, 1891-1900. 192 frames.

0292                Volume 5, Cashbook, 1906-1912. 132 frames.

0424                Volume 6, Cashbook, 1913-1918. 148 frames.

0572                Volume 7, Cashbook, 1928-1932. 124 frames.

0696                Volume 13, Diary, 1907. 100 frames.

0796                Volume 14, Diary 1908. 97 frames.

0893                Volume 15, Diary 1909. 81 frames.

Reel 9

0001                Volume 16, Ledger, 1868-1871. 79 frames.

0080                Volume 17, Ledger, 1872-1876. 38 frames.

0118                Volume 18, Ledger, 1874-1891. 60 frames.

0178                Volume 19, Ledger, 1883. 102 frames.

0280                Volume 20, Ledger, 1884-1885. 93 frames.

0373                Volume 21, Ledger, 1885-1888. 80 frames.

0453                Volume 22, Ledger, 1886-1887. 115 frames.

0568                Volume 23, Ledger, 1888-1889. 93 frames.

0661                Volume 24, Ledger, 1890-1891. 116 frames.

0777                Volume 25, Ledger, 1892-1895. 170 frames.

Reel 10

0001                Volume 26, Ledger, 1896-1897. 135 frames.

0136                Volume 27, Ledger, 1898-1900. 174 frames.

0310                Volume 28, Ledger, 1901-1902. 88 frames.

0398                Volume 29, Ledger, 1902-1903. 91 frames.

0489                Volume 30, Ledger, 1903-1905. 144 frames.

0633                Volume 31, Ledger, 1905-1906. 142 frames.

0775                Volume 32, Ledger, 1906-1909. 158 frames.

0933                Volume 33, Ledger, 1909-1910. 124 frames.

Reel 11

0001                Volume 34, Ledger, 1911-1912. 121 frames.

0122                Volume 35, Ledger, 1912-1915. 172 frames.

0294                Volume 38, Memorandum Book, 1869-1870. 17

frames.

0311                Volume 42, Memorandum Book, 1895. 49 frames.

0360                Volume 43, Memorandum Book, 1896. 84 frames.

0444                Volume 55, Notebook, 1867 and 1881. 71 frames.

0515                Volume 56, Notebook, 1871-1874. 54 frames.

0569                Volume 60, Poll Book, Assumption Parish, 1904.

0583                Volume 61, Record Book, 1858-1864. 37 frames.

0620                Volume 62, Record Book, 1868-1870. 12 frames.

0632                Volume 63, Record Book, 1895-1896. 104 frames.

0736                Volume 64, Time Book, 1873-1875 and 1880. 46

frames.

 

Mathew B. Brady Collection of Civil War photographs 4 rolls 16 mm National Archives RG 111. T252 Location: YSC Microfilm Cabinet 3, Drawer 5

            The file prints reproduced in this microcopy were made from the photographs in the Mathew B. Brady collection. The wet plate collodion negative obtained for the purpose of illustrating the Official Records of the War of the Rebellion but only a few of them were used for this purpose. They were numbered by the War Department and filed in numerical sequence. Subject Catalogue No. 5, published by the Secretary of War in 1897, indexes the file, and has been filmed as Microcopy No. T-251.

            Any of the photographs here listed may be copied and prints supplied from the individual copy negatives. The glass negatives are not now used for filling orders. In ordering copies from this microfilm, both call number and title of each item must be given. If there is more than one image on the Brady negative, the print supplied on order will represent the best image.

            Errors in identification may be discovered. The user of the file will be expected to check the accuracy of all caption material obtained from the print file.

            The National Archives will be glad to furnish prices on request for 8” x 10” glossy prints or matte prints in larger sizes.

            Remittance should be made to the National Archives and Records Service by check or postal money order payable to the General Service Administration.

 

 

Maury, Dabney Herndon Letter, Mss. 2990, 1865 [New Orleans, Louisiana; also Alabama].  Location:  Reel 13, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Dabney Herndon Maury (1822-1900) was a major general in the Confederate States Army and commanded the District of the Gulf.

            This collection consists of one item, a letter, 1 June 1865, from Dabney Herndon Maury, New Orleans, Louisiana, to Gen P. G. T. Beauregard.  The letter describes the Federal siege of Mobile, Alabama, in 1865, along with the Confederate defenses and reasons for the Confederate defeat.

0855                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0859                Letter, 1865. 9 frames.

 

 

 

 

Maxey, Samuel Bell Papers, 1862-1864 [Lamar County and Paris, Texas; also Arkansas, Mississippi, Tennessee, District of Columbia, and Mexico] Location: Reel 21; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection consists of an order book, telegrams, letterbooks, and newspaper clippings relating to Maxey (1825-1895), who was a Confederate general, Texas State senator, and U.S. senator. He took part in the East Tennessee and Red River Campaigns and in the sieges of Port Hudson, Louisiana, and Vicksburg, Mississippi. He later was commander in the Indian Territory. Correspondents include Generals P. G. T. Beauregard, Leonidas Polk, Edmund Kirby Smith, John C. Breckinridge, and John Sappington Marmaduke.

0294                Introductory Materials. 8 frames.

0302                Order Book, 1862. 123 frames.

0425                Telegrams, 1862-1863. 63 frames.

 

 

McAllister, Charles L. Letter, Mss. 2133, 1861 [Chattanooga, Knoxville, and Memphis, Tennessee].  Location:  Reel 13A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of one item, a letter, 21 August 1861, of Confederate soldier Charles L. McAllister to his mother, Mrs. C. LaCroze.  The letter describes his train trip from Memphis to Knoxville, Tennessee, via Chattanooga.  McAllister mentions civilian enthusiasm along the way and gives an eyewitness account of the wreck of a train carrying troops.

0868                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0871                Letter, 21 August 1861. 4 frames.

 

McCollam, Andrew Papers, 1792-1873, Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana.  Location:  Reel 3, Antebellum Southern Plantations.

            Andrew McCollam was a sugar planter, deputy surveyor, and member of the Louisiana Secession Convention of 1861.  McCollam married Ellen Elleonori and lived first in Donaldsonville and later on the family plantation, Ellendale, located outside Houma in Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana.  McCollam also operated Bayou Black, Red River Landing, Terrebonne, and Assumption plantations, whose locations are unclear, except that Bayou Black was located in Terrebonne Parish.  The McCollams had six sons and a daughter.  Sons Edmund and Alexander became prosperous Terrebonne Parish sugar growers, running the Ellendale and Argyle plantations, respectively.  Edmund was also part owner of the South Louisiana Canal and Navigation Company.  Edmund Slattery (fl. 1815-1858), Edmund McCollam’s great uncle, was an import merchant in New York City and Johnstown, New York, and later became a sugar planter in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana.

            This collection consists primarily of papers related to the business operations of the plantations belonging to Andrew McCollam and his sons, Edmund and Alexander.  The collection gives only limited insight into Andrew McCollam’s surveying activities and into Edmund McCollam’s role in the South Louisiana Canal and Navigation Company.

            The papers document the life of Ellen McCollam and her children less fully, though the correspondence does offer insight into family connections and relationships.  Most of the information available on Andrew, Jr., Henry Alexander, and Ellen (Nellie) is related to their school experiences.  Topics of note in the correspondence are an 1839 survey of lands granted to General Lafayette; secession; Civil War battles and troop movements; slave resistance during the war; antebellum and Reconstruction politics; sugar planting, refining and marketing; land transactions; foreign travel; and school and college life in Louisiana and Virginia.

            Financial and legal papers include sugar, merchandise, slave, and sharecropper accounts; plantation journals; deeds; and land plats.  Scattered items, including canal toll records, appear for the South Louisiana Canal and Navigation.  Miscellaneous other papers include farm equipment advertisements, political and commercial broadsides, clippings, pamphlets and magazines, school materials, and a diary (1866-1867) kept by Andrew McCollam on a trip to Brazil.

 

Biographical Note

            Andrew McCollam (fl. 1836-1872) was a deputy surveyor and sugar planter, based primarily in Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana.  First settling in Donaldsonville, Ascension Parish, he lived and worked there until 1851 when he purchased a large sugar plantation near Houma.  This plantation, which he named Ellendale after his wife, Ellen Elleonori, became home to the McCollams.  The McCollams also owned several other plantations, referred to in the papers as Bayou Black, Red River Landing, Assumption, and Terrebonne.  The exact locations of these plantations are unknown, except that Bayou Black was in Terrebonne Parish.  The other plantations were most likely situated in Terrebonne or nearby parishes.

            In 1861 McCollam served as a delegate to the Louisiana Secession Convention.  A Whig, he felt strong ambivalence about secession but supported the Confederacy wholeheartedly once war broke out.  After the war he entertained the idea of relocating to Brazil, but rejected it after a trip to that country.  Deciding to stay in Louisiana, he successfully made the transition from antebellum planter to postwar sugar grower, and left a thriving business for his children.

            The McCollams had six sons and one daughter:  Andrew (b. 1842), Edmund Slattery (b. 1845), John (b. 1846), Henry Alexander (b. 1849), Alexander (b. 1853), Willie (b. 1855), and Ellen.  Edmund and Alexander both become prosperous Terrebonne Parish sugar planters, running Ellendale and Argyle Plantations, respectively. Edmund was also part owner of the South Louisiana Canal and Navigation Company.  Little is know of the lives of the other McCollam children beyond their education.  Andrew, Jr., studied at Centenary College in Jackson, Louisiana, from 1858 until the outbreak of the Civil War.  He served during the war in St. Mary’s Cannoniers.  After the fighting ended he returned to his studies and graduated from Louisiana University in 1868.  Henry Alexander attended Louisiana State Seminary in Alexandria and later the University of Virginia, where he graduated in 1872.  Ellen (referred to as Nellie) studied at the Young Ladies’ Academy of the Ursulines, located just outside New Orleans, in the late 1860s.

            Information on the Slattery family, for whom a number of items appear in the collection, is sparse, and their relation to the McCollams is only partly discernible from the papers.  John Slattery (fl. 1795-1807) immigrated to Johnstown, New York, from Ireland near the turn of the century and set up shop as an import merchant.  Jeremiah (fl. 1808-1815), possibly John’s brother, and Edmund (fl. 1816-1860), who may have been his son, also worked as merchants in New York City and Johnstown.  Edmund later became a sugar planter in Lafourche Parish.  He was the great uncle of his namesake, Edmund Slattery McCollam, but it is unclear whether he was the uncle of Andrew or of Ellen Elleonori McCollam

            A list of omissions from the Andrew McCollam Papers is provided on Reel 5, frame 1057, and includes Subseries 1.2-1.3, Correspondence, 1859-1935; Subseries 2.2, Financial and Legal Papers, 1878-1935; Series 3, Other Papers, 1836-1889; and Series 4, Pictures, 1867-1884.

0189                Introductory Materials. 21 frames.

Series 1

Subseries 1.1

0210                Description of Subseries 1.1 2 frames.

0212                Folder 1, 1814, 1836-1837, 1839, 1842. 51

frames.

0263                Folder 2, 1843. 53 frames.

0316                Folder 3, 1844-1846, 1849-1850. 57 frames.

0373                Folder 4, Letter book (John and Edmund

Slattery), 1792-1807, 1851. 56 frames.

0429                Folder 5, 1851. 65 frames

0494                Folder 6, January-April 1852. 45 frames.

0539                Folder 7, May-June 1852. 42 frames.

0581                Folder 8, July-September 1852. 42 frames.

0623                Folder 9, October-December 1852. 34 frames.

0657                Folder 10, January-August 1853. 33 frames.

0690                Folder 11, September 1853-1858. 55 frames.

Subseries 1.4

0745                Description of Subseries 1.4 1. frame.

0746                Folder 37, Undated. 70 frames.

Series 2

Subseries 2.1

0816                Description of Subseries 2.1 2 frames.

0818                Folder 38, 1795. 13 frames.

0831                Folder 39, Receipt Book (John Slattery, Jeremiah

Slattery, Edmund Slattery), 1804-1826. 48 frames.

0879                Folder 40, 1830, 1838-1839, 1841-1846. 58

frames.

Reel 4

0001                Folder 41, 1847-1853. 67 frames.

0068                Folder 42, 1854. 42 frames.

0110                Folder 43a, Diary and Plantation Record (Ellen

McCollam), 1840-1855. 175 frames.

0285                Folder 43b, Enclosure, Diary and Plantation

Record, 1840-1855. 2 frames.

0287                Folder 44, Typed Transcription (Part I) of Diary

and Plantation Record of Ellen McCollam, 1840-1855. (Also included is a typed transcription of the diary Andrew McCollam kept on his 1866-1867 trip to Brazil. For original, see Folder 101, omitted from this edition.) 201 frames.

0488                Folder 45, Typed Transcript (Part II) of Diary and

Plantation Record of Ellen McCollam, 1840-1855. 178 frames.

0666                Folder 46, 1855-1857, 1859. 44 frames.

0710                Folder 47, Account Book with Clippings

(Unidentified), 1818-1860. 433 frames.

Reel 5

0001                Folder 48, Account Book, with Miscellaneous

Items, 1860-1863. 111 frames.

0112                Folder 49, Account Book (Labor and Supplies),

1838-1865. 73 frames.

0185                Folder 50, 1858-1865. 34 frames.

0219                Folder 51, Plantation Journal, 1849-1866. 168

frames.

0387                Folder 52, 1866-1867. 36 frames.

0423                Folder 53, 1868-1870. 28 frames.

0451                Folder 54, 1871. 15 frames.

0466                Folder 55, Plantation Journal, 1858-1871. 28

frames.

0594                Folder 56, Account Book, 1871-1872. 150 frames.

0744                Folder 57, 1872-1873. 13 frames.

0757                Folder 58, Account Book, 1838-1873. 5 frames.

0951                Folder 59, Enclosures, Account Books, 1838

1873. 5 frames

Subseries 2.3

0956                Description of Subseries 2.3 1 frame.

0957                Folder 97, Undated. 100 frames.

1057                List of Omissions from the Andrew McCollam

Papers. 1 frame.

 

 

McCuiston, Mitchell Henderson Diary, 1863-1866 [Lamar County, Texas] Location: Reel 21; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection contains McCuiston’s diary of his experiences in the Civil War.

0236                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0239                Diary. 45 frames.

 

McElhenny, Robert W. Letter and Genealogical Notes, Mss. 4651, 1863 [Monroe and New Orleans, Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 13A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Robert W. McElhenny (1845-1864) was a soldier in the 24th Regiment (called the Crescent Regiment), a Confederate regiment formed in 1862 in New Orleans.  In November 1863, the unit combined with the 11th and 12th Louisiana Infantry Battalions to form the Consolidated Crescent Regiment.  Robert W. McElhenny was the son of Robert and Nancy Bell (Best) McElhenny, who moved from Alabama to near Holly, De Soto Parish, Louisiana after 1844.

            This collection consists of three items, a letter and genealogical notes, 1863 and undated, of Robert W. McElhenny.  The letter was written from a camp near Monroe, Louisiana, 29 December 1863, by McElhenny to his family.  The letter, to his sister Amanda (McElhenny) Fraser, describes camp along the Ouachita River after marching three hundred miles and his expectations of crossing the Mississippi River.  Genealogical notes list birth and death dates of members of the McElhenny family and contain biographical information about the related Fraser family of Kentucky.

0875                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0878                Papers, 1863 and Undated. 7 frames.

 

 

McKelvey, Peter B. Papers, Mss. 1068, 1862-1870 [New Orleans, Louisiana; also Alabama and Mississippi].  Location:  Reel 13 and 14, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Peter B. McKelvey was a physician of New Orleans, Louisiana, who served as a Confederate States Army surgeon; chief surgeon of the Department of Western Louisiana; and a hospital inspector of the War Department’s Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, in Selma, Alabama.  After the war, McKelvey was resident physician of the “Quarantine Station” and subsequently returned to his medical practice in New Orleans.

            This collection consists of eighty-six items and four volumes, papers, 1862-1870, of Peter B. McKelvey.  Civil War papers consist of a record book, 1864-1865, containing copies of official correspondence and inspection reports for hospitals under the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana; military orders; a request to practice medicine in New Orleans; and related papers.  Postwar papers are chiefly receipts for an advertisement, cards, membership in the Boston Club of New Orleans and the National Union Club, rent, taxes, various medical journals, and merchandise.  A ledger, 1865-1860; cashbook, undated; and visiting book, 1867, relate to McKelvey’s medical practice.

0885                Introductory Materials. 9 frames.

0894                Folder 1, Papers, 1862-1866. 45 frames.

Reel 14

0001                Folder 2, Papers, 1867-1870. 30 frames.

0031                Volume 1, Cashbook, Undated. 24 frames.

0055                Volume 2, Ledger, 1865-1869. 93 frames.

0148                Volume 3, Record Book, 1864-1865. 37 frames.

0185                Volume 4, Visiting Book, 1867. 7 frames.

           

McNeill, George Letters, Mss. 2391, 1861-1862 [New Orleans, Louisiana; also Tennessee and Virginia].  Location:  Reel 21A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

             This collection consists of two items, letters, 1861-1862, of George McNeill.  One letter, 1861, describes social conditions in New Orleans, Louisiana.  The other, 1862, relates efforts to secure consent from the Confederate secretary of war for the assignment of McNeill and others to Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard’s command.

0514                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0519                Letters, 1861-1862. 5 frames.

 

Means, Edward J. Letter Book, Mss. 287, 1864-1888 [Marion District, South Carolina; also North Carolina and Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 14A, Confederate Military Manuscript, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of ten items and one manuscript volume, a letter book, 1864-1888, of Lt. Edward J. Means, commandant of the Confederate Naval Station at Marion Court House, South Carolina.  The volume contains official correspondence by Means. Subjects discussed in the letters include the recapture and confinement of escaped Federal prisoners; requisitions of food, clothing, and medical supplies, including shoes and clothing for African Americans working in the navy yard; methods of obtaining construction materials for the gunboat Pee Dee; the construction of a torpedo boat; and the discharge and transfer of troops, 1864.  Correspondence include Stephen R. Mallory, secretary of the Confederate navy; E.C. Murray, naval constructor at the Pee Dee Navy Yard; John L. Porter, chief naval constructor at Wilmington, North Carolina; Maj. C.D. Melton, commandant of conscripts, Columbia, South Carolina; and Capt. S.S. Lee, chief of office orders and details.  The letter book includes names, ages, and classifications of men employed at the Pee Dee Navy Yard, 1864.  Loose items include an invitation to the wedding of Beverly Means, 1864; a broadside announcing a Universal Union Meeting in Concordia Parish, Louisiana, 1888; an item recording costs of tickets on the Natchez, Red River, and Texas Railroad; and newspaper clippings.

0192                Introductory Materials. 11 frames.

0203                Letterbook, 1864-1888. 94 frames.

0297                Loose Items, 1878-1888 and Undated. 11 frames.

 

Miller, Robert H. Letters, Mss. 2181, 1861 [Concordia Parish, Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 21A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of seven items, letters, 1861, of Robert H. Miller.  Letters pertain to his military service in the Polish Brigade, later known as the 14th Louisiana Infantry Regiment.  They relate the origin of the brigade and nationality of the men enrolled; location of encampment; health, needs, and social life of the regiment; and discipline under Col. Valery Sulakowski, regimental commander.

0524                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0527                Letters, 1861. 24 frames.

 

Minor, William J. and Family Papers, 1779-1941 Ascension and Terrebonne Parishes, Louisiana; also Natchez, Mississippi; Location: Reels 1—4; Records of Southern Plantation, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            William J. Minor owned several sizable plantations in both Louisiana and Mississippi. This collection of William J. Minor papers focuses on Minor’s sugar plantation holdings in Louisiana: Southdown and Hollywood plantations in Terrebonne Parish and Waterloo plantation in Ascension Parish. The collection consists of two main series: correspondence and bound volumes. The correspondence series dates from 1779 to 1865. Among the topics covered in the correspondence are the War of 1812, sugar production, cotton market conditions, the Civil War, and the seizure of Minor’s lands by the U.S. government. Several items in this series also pertain to slaves. For example, some entries within Minor’s financial papers list expenses incurred for medical services for slaves (Reel 1, Frame 0320) An undated letter from a Dr. Cartwright discusses the need for constant attention to the health condition of slaves.

            The bound volumes include personal diaries, ledgers, notebooks, and plantations diaries. The ledger books date from 1834 to 1883 and contain records of sugar and molasses sales, hiring of slaves, and wages paid to overseers. Two volumes of slave lists record the names and ages of slaves, and provisions supplied to them.

            The Minor papers conclude with thirteen volumes of plantation diaries, dating from 1842 to 1870. These plantation diaries are very detailed and provide careful descriptions of the operation of Minor’s plantations in Ascension and Terrebonne Parishes. Minor wrote daily about the sugar production process, sometimes even noting the different tasks performed by men and women. His plantation diaries also contain frequent reports about health conditions. Volume 33 and Volume 34 are particularly interesting because they include Minor’s rules and regulations for managing his Southdown, Hollywood, and Waterloo plantations. These very specific rules cover hours of work; treatment of slaves, including punishment; slave marriage and divorce; rules for holidays; and rules for overseers and slave drivers. Diaries from the Civil War period indicate some of the problems faced by plantation owners during the war and the assertiveness of slaves. Minor occasionally wrote that slaves had left the plantation, and he counseled his overseers that it was essential to try to keep the slaves satisfied. He also warned that corporal punishment should be avoided, if possible. Minor, however, records that even his best efforts were sometimes not enough to prevent his slaves from leaving. Volume 35, Minor’s diary for 1863, includes a list of the slaves that left his plantations. Diary entries from the years after the Civil War provide insight into the functioning of the plantation regime during the crucial transition period between slavery and a free labor system. Some entries, for example, mention that African Americans were refusing to sign labor contracts because they were “holding out for higher wages or better terms of some kind” (Reel 4, Frame 0156). Other entries from this period mention the laborers that did sign labor contracts.

            The William J. Minor Papers begin at Frame 0001 of Reel 1 and continue through Frame 0196 of Reel 4.

0001                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0004                [Correspondence], 1779 and 1793-1801. 29

frames.

0033                [Correspondence], 1802-1806. 31 frames.

0064                [Correspondence], 1809-1811. 29 frames.

0093                [Correspondence], 1812-1813. 35 frames.

0128                [Correspondence], 1814-1815. 23 frames.

0151                [Correspondence], 1816-1817. 35 frames.

0186                [Correspondence], 1818. 27 frames.

0213                [Correspondence], 1819-1824. 24 frames.

0237                [Correspondence], 1827-1828. 37 frames.

0274                [Correspondence], 1829-1830. 21 frames.

0295                Correspondence, 1831-1838 and Undated. 17

frames.

0312                Correspondence and Financial Documents, 1839.

71 frames.

0383                Correspondence and Financial Documents, 1840

1841 and Undated. 35 frames.

0418                Correspondence, 1842. 49 frames.

0467                Correspondence and Printed Documents, 1844

1850. 31 frames.

0498                Correspondence and Printed Documents, 1851

1855. 41 frames.

0539                Correspondence and Printed Documents, 1856

1860. 53 frames.

0592                Correspondence, Printed Documents, and

Financial Statements, 1861-1865. 46 frames.

0638                Correspondence, Printed Documents, and

Financial Statements, 1866-1898. 51 frames.

0689                Correspondence and Financial Statements,

Undated. 8 frames.

0697                Correspondence and Slave Lists, Undated. 27

frames.

0724                Photograph [of Brazos and Bosky Rivers, Texas],

1941. 3 frames.

0727                Volume 1, Diary, 1820-1845. 5 frames.

0732                Volume 2, Diary, 1847-1848. 54 frames.

0786                Volume 3, Diary, 1849. 53 frames.

0839                Volume 4, Diary, 1850. 55 frames.

0894                Volume 5, Diary, 1851. 54 frames.

0948                Volume 6, Diary, 1856. 45 frames.

Reel 2

0001                Volume 7, Diary, 1856-1857. 64 frames.

0065                Volume 8, Diary, 1859. 63 frames.

0128                Volume 9, Diary, 1863. 72 frames.

0200                Volume 10, Diary, 1864. 70 frames.

0270                Volume 11, Ledger, 1834-1883. 201 frames.

0471                Volume 12, Ledger, 1857-1869. 71 frames.

0542                Volume 16, Estate of Catherine L. Wilkinson in

Account with W. J. Minor, Executor, 1849-1859. 39 frames.

0581                Volume 17, List of African Americans [Slaves],

1848-1852. 46 frames.

0627                Volume 18, List of [Slave] Births and Deaths,

1846-1865. 33 frames.

0660                Volume 19, Steam: Its Generation and Use, with

Catalogue of the Manufactures of the Babcock and Wilcox Company, 1893. 94 frames.

0754                Volume 20, Notebook, 1854. 64 frames.

0818                Volume 21, Notebook, 1859. 23 frames.

0841                Volume 22, Notebook, 1860. 14 frames.

0855                Volume 23, Notebook, Undated. 28 frames.

0883                Volume 24, Notebook, 1868-1871. 20 frames.

Reel 3

0001                Volume 25, Plantation Diary, 1842-1856. 110

frames.

0111                Volume 26, Plantation Diary, 1850. 77 frames.

0188                Volume 27, Plantation Diary, 1851-1855. 94

frames.

0282                Volume 28, Plantation Diary, 1856. 55 frames.

0337                Volume 29, Plantation Diary, 1855-1858. 107

frames.

0444                Volume 30, Plantation Diary, 1858-1859. 68

frames.

0512                Volume 31, Plantation Diary, 1858-1861. 148

frames.

0660                Volume 32, Plantation Diary, 1861-1862. 57

frames.

0717                Volume 33, Plantation Diary, 1861-1865. 78

frames.

0795                Volume 34, Plantation Diary, 1861-1868. 120

frames.

0915                Volume 35, Plantation Diary, 1863. 63 frames.

Reel 4

0001                Volume 36, Plantation Diary, 1863-1868. 151

frames.

0152                Volume 37, Plantation Diary, 1869-1870. 45

frames.

 

 

Morgan, John A. Papers, Mss. 1712, 1753, 1840-1945 [Clinton, East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana; also Tennessee].  Location:  Reel 22, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of eighty-one items, papers, 1840-1945 (bulk 1861-1866), of John A. Morgan.  Civil War letters of Morgan, written during his military service with the 4th Regiment of Louisiana Infantry, were sent from various camps, mostly to his sister in East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana.  Letters, 1861, tell of his training at Camp Moore, Louisiana, and reflect the interest and assistance of local people to the Confederate States Army soldiers.  Later correspondence tells of his participation in the Battle of Shiloh, Tennessee, and the Battle of Baton Rouge, Louisiana.  Some letters discuss Adm. Farragut’s effort to capture Vicksburg, Mississippi, and reflect conditions prior to the fall of Port Hudson, Louisiana.  Additional items include a civil War photograph of John A. Morgan; an invitation and calling card, 1865; state of Louisiana currency, 1866; and letters, 1888, and papers concerning the Morgan family genealogy.

0207                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0212                Folder 1, Papers, 1856-1859. 9 frames.

0221                Folder 2, Papers, May-December 1861. 30 frames.

0251                Folder 3, Papers, February-August 1862. 29

frames.

0280                Folder 4, Papers, January-May 1863 and 1864. 26

frames.

0306                Folder 5, Invitation and Calling Card, 1865, and

State of Louisiana Currency, 1866. 3 frames.

0309                Folder 6, Papers, 1865-1880. 4 frames.

0313                Folder 7, Papers, 1888, 1895, 1899, and 1945. 12

frames.

0325                Folder 8, Genealogy, 1840, 1885, and Undated.

18 frames.

0343                Folder 9, Photograph, ca. 1861-1865. 1 frame.

0344                Folder 10, Photograph of a Relative’s House,

Undated. 2 frames.

0346                Oversize Folder, Certificate, 1840. 3 frames.

 

Morgan, Thomas Gibbes, Jr. Letters, Mss. 2035, 1863 [Providence, Rhode Island; also District of Columbia and Ohio].  Location:  Reel 21A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Thomas Gibbes Morgan, Jr. (1837-1864) was a Confederate States Army captain, 7th Louisiana Infantry Regiment.  He enlisted in June 1861 at Camp Moore, Louisiana.  He was captured in November 1863 and died at Johnson’s Island Prison, Sandusky Bay, Ohio.

            This collection consists of two items, letters, 1863, of Thomas Gibbes Morgan Jr.  The letters were written to his cousin, Morris Barker Morgan, of Providence, Rhode Island, from Old Capitol Prison, Washington, D.C., and Johnson’s Island Prison, Ohio.  Letters relate Morgan’s need for money and clothing, his desire to see his wife and children, his pessimism about the release of prisoners of war, and his appreciation for the assistance of his Northern relatives.

0551                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0556                Letters, 1863. 3 frames.

 

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Newell, Robert A. Papers, Mss. 653, 1841-1887 [Rapides Parish, Louisiana; also Texas].  Location:  Reel 14A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Robert Aiken Newell (b. 1819), an Irish immigrant to Louisiana, operated Oak Grove Plantation near Cheneyville.  He married Sarah Ann Forman in 1856, had several children, and was associated with the Keary family of Catalpa Plantation, also near Cheneyville.  In 1863, the Newell family moved to Texas to avoid the Federal occupation of Louisiana.  Newell worked for the Nitre and Mining Co., a private enterprise that processed saltpeter and made gunpowder from bat guano found in bat caves in central Texas.  This company was later managed by the Confederate government as the Nitre and Mining Bureau.

            This collection consists of 250 items, papers, 1841-1887 (bulk 1863-1864), of Robert A. Newell.  Personal correspondence of the 1850s and 1860s reflects the plantation and social activities of the Newell, Forman, and Keary families.  Civil War correspondence includes letters of members of the Newell and Forman families who served in the 16th Louisiana Infantry and the 8th Louisiana Heavy Artillery Battalion at camps Moore, Boggs, Tupelo, and Chalmette.  These letters include comments on the quality of conscript soldiers from Louisiana; the provisioning of troops; the Red River campaign; the siege of Vicksburg; Confederate deserters; and the Confederate defeat.  Letters of Robert A. Newell to his wife were written while he was living with the Keary family of Catalpa Plantation during the Civil War prior to his departure to Texas.  Letters from Newell while he was working and traveling in east and central Texas comment on prices, niter farming, business conditions, Confederate currency, slaves, crops, the local population, and the Comanche Indians of central Texas.  Early financial papers include bills of sale for African American slaves purchased in Louisiana, 1846-1863.  Land records, deeds, tax receipts, and promissory notes document the Newell family’s activities at Oak Grove Plantation.  Papers of the late 1860s through the 1880s consist of tax receipts and other financial and legal documents.  The collection includes the amnesty oath of Robert A. Newell, 1864, genealogical notes, and eleven daguerreotypes of members of the Newell and Forman families.

0308                Introductory Materials. 16 frames.

0324                Folder 1, Papers, 1839 and 1841-1860. 53

frames.

0377                Folder 2, Papers, 1861-1863. 61 frames.

0438                Folder 3, Papers, 1864-1865. 113 frames.

0551                Folder 4, Papers, 1866-1887. 21 frames.

0572                Folder 5, Undated Letters, Sarah A. Newell to

Robert Newell. 17 frames.

0589                Folder 6, Letters, Undated. 12 frames.

0601                Folder 7, Papers, Undated. 10 frames.

0611                Daguerreotypes and Photographs, Undated. 13

frames.

 

 

Nicholson, William Letters, Mss. 583, 1861 [New Iberia and New Orleans, Louisiana; also Tennessee and Texas].  Location:  Reel 14A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of four items, letters, 1861, of William Nicholson to his sister, Mary Ann Nicholson, in Bastrop, Texas.  The letters are written from New Iberia and New Orleans, Louisiana; Nashville, Tennessee; and Bowling Green, Kentucky.  They describe conditions of travel and living conditions in Confederate military camps.

0624                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0629                Letters, 1861. 10 frames.

 

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Oden, William M. Papers, 1856-1864 and 1874 [Centerville, Leon County, Smith County, and Tyler, Texas; also Arkansas, Louisiana, and Tennessee]; Location: Reel 21; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection of correspondence relating to Civil War camp life.

0488                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0493                [Untitled Folder-Correspondence, 1856-1864]. 64

frames.

 

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Peak, Frank P. Narrative, Mss. 629, 1863 [Chicot, Arkansas; also Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee and Pennsylvania].  Location:  Reel 15, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of one item, a bound typed transcription of the personal narrative, 1863, of Frank P. Peak, entitled “A Southern Soldier’s View of the Civil War, 1860-1862.”  In the volume, written while Peak was imprisoned at Allegheny, Pennsylvania, in 1863, he gives a brief history of the secession movement of 1860 and describes the organization of a cavalry “home guard” company and the formation of a state militia infantry company.  Peak also describes his enlistment in the Byrnes Battery at Camp Boone; camp life in Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, and Mississippi; and his service in the Confederate States Army of the West, including the Battle of Shiloh, Tennessee, 1862.

0001                Introductory Materials. 8 frames.

0009                Personal Narrative, 1863. 26 frames.

 

Perkins, John Papers, 1822-1864, Tensas Parish, Louisiana.  Location:  Reel 18, Antebellum Southern Plantations.

            John Perkins (1819-1885), cotton planter and lawyer of Somerset Plantation, Ashwood, Louisiana, was appointed judge of the Circuit Court for Madison Parish in 1851, served as Democratic representative from Louisiana to the U.S. Congress in 1853-1855, represented Madison Parish in the permanent Confederate Congress at Richmond in 1862-1865 and migrated to Mexico in 1865 where he worked as a colonization agent.  In 1866, Perkins moved to Paris and thereafter traveled extensively in Europe and in Canada before returning to the Unites States in 1878.

            This collection contains correspondence, financial and legal papers, and other papers which document primarily the political and financial interests of John Perkins.  Some papers reveal Perkins’s financial and personal relationship with his father, but little other material related to his personal life or family may be found here.

            Correspondence about politics is found especially in 1853-1855, the years of Perkins’s service in the U.S. Congress, and somewhat in later years.  Correspondence about the Confederate army and other Confederate government business is found in 1861-April 1865.  Most of the correspondence of the years immediately following the Civil War is about Perkins’s emigration to Mexico and work as a colonization agent there.  Other correspondence is about management of Perkins’s plantations in Louisiana in the 1850s and 1870s and in Texas in the 1860s.

            Other papers include drafts of speeches, a petition to make Confederate notes legal tender, and clippings.

 

Biographical Note.

            John Perkins (1819-1885), a Louisiana planter and lawyer, was born in Natchez, Mississippi, July 1, 1819.  His parents were Mary Bynum Perkins and John Perkins, Sr. (fl. 1819-1867).

            Perkins was educated by private tutors and graduated from Yale College in 1840 and Harvard Law School in 1842.  Admitted to the bar in 1843, he practiced law in New Orleans for four years.  He relinquished his law practice to become a cotton planter.  He resided at Somerset Plantation, Ashwood, Louisiana.  He apparently owned a cottage at White Sulphur Springs in Virginia.

            Active in local politics, Perkins was appointed judge of the Circuit Court for Madison Parish in 1851.  Perkins served as Democratic representative from Louisiana to the U.S. Congress in 1853-1855.  As chairman of the state secession convention in 1861, Perkins wrote Louisiana’s secession ordinance.  In the provisional Confederate Congress, Perkins served on the Printing and Foreign Affairs Committees and assisted in drafting the Constitution.  He also represented Madison Parish in the permanent Confederate Congress at Richmond in 1862-1865.  He generally supported the administration, and served on the Foreign Affairs, Rules, Ways and Means, and Commerce Committees.

            In 1865, Perkins migrated to Mexico, where he was made colonization agent.  In 1866 he moved to Paris and thereafter traveled extensively in Europe and in Canada.  He returned to the United States in 1878.  Perkins died in Baltimore, Maryland, November 28, 1885.

            A list of omissions from the John Perkins Papers is provided on reel 18, fram 0975, and includes Subseries 1.4-1.5, Papers, 1865-1885; Subseries 2.2, Petitions, 1865; and Subseries 2.3 Clippings, 1850s-1880s.

0001                Introductory Materials. 14 frames.

0015                Description of Subseries 1.1. 1 frame.

0016                Folder 1, 1822-1848. 43 frames.

0049                Description of Subseries 1.2. 1 frame.

0050                Folder 2, 1850-1854. 26 frames.

0076                Folder 3, January-June 1855. 54 frames.

0130                Folder 4, July-December 1855. 81 frames.

0211                Folder 5, 1856. 50 frames.

0261                Folder 6, January-July 1857. 44 frames.

0315                Folder 7, August-December 1857. 62 frames.

0377                Folder 8, 1858. 43 frames.

0420                Folder 9, 1859. 72 frames.

0492                Folder 10, 1860. 35 frames.

0527                Description of Subseries 1.3. 1 frame.

0528                Folder 11, 1861. 72 frames.

0600                Folder 12, 1862. 126 frames.

0726                Folder 13, January-November 1863. 50 frames.

0776                Folder 14, December 1863. 24 frames.

0800                Folder 15a, 1864-April 1865. 63 frames.

0863                Folder 15b, Undated, ca. 1861-1865. 21 frames.

0884                Description of Subseries 1.6. 1 frame.

0885                Folder 22, Undated. 22 frames.

0907                Description of Subseries 2.1. 1 frame.

0908                Folder 23, Writings and writing Fragmentws, ca.

1855. 67 frames.

0975                List of Omissions from the John Perkins Papers. 1

frame.

 

 

Pinson, Hamet and Family Papers, Mss. 1385, 1859-1951 [El Dorado, Arkansas; also Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 14A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Dr. Hamet Pinson, an El Dorado, Arkansas, physician, graduated from the New Orleans School of Medicine.  He was appointed assistant surgeon in the Confederate States Army, with duty in Louisiana and Arkansas.

            This collection consists of 491 items and five volumes, papers of Hamet Pinson, and family, 1859-1951.  Antebellum papers concern his medical education.  Papers of the Civil War era are primarily special orders for Pinson.  A memorandum book records his orders in the Confederate States Army.  Papers, 1866-1869, concern Reconstruction, business, and personal matters.

            A list of omissions from Hamet Pinson and Family Papers, Mss. 1385, 1859-1951, is provided on Reel 14, Frame 0911. Omissions consist of Papers, 1870-1951, and Volumes 2-5.

0658                Introductory Materials. 11 frames.

0669                Folder 1, Papers, 1859-1860. 28 frames.

0697                Folder 2, Papers, 1862-1865. 31 frames.

0728                Folder 3, Papers, 1866-1867. 84 frames.

0812                Folder 3A, Papers, 1868-1869. 43 frames.

0855                Folder 17, Pictures, Undated. 3 frames.

0858                Folder 18, Photographic Copy of Portrait of Dr. Hamet Pinson, Confederate States Army, ca.

 

Polk, Leonidas Letter, Mss. 2689, 1863 [Chickamauga, Georgia].  Location:  Reel 15, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Leonidas Polk (1806-1864), bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church in Louisiana, operated Leighton Plantation near Thibodaux, Louisiana.  He rose to the rank of lieutenant-general in the Confederate States Army during the Civil War.  He led a corps of the Army of Tennessee under Gen. Braxton Bragg and commanded the Army of Mississippi and the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana.  He was killed in action at Pine Mountain, Georgia.

            This collection consists of one item, a letter, 29 September 1863, from Gen. Leonidas Polk to Gen. John C. Breckinridge in reference to Polk’s removal from his command by Gen. Braxton Bragg at Chickamauga, Georgia, with interrogatories concerning the events surrounding the battle, 19-20 September 1863.

0035                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0038                Letter, 29 September 1863. 3 frames.

 

 

Polk, William Papers, 1840-1867, Rapides Parish, Louisiana; also Georgia: Reel 15 Antebellum Southern Plantations.

Description of the Collection

            William Polk (1821-1898), a sugar planter of Ashton Plantation near Alexandria in Rapides Parish, Louisiana, was the son of Thomas G. Polk (1791-1869) and Mary Eloise Trotter Polk. He was married in 1857 to Rebecca Eveline Lamar (fl. 1840-1858) of Macon, Georgia, daughter of Jefferson J. Lamar (d.1840) of Stewart County, Georgia. William and Rebecca Lamar Polk had three children: Alice, William, Jr., and Mary Eloise.

            Business and legal papers of William Polk include a complaint of William Polk (for his wife, Rebecca Eveline Lamar Polk) and Lucius Mirabeau Lamar (fl. 1840-1858) against Thomas R. Lamar (fl. 1840-1858) and Abner C. McGehee (fl. 1840-1858), executors of Jefferson J. Lamar of Stewart County, Georgia, with other papers relating to Lamar’s estate, which include Lamar’s will, a marriage agreement between William Polk and Rebecca Eveline Lamar, an appraisement of Jefferson J. Lamar’s slaves, perishable property, notes, and real estate; and MeGehee’s answer to the complaint. Undated accounts and lists probably connected with the settlement of Lamar’s estate are filed in Folder 2.

            Other business papers of William Polk include slave bills of sale, two letters about slave purchases, and a letter from Kenneth Rayner in Memphis about Tennessee land that had belonged to Thomas G. Polk.

0001                Introductory Materials. 6 frames.

0007                Folder 1, Estate of Jefferson J. Lamar, 1840-1858.

135 frames.

0142                Folder 2, Probably Related to Estate of Jefferson

J. Lamar, Undated. 67 frames.

0209                Folder 3, 1858-1867. 22 frames.

 

Pond, Preston Letter, Mss. 4622, 1862 [Louisiana] Reel 15 Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of one item, a letter, 11 January 1862, from Col. Preston Pond, commander of the 16th Louisiana Volunteers, to Col. S. S. Heard, commander of the 17th Louisiana Volunteers, by order of Brig. Gen. Daniel Ruggles. The letter, dated at Camp Benjamin, sets up a guard system to prevent any private or noncommissioned officer from passing from the camp without a leave of absence.

0041                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0044                Letter, 11 January 1862. 2 frames.

 

Power, Ellen Louise Diary, 1862-1863, East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana; Location: Reel 4; Southern Women and Their Families in the 19th Century, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Description of the Collection

            Ellen Louise Power was born 11 December 1841, and lived in East Feliciana, Louisiana, near Port Hudson. She died 17 June 1918.

            Ellen Louise Power (1841-1917) was a young woman preparing to marry at the time she began to keep this journal. Her ninety-five-page diary, kept in an account book, contains daily entries recording household activities, social affairs and local news. Power apparently resided in the country near Jackson, Louisiana possibly on a large farm or plantation, as there are some references to servants, and a brief commentary on a “darkey’s wedding.” Entries largely contain references to music lessons, sewing, baking, and visits and social affairs—or, as war approached, the lack thereof. Power mentioned many names of family members, friends, neighbors, and various guests, including Confederate soldiers in the area.

            Many entries contain information relating to the impact of war on East Feliciana. Included are descriptions of civilian relief efforts, war shortages, the departure of slaves from neighboring plantations, and local activity as Union troops approached and attached New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and nearby Port Hudson.

            Power began the diary on New Year’s Day 1862 while in bed with typhoid fever, which she feared she would pass on to her mother. Earliest entries document household and social activities; Power described making gloves, sewing dresses, dyeing threads, baking breads and “Confederate cakes,” quilting, knitting, and sewing, as well as attending concerts, picnics and tableaux, and receiving a steady stream of quests at her home.

            References to military activity increase in entries for the spring of 1862, when Union troops took New Orleans and proceeded to Baton Rouge. Topics include news of battles and casualties, civilian relief efforts, war shortages, and the department of slaves from neighboring plantation. Of particular interest are entries from May through July 1863 as the Union army attacked and captured Port Hudson, bringing the war to East Feliciana. Several entries record the Power family’s efforts to aid Confederate soldiers; in June 1863, Union soldiers ransacked the Powers’ home.

            Both the original diary and a typed transcription are included.

0422                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0427                Folder 1, Ellen Louise Power, Diary, 1862-1863.

97 frames.

0524                Folder 2, Typed Transcription of Diary, 1862

1863. 116 frames.

 

Pritchard, Catherine McAlpin Wray Papers, 1829, 1887-1899, New Orleans, Louisiana; also Great Britain; Location: Reel 4; Southern Women and Their Families in the 19th Century, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Description of the Collection

            This collection consists of Catherine McAlpin (Wray) Pritchard’s diary account of a trip from New Orleans to England and Scotland in the summer and fall of 1829, interspersed with occasional diary entries by her husband, George Washington Pritchard; and correspondence and legal papers relating to the war claim by Catherine McAlpin (Wray) Pritchard and her daughters against the U.S. government, 1888-1899.

            Correspondence, 1892-1899, concern the claim of Catherine McAlpin (Wray) Pritchard and her daughters Catherine Mary (Pritchard) Rogers, Cora Rosina Pritchard, and Georgine (Pritchard) Rainey, against the U.S. government for property damages suffered in New Orleans during the Civil War. Correspondents include U.S. representatives Adolph (“Ad”) Meyer (6 February 1892) and Robert Charles Davey (14 February 1898). Included is a letter from Alexander Porter Morse to Judge Frank McGloin, and a letter to McGloin from attorney John C. Dougherty at Memphis, 19 September 1899. Legal materials relating to this claim include eight sworn affidavits in support of the claims; a brief by Alexander Porter Morse given to the U.S. House of Representatives Commission on War Claims, 19 January 1888; a petition to the Senate and House, ca. 1888; and printed Court of Claims and congressional documents. Damage included destruction of a grove of live oak trees at the property on the corner of Camp and Thalia streets.

            A diary written by Catherine McAlpin (Wray) Pritchard, with entries by her husband, George Washington Pritchard, dated 1 July—24 December 1829, concerns a trip to England and Scotland. Details include descriptions of the sea passage from New Orleans to Liverpool on board the ship Tally Ho; brief descriptions of the Irish coast, Liverpool, Shrewsbury, Oxford, Glasgow, and Edinburgh; fuller descriptions, including references to social life and customs, especially of friends and relatives, at Meole (County of Shropshire) and London; and the return home on board the ship Jane. Entries include notes about the weather and, during the sea voyages, the location of ship by longitudinal and latitudinal coordinates.

            A typed transcription (45 pages) of the Pritchard diary made by the staff of Southern Historical Collection, ca. 1948, also is included.

 

Biographical Note

            Catherine McAlpin (Wray) Pritchard (1811-1888) was born and died in New Orleans, Louisiana. She married George Washington Pritchard (d. 1860), who had relatives in England, sometime before mid-1829. The Pritchards traveled to England and Scotland from July to December 1829. During the Civil War, Catherine McAlpin (Wray) Pritchard remained in New Orleans. After the war, she filed a war claim, petitioning the U.S. government for payment of damages caused by elements of the U.S. army during their occupation of her house from 1863 to 1865. Her daughters, Catherine Mary (Pritchard) Rogers (fl. 1842-1899), Cora Rosina Pritchard (fl. 1899), Georgine (Pritchard) Rainey (fl. 1845-1899), proceeded with the petition after her death.

            Other persons mentioned in connection with the Pritchard war claim include John G. Dougherty (fl. 1888-1899), assistant attorney for the U.S. Department of Justice at New Orleans and Memphis; Frank McGloin, a New Orleans judge (fl. 1898-1899); and Alexander Porter Morse (fl. 1887-1899), an attorney working in Washington, D.C.

            N. B. A related collection among the holdings of the Sourthern Historical Collection is the Rainey and Wren family Papers.

0640                Introductory Materials. 8 frames.

0648                Folder 1, Correspondence, 1892-1899. 19 frames.

0667                Folder 2, Legal Materials, 1887-1899. 77 frames.

0743                Folder 3, Volume 1, Catherine McAlphin Wray

Pritchard, Dairy, 1829. 46 frames.

0789                Folder 4, Volume 2, Typed Transcription of Diary,

1829. 50 frames.

 

Prudhomme Family Papers, Mss. 625, 665, 1836-1868 [Natchitoches, Louisiana; also Mississippi] Reel 15 Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            P. L. Prudhomme, son of Lestan Prudhomme, was a Confederate lieutenant in the Pelican Rangers, 3rd Regiment, Louisiana Infantry.  F. A. Prudhomme, P. L.’s brother, was a captain in the 2nd Regimen, Louisiana Cavalry.

            This collection consists of twenty-seven items and three volumes, family papers, 1836-1868 (bulk 1862-1863), of P. L. Prudhomme. Some items are in French. The collection is predominately Civil War letters, 1862-1863, written by P. L. and F. A. Prudhomme from comps in Mississippi and southern Louisiana to their parents in Natchitoches.  Letters discuss troop movements and health, camp life, battles, war casualties, and more. Items also include a return of Capt. Octave. V. Metoyer’s Company G of the 26th Regiment of Louisiana Infantry, March 1865.  Additional items include a letter, 1847, regarding the price of cotton in New Orleans; a letter, 1866, by Hugh N. Jones to Octave V. Metoyer describing Jones’s journey to Texas after the war; and a letter, 1868, from P. L. Prudhomme regarding bills and money. Typed transcriptions of letters include translations of some of the French language materials.

0046                Introductory Materials. 12 frames.

0058                Folder 1, Typed Transcriptions and Translations

of Manuscripts, 1847-1868 and Undated. 65 frames.

0123                Folder 2, Papers, 1847-1868 and Undated. 76

frames.

0199                Folder 3, Photograph of Suzette Huppe with

Memorandum concerning Letters of Advice to her Son, Undated. 3 frames.

0202                Folder 4, Embroidery Patterns Removed from

Album of Memory, 1859-1864. 5 frames.

0207                Folder 5, Cloth Bag, Undated. 2 frames.

0209                Folder 6, Typed Transcription of Suzette Huppe,

Letters of Advice to my Son, 1836. 14 frames.

0223                Volume 1, Album of Memory, 1859-1864. 58

frames.

 

Prudhomme, Phanor Papers, 1804-1940, Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana:  Reel 15, Antebellum Southern Plantations.

            Phanor Prudhomme (d. 1865) was a cotton planter of Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana. His son, J. Alphonse Prudhomme (b. 1838), attended the University of North Caroline from 1858 to 1860 and succeeded Phanor on the family plantation at Ile Breville (later called Bermuda) in 1867.

            The collection includes business papers and volumes, dated 1804-1876, of Phanor and, later, J. Alphonse Prudhomme, relating to cotton growing at Ile Breville. Papers include bills, receipts, indentures, and a small amount of correspondence with factors in New Orleans. A few papers are dated after the turn of the century, with some as recent as 1940. Among early materials are papers relating to other cotton planters of Natchitoches Parish. Besides loose papers, the collection contains twenty-five volumes, most of which relate directly to plantation life and include slave records, accounts with freedmen, and a variety of other agricultural and personal records dated 1836-1878. There is a small amount of non-business correspondence, most of which relates to family or community affairs. Many items are in French.

 

Biographical Note

            Phanor Prudhomme (d. 1865) was a cotton planter of Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana. He appears to have taken over the family plantation at Ile Breville (sometimes spelled Brevelle) in the 1840s and continued as the principal actor on the plantation until his death. The plantation was located about thirteen miles from the town of Natchitoches and encompassed lands that straddled the Red River.

            Phanor Prudhomme was married to Suzanne Lize Metoyer (d. 1855), whose family also seems to have owned considerable acreage in Natchitoches Parish. The Metoyer family may also have been active in commercial endeavors, such as cotton factorages and stores. The Prudhommes had five children: Adeline (b. 1836); J. Alphonse (b. 1838); Emma (d. before 1855); Henriette, (b. 1842); and Emanuel (b. 1844). Upon Phanor Prudhomme’s death in 1865, J. Alphonse took control of the Ile Breville plantation and other family interests. It is not clear how the other children shared in the inheritance.

            Besides the main plantation, materials in this collection suggest that Phanor Prudhomme had other business ventures, including a sawmill that was widely used by his neighbors. Prudhomme’s stature in the community can be surmised from an 1855 letter in which he declined the offer of a Democratic party nomination to Congress. Near the end of his life, Phanor’s property was listed for war tax purposes. This 1862 assessment shows Phanor in possession of the following: nine hundred acres in cultivation; twelve hundred woodland acres; one hundred acres directly fronting the Red River; one thousand acres of pine woods; and a lot and townhouse at Natchitoches. In addition, he owned a total of 146 slaves, several gold watches, considerable silver and gold plates, a piano, and miscellaneous farm and pleasure conveyances, both animals and vehicular. His children were well educated, with his daughters attending the Ladies of the Sacred Heart School in Natchitoches (mid 1850s), and his sons the University of North Carolina (J. Alphonse, 1858-1860) and Georgetown College, Washington, D.C. (Emanuel, 1861).

            Phanor Prudhomme’s death in 1865 seems not to have been related to the Civil War, and the succession of his son as head of plantation activities appears to have been smoothly achieved. The war, of course, changed the composition of the work force on the family’s plantation, but seems to have had little effect on the actual output of cotton and other crops. Materials in this collection indicate that, at some point, the family’s land came to be known as Bermuda Plantation. As such, it was occupied by Prudhomme descendants at least into the late 1940s.

0231                Introductory Materials. 1 frame.

0242                Description of Series 1. 1 frame.

0243                Folder 1, 1804-1839. 42 frames.

0285                Folder 2, 1840-1842. 45 frames.

0330                Folder 3, 1843-1849. 50 frames.

0380                Folder 4, 1850-1851. 80 frames.

0460                Folder 5, 1852. 72 frames.

0532                Folder 6, 1853. 106 frames.

0638                Folder 7, January-May 1854. 69 frames.

0707                Folder 8, June-December 1854. 89 frames.

0796                Folder 9, 1855. 56 frames.

0852                Folder 10, 1856. 74 frames.

 

 

Prudhomme, Phanor Papers cont. Series 1. Correspondence, Financial and Legal Materials, and Other Items, 1804-1940 and Undated cont. Reel 16 Antebellum Southern Plantations.

Series 1. Correspondence, Financial and Legal Materials, and Other Items (1804-1940 and undated)

            Most items contained in this series are related to business matters, especially cotton growing and sales.

            From 1804 to 1854, this subseries consists chiefly of business papers, including bills, receipts, ledger sheets, legal documents, plats, and shipping documents. There is a small amount of business correspondence, largely with a variety of cotton factors in New Orleans. Very early material is slight and deals not only with the Prudhommes, but with other Natchitoches cotton planters. By the 1840s, most of the material is related to the Prudhommes, with Phanor the chief recipient and sender. There are many slave lists and some items having to do with the buying and selling of slaves. In the 1850s, there are bills and receipts for all kinds of commodities, from seed and sheet music to farm machinery and revolvers.

            From 1855 to 1861, material is similar to that described above. Also included is a May 20, 1855 letter in which Phanor Prudhomme declined the Democratic party nomination to Congress; and a February 24, 1857, bill by which Francois Gacion Metoyer, “a free man of color,” sold a slave to Phanor Prudhomme.

            From 1862 to 1865, there is little evidence of the impact of the Civil War on the Prudhommes’ lives, save for war tax assessment dated July 16, 1862; and notes, beginning January 2, 1862, recording Phanor Prudhomme’s sending slaves to help build fortifications to defend the town of Natchitoches; and letters, around January 1865, relating to Phanor Prudhomme’s request for safe passage to move his slaves.

            From 1866 to 1876, there is a shift in responsibility for the plantation to J. Alphonse Prudhomme after Phanor Prudhomme’s death. At the end of 1869, there is a final settlement of the estate of Phanor Prudhomme’s wife, Suzanne Lize Metoyer Prudhomme, who died in 1855. This document gives much information on the Prudhomme family.

            From 1877-1940, items related mostly to the Prudhomme family and to farming. There are very few items dated after the turn of the century.

Reel 16

0001                Folder 11, 1857-1858. 142 frames.

0143                Folder 12, 1859. 90 frames.

0233                Folder 13, 1860. 41 frames.

0274                Folder 14, 1861. 98 frames.

0372                Folder 15, 1862-1863. 48 frames.

0420                Folder 16, 1864-1865. 58 frames.

0478                Folder 17, Undated before 1865. 62 frames.

0540                Folder 18, 1866-1867. 97 frames.

0637                Folder 19, 1868. 151 frames.

0788                Folder 20, 1869-1876. 93 frames.

0881                Folder 21, 1877-1940. 63 frames.

0944                Folder 22, Undated after 1865. 21 frames.

 

 

Prudhomme, Phanor Papers cont. Series 2 Volumes, 1836-1878 Reel 17 Antebellum Southern Plantations.

Series 2. Volumes (1836-1878)

            Except where stated, all volumes relate to Phanor Prudhomme and the family plantation at Ile Breville, later called Bermuda.

            Suberies 2.1 Plantation Records and Other Volumes (1836-1878) This subseries consists of a slave work record, 1836, including individual daily picking records; a plantation journal, 1837, including slave lists and scattered accounts; a plantation journal, 1839-1842, containing scattered journal entries, accounts, slave lists, and notes; Phanor Prudhomme’s accounts with various individuals, 1836-1852; a stud book, 1847-1857; an account book containing entries relating to Prudhomme and Lecomte family properties, 1845-1860, including Magnolia, Shallow Lake, and Vienna plantations; sawmill accounts, 1860-1862; and a plantation journal, 1856-1863, containing farm work records, accounts, slave lists, and other records.

            Also included are plantation records, dated 1860-1864, kept in printed books called “The Cotton Plantation Record and Account Book” by Thomas Affleck (Printed in New Orleans, these books offered the opportunity to make entries under titles such as “Daily Record of Passing Events,” “Daily Record of Cotton Picked,” and “Planter’s Annual Record of His Negroes.”)’ Phanor Prudhomme’s accounts with various individuals, 1858-1865, including sawmill accounts and records of Confederate States of America bonds purchased; plantation records, 1867, with J. Alphonse Prudhomme in charge of the plantation (The format is similar to those used in 1860-1864, but the forms were modified to reflect the demise of slavery.); and miscellaneous accounts, 1866-1878, including accounts with freedmen, records relating to the estate of Phanor Prudhomme, and other records.

            Subseries 2.2. Pocket Notebooks of Phanor Prudhomme (1841-1864) This subseries consists of ten pocket notebooks belonging to Phanor Prudhomme containing scattered journal entries, accounts, various lists, and miscellaneous notes.  Note that there are no journals for some years and that other years are covered in more than one notebook.

Reel 17

0001                Description of Subseries 2.1 1 frame.

0002                Folder 23, Slave Work Record, 1836. 22 frames.

0024                Folder 24, Plantation Journal, 1837. 23 frames.

0047                Folder 25, Plantation Journal. 1839-1842. 13

frames.

0060                Folder 26, Accounts with Various Individuals,

1836-1852. 46 frames.

0106                Folder 27, Stud Book, 1847-1857. 21 frames.

0127                Folder 28, Account Book, 1845-1860. 29 frames.

0156                Folder 29, Sawmill Accounts, 1860-1862. 19

frames.

0175                Folder 30, Plantation Journal, 1856-1863. 68

frames.

0243                Folder 31, Plantation Records, 1860. 72 frames.

0315                Folder 32, Plantation Records, 1861. 77 frames.

0392                Folder 33, Plantation Records, 1862. 72 frames.

0464                Folder 34, Plantation Records, 1863-1864. 85

frames.

0549                Folder 35, Accounts with Various Individuals,

1858-1865. 26 frames.

0575                Folder 36, Plantation Records, 1867. 60 frames.

0635                Folder 37, Miscellaneous Accounts, 1866-1878.

116 frames.

0751                Description of Subseries 2.2 1 frame.

0752                Folder 38, 1843. 28 frames.

0780                Folder 39, 1841-1845. 22 frames.

0802                Folder 40, 1852. 26 frames.

0828                Folder 41, 1854. 23 frames.

0851                Folder 42, 1855. 42 frames.

0893                Folder 43, 1855. 24 frames.

0917                Folder 44, 1856. 36 frames.

0953                Folder 45, 1860-1861. 23 frames.

0976                Folder 46, 1861-1862. 24 frames.

1000                Folder 47, 1862-1864. 25 frames.

 

 

Pugh, Josephine Nicholls Civil War Account, Updated, ca. 1862-1868 Assumption Parish, Louisiana; Location: Reel 7; Records of Southern Plantations, Louisiana State University Baton Rouge

            This small collection consists of two folders of Josephine Nicholls Pugh’s descriptions of life in Assumption Parish during the Civil War. The first folder contains an account entitled “Dark Days: A Woman’s Record.” In this account, Pugh describes Civil War battles, the activities of slaves during the war, and the occupation of Assumption Parish by the Union Army. This folder also includes a letter from William W. Pugh to their daughter, Louisa Hunter Pugh, describing Josephine Nicholls Pugh (William’s wife and Louisa’s mother). The second folder in this is an account entitled “Battle of Himelaya,” a Civil War battle won by the Union Army that took place on the plantation owned by her husband, William W. Pugh.

            Related collections in this edition are the Pugh-Williams-Mayes Family Papers, Robert Campbell Martin Jr. Papers, William W. Pugh and Family Plantation Records, and Mrs. Mary W. Pugh Papers. Additional Pugh family collections microfilmed by UPA can be found in Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War, Series G: Selections from the Barker Texas History Center, University of Texas at Austin, Part 1, and Series l: Selections from Louisiana State University, Part 1: Louisiana Sugar Plantations.

0485                Introductory Materials. 2 frames.

0487                Civil War Account, “Dark Days: A Woman’s Record,” ca. 1865, Undated. 16 frames.

0503                Civil War Account, ca. 1865. 9 frames.

 

Pugh-Williams-Mayes Family Papers, 1844-1933 Assumption Parish, Louisiana; Location: Reel 7; Records of Southern Plantation, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of papers from the related Pugh, Williams, and Mayes families. Richard Pugh, the son of Thomas Pugh, married Mary Louise Williams in 1861. There is one folder of materials covering the business affairs of John Williams and R. B. Mayes. The Mississippi cotton plantation records of John Williams have been microfilmed as part of UPA’s Records of Southern Plantations from Emancipation to the Great Migration, Series B: Selections from the Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections, Louisiana State University Libraries, Part 4: Mississippi Cotton Plantations. The portion of the Pugh-Williams-Mayes Family Papers microfilmed by UPA for this edition focuses on the Pugh family and consists of correspondence, legal materials, and financial records. Topics covered in the correspondence include Civil War battles and the Pugh family’s escape to Texas in advance of the Union Army invasion of Assumption Parish in the winter of 1862.

            By the 1860s, the Pugh family owned over 1,500 slaves. In the legal papers, a volume of “slave sales receipts” contains detailed records of the slaves purchased by Richard Pugh. Most of the slaves were purchased by Pugh in New Orleans. The receipts typically list the age, price, complexion, and possibly other features or skills possessed by the slaves. For example, some receipts note that the slave was a carpenter or blacksmith. A slave named Louise purchased by Richard Pugh was described as a “superior French cook.” The collection concludes with two volumes of financial records. These volumes include records of wage payments made to laborers on Richard Pugh’s lands in the 1870s and early 1880s. Some of the entries note payments to Chinese laborers.

            Related collections in this edition are the Josephine Nicholls Pugh Civil War Account, Robert Campbell Martin Jr. Papers, William W. Pugh and Family Plantation Records, and Mrs. Mary W. Pugh Papers. Additional Pugh family collections microfilmed by UPA can be found in Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War, Series G: Selections from the Barker Texas History Center, University of Texas at Austin, Part 1, and Series 1: Selections from Louisiana State University, Part 1: Louisiana Sugar Plantations.

0001                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0004                Correspondence-General, 1850-1889. 35 frames.

0039                Correspondence-Richard Pugh to Mary Pugh,

1859-1863 and 1865. 85 frames.

0124                Correspondence-Mary Pugh to Richard Pugh,

1860 and 1862-1863. 41 frames.

0165                Legal-General, 1844-1889 and Undated. 36

frames.

0201                Legal-Slave Sales Receipts, 1859-1861. 51

frames.

0252                Financial-Receipts for Goods, Services, &

Accounts, 1860-1864. 28 frames.

0280                Financial-Receipts and Requisitions for Salt and

Corn. 16 frames.

0296                Financial-Receipts for Goods, Services, and

Accounts, 1865-1881. 46 frames.

0342                Financial-Receipts for Goods, Services, and

Accounts, 1882-1896 and Undated. 48 frames.

0390                Financial-Steamboat Freight Receipts, 1881

1933. 12 frames.

0402                Volume 4, Journal, 1870-1872 [Richard Pugh,

Assumption Parish, Louisiana]. 40 frames.

0442                Volume 7, Ledger, 1871-1882 [Richard Pugh,

Leighton Plantation, Assumption Parish, Louisiana]. 43 frames.

 

 

Pugh, Mrs. Mary W. Papers, 1882-1925, Assumption and Lafourche Parishes, Louisiana; Location: Reel 13 and 14; Records of Southern Plantation, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Mrs. Mary Williams Pugh was the wife, and later widow, of Richard Pugh, the owner of Madewood plantation in Assumption Parish, Louisiana. In 1889, after her husband’s death, Mary Pugh also purchased Live Oak plantation in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana. The majority of this collection consists of correspondence. Major topics covered in the correspondence include health conditions, travel, and social affairs. A significant amount of correspondence is between Mary Pugh and her daughter, nicknamed Pinksie. Pinksie moved to Los Angeles in the 1890s and much of her correspondence with her mother describes life in that city.

            The collection also covers several different aspects of the sugar industry in Assumption and Lafourche Parishes. For example, there is a November 1887 letter discussing a strike for higher wages by African American sugar laborers. The letter notes that all African Americans, except for those on three plantations, had struck, and that the planters had agreed not to meet the strikers’ wage demands. Letters from November 25, 1887, and January 29, 1888, also discuss the strike. The January letter relates that the leader of the strike had been tarred and feathered.

            Correspondence from the 1910s and 1920s shows that the Pughs began to diversify their business interests. For example, the family ran the Thibodaux Brick Works, Edward Pugh began to invest in the petroleum industry in Texas, and the family rented out portions of Live Oak plantation to the Ernest Roger Company, Ltd. The Ernest Roger Company then took responsibility for the sugar crop on Live Oak, indicating the movement toward corporate control of sugar plantations in the twentieth century. Additional materials on the Pugh family’s business interests can be found in the other series in this collection: Legal Documents, Financial Documents, and Memorandum Books.

            The Legal Documents series includes items on Pugh v. Frierson, a case that involved the settlement of the estate of Mary Pugh’s father, John Williams. Other legal documents show the purchase of stock in the Columbia Cotton Mill Company and investment in the petroleum industry. Financial documents include banking records, accounts with commission merchants, and records of sugar and molasses sales. The Memorandum Books series includes personal finances, accounts with sugar laborers, and accounts with workers at the Thibodaux Brick Works.

            Related collections in this edition are the Pugh-Williams-Mayes Family Papers, Josephine Nicholls Pugh Civil War Account, Robert Campbell Martin Jr. Papers, and William W. Pugh and Family Plantation Records. Additional Pugh family collections microfilmed by UPA can be found in Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War, Series G: Selections from the Barker Texas History Center, University of Texas at Austin, Part 1, and Series l: Selections from Louisiana State University, Part 1: Louisiana Sugar Plantations.

0001                Introductory Materials. 2 frames.

0003                Correspondence, 1882-1883. 26 frames.

0029                Correspondence, 1885-1887. 70 frames.

0099                Correspondence, January-June 1888. 97 frames.

0196                Correspondence, July-December 1888. 37 frames.

0233                Correspondence, 1889. 54 frames.

0287                Correspondence, 1890-1893. 43 frames.

0330                Correspondence, 1894-1895. 33 frames.

0363                Correspondence, 1896. 1898. 37 frames.

0400                Correspondence, January-June 1899. 86 frames.

0486                Correspondence, July-September 1899. 60 frames.

0546                Correspondence, October-December 1899. 45 frames.

0591                Correspondence, 1900. 51 frames.

0642                Correspondence, 1901. 60 frames.

0702                Correspondence, 1902-1904. 68 frames.

0770                Correspondence, 1905. 45 frames.

0815                Correspondence, 1906-1909. 27 frames.

0842                Correspondence, 1910-1917. 39 frames.

0881                Correspondence, 1918-1919. 39 frames.

0920                Correspondence, 1920-1923. 45 frames.

0965                Correspondence, January-August 1924. 41 frames.

Reel 14

0001                Correspondence, September-December 1924 and 1925. 57 frames.

0058                Correspondence, Undated. 109 frames.

0167                Items Removed from Correspondence, Undated. 12 frames.

0179                Correspondence, Pugh v. Frierson, 1908-1916 and Undated. 54 frames.

0233                Legal Documents, Pugh v. Frierson, 1915. 34 frames.

0267                Legal Documents, Pugh v. Frierson,  [1915]. 40 frames.

0307                Legal Documents, Pugh v. Frierson, 1907 and 1922. 16 frames.

0323                Legal Documents, 1903-1925 and Undated. 31 frames.

0354                Financial Documents, 1894-1899. 36 frames.

0390                Financial Documents, 1900-1902. 42 frames.

0432                Financial Documents, 1903-1914. 41 frames.

0473                Financial Documents-Insurance, 1920. 25 frames.

0498                Financial Documents, 1915-1923. 43 frames.

0541                Financial Documents, 1924-1925. 35 frames.

0576                Financial Documents, Undated. 24 frames.

0600                Financial Documents-Banking Records, 1915-1925. 43 frames.

0643                Photographs, Undated. 2 frames.

0645                Photographs, A. H. Pugh, Undated. 3 frames.

0648                Photographs, 1924-1925 and Undated. 3 frames.

0652                Photographs, Undated. 5 frames.

0657                Volume 1, Memorandum Book, 1864. 30 frames.

0687                Volume 2, Memorandum Book, 1899. 21 frames.

0708                Volume 3, Memorandum Book, 1906-1920. 25 frames.

0733                Volume 4, Memorandum Book, 1918. 8 frames.

0741                Volume 5, Memorandum Book, 1919-1924. 20 frames.

0761                Volume 6, Memorandum Book, 1922-1924. 24 frames.

0785                Volume 7, Memorandum Book, Undated. 29 frames.

0814                Volume 8, Memorandum Book, Undated. 8 frames.

0822                Volume 9, Items Removed from Memorandum Book, 1908-1920. 4 frames.

0826                Volume 10, Notebook, 1887. 24 frames.

0850                Volume 11, Notebook, 1889. 15 frames.

0865                Volume 12, Notebook, Undated. 13 frames.

 

Pugh, William W. and Family Plantation Records, 1852-1912 Assumption Parish, Louisiana; Location: Reel 12; Records of Southern Plantation, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection of William W. Pugh and Family Plantation Records consists primarily of financial records, including cashbooks, journals, ledgers, record books, and a time book pertaining to Pugh’s plantation holdings in Assumption Parish. Most of these volumes contain accounts with laborers. The accounts typically list the first and last names of the laborers, the number of days worked, and the amount earned. Some the volumes also note cash advances and labor payments for “watches.” “Watches” were night shifts observing the operation of the sugar mill. Pugh paid laborers twice as much for labor in the sugar can fields as he did for watches. Volume 3 includes accounts with commission merchants with notations on the percentage paid to the commission merchant. In the early twentieth century, Pugh also established a company to run Woodlawn plantation. Pugh served as chairman of the Woodlawn Planting and Manufacturing Company from 1903 to 1906. The minutes from meetings of the company’s board of directors for 1903—1906 can be found in Volume 10 (Reel 12, Frame 0771).

            Related collections in this edition are the Pugh-Williams-Mayes Family Papers, Josephine Nicholls Pugh Civil War Account, Robert Campbell Martin Jr. Papers, and Mrs. Mary W. Pugh Papers. Additional Pugh family collections microfilmed by UPA can be found in Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War, Series G: Selections from the Barker Texas History Center, University of Texas at Austin, Part 1, and Series l: Selections from Louisiana State University, Part 1: Louisiana Sugar Plantations.

0001                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0004                Correspondence, 1888, 1909-1910, and Undated.

6 frames.

0010                Folder 2, Financial, 1905, 1911, and Undated. 9

frames.

0019                Printed Materials, 1884, 1900, and Undated. 18

frames.

0037                Volume 1, Cashbook, 1907-1908. 60 frames.

0097                Volume 2, Cashbook, 1908-1909. 21 frames.

0118                Volume 3, Journal, 1855 and 1876. 29 frames.

0147                Volume 4, Journal, 1865-1866 and 1903. 51

frames.

0198                Volume 5, Ledger, 1855-1897. 16 frames.

0214                Volume 6, Ledger, 1905-1906. 151 frames.

0365                Volume 7, Ledger, 1906-1908. 206 frames.

0571                Volume 8, Ledger, 1909-1910. 130 frames.

0701                Volume 9, Ledger, 1911-1912. 70 frames.

0771                Volume 10, Minute Book, 1903-1906. 30 frames.

0801                Volume 11, Record Book, 1899-1909. 85 frames.

0886                Volume 12, Record Book, 1903-1908. 30 frames.

0916                Volume 13, Record Book, 1903-1908. 26 frames.

0942                Volume 14, Time Book, 1908. 4 frames.

 

TOP

 

R

Raguet, Henry Family Papers, 1786-1923 [Columbia, Harris County, Harrison County, Houston, Marshall, Nacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Quitman, Rush County, and San Augustine, Texas; also Louisiana, New Mexico, Ohio, and Pennsylvania] Location: Reel 21; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection consists of proceedings of the Angelina Navigation Company and muster rolls of the First Texas Cavalry Battalion. Condy Raguet was a captain in the First Texas Cavalry Battalion, Confederate Army.

0557                Introductory Materials. 14 frames.

0571                Omissions List. 1 frame.

0572                Inventory. 1 frame.

0573                Proceedings and Muster Rolls. 45 frames.

 

Randon, Francois (1 Ledger) 1876-1888 New Orleans, Louisiana; Location: Reel 15; Records of Southern Plantation, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Francois Randon was a New Orleans dealer in sugar mill supplies. The ledger book consists of accounts of sales made by Randon to plantations along the Mississippi River from False River to New Orleans and to plantations on Bayou Teche.

0303                Introductory Materials. 2 frames.

0305                Volume 1, Ledger, 1876-1888. 32 frames.

 

 

Raoul, W. G. Letters, Mss. 2949, 1862-1864 [Independence, Louisiana; also Virginia and Pennsylvania] Reel 15 Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            W. Greene Raoul was a resident of Independence, Louisiana. He enlisted as a private in the Confederate States Army at age nineteen. He served with the Washington Artillery, 1862-1864, when he was promoted to captain and assigned to the construction and distribution of railroad cars.

            This collection consists of eighteen items, W. G. Raoul’s letters to his family. The letters comment on camp life and military travel in Virginia; the battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania; and other Confederate military engagements. Very little of the correspondence deals with personal or family matters.

0281                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0286                Letters, 1862-1864 and Undated. 62 frames.

 

Ray, David M. Papers, 1859-1879 [Grayson County, Kentucky Town, and Whitewright, Texas; also Arkansas and Louisiana] Location: Reel 21; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection consists of correspondence by Ray relating to Civil War camp life, hospital conditions, and the Red River Campaign. Ray served in the 16th Texas Dismounted Cavalry and was later an assistant surgeon. The material also includes Ray’s amnesty oath and a biographical sketch.

0618                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0622                [Untitled Folder-Correspondence, 1859-1879]. 92

frames.

 

 

 

 

 

Ray, John B. Letters, 1861-1864 [Grayson County and Whitewright, Texas; also Arkansas and Louisiana] Location: Reel 21; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection consists of correspondence written by Ray during the Civil War and relating to camp life and his service in the Red River Campaign.

0714                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0718                Letters, ca. 1861-1864. 22 frames.

 

Reid, Major John Papers, Confederate States Army Collection (B), Mss. 365, 1861-1867 [Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia] Reel 3 and 21 Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            John Reid was chief commissary of subsistence of the Confederate army of the West. Before the Civil War, Reid was a member of Congress from Missouri. He organized a company of volunteers and took part in a skirmish at Lexington, Missouri, 18 September 1861. After the war, he returned to Missouri and acquired real estate holdings.

            This collection consists of forty-one items, papers, 1861-1867, of Maj. John Reid. Items consist of certified bills for goods and services for the Headquarters, Commissary Department, Missouri State Guard, 1861-1862; special orders to Reid from the Adjutant General’s Office in Richmond, Virginia, 1862; letters from Maj. Theodore Johnston, commissary director in the 1st Division, District of Tennessee, 1862; letters and a report of the Board of Survey concerning beef purchases from I. B. Dunn & Co. of Jefferson, Texas, 1863-1864; and letters from Maj. William H. Thomas, chief of subsistence, Trans-Mississippi Department in Shreveport, Louisiana, regarding government contractors in Jefferson, Texas, 1865-1867. Included are printed regulations, 19 July 1864, concerning the employment and welfare of freedmen within the lines of the National Military Occupation, signed by William P. Mellen.

0120                Introductory Materials. 13 frames.

0133                Papers, 1861-1867. 69 frames.

 

 

Renwick, W. P. and Joseph Papers, Mss. 626, 1863-1884 [Alexandria and Shreveport, Louisiana; also Mississippi] Reel 20 Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of twenty-seven items, letters, 1863-1884, of W. P. and Joseph Renwick. Letters 1863-1865, from W. P. Renwick to his family from camps near Snyders Mill, Mississippi, and Alexandria and Shreveport, Louisiana, describe aspects of camp life in the Confederate States Army. Other letters, 1871-1881, from Bastrop and Monroe, Louisiana, discuss local news and family life. Letters, 1883-1884, from Cadet Joseph Renwick describe his life at Louisiana State University.

0001                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0005                Folder 1, Letters, 1863-1865. 16 frames.

0021                Folder 2, Letters, 1871-1881. 21 frames.

0042                Folder 3, Letters, 1883-1884. 20 frames.

 

Retif, P. E. Letters, Mss. 3365, 1864 [New Orleans, Louisiana; also South Carolina] Reel 15 Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            P. E. Retif was a Confederate soldier and a member of the Orleans Guard Battery. He became a prisoner of war and was paroled from Greensboro, North Carolina, in April 1865.

            This collection consists of two items, letters, 1864, of P. E. Retif. The letters, in French, are written from Charleston, South Carolina, to Retif’s mother in New Orleans, Louisiana. They express concerns about his family and his views on the war. Retif also implies that the letters are being smuggled through Union-controlled areas. Typed translations of the letters are included.

0348                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0352                Letters, 1864. 10 frames.

 

Reynes, Joseph and Family Papers, Mss. 1038, 1743-1929 [New Orleans, Louisiana] Reel 15 Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Joseph Reynes (1793-1873) was a member of a prominent Creole family in New Orleans who held various public positions. Gov. Henry Johnson appointed him as justice of the peace for the 2nd District of New Orleans, and he was later appointed by Gov. A. B. Roman as director of the Louisiana State Bank. He was married to Polyxene Mazureau Reynes. Their sons included Emile and Charles Edouard Reynes.

            This collection consists of family papers, 1743-1929 (bulk 1862-1869), of Joseph Reynes. The papers comprise correspondence, documents, essays, business papers, photographs, and bound manuscript volumes. Correspondence includes family letters describing military life and conditions in the Confederate States Army and civilian life during the Federal occupation of New Orleans. A series of letters, 1862-1865 and undated, from Joseph Reynes and his wife, Polyxene Mazureau Reynes, to their sons reflect civilian life in New Orleans during the Federal occupation of the city. Letters from Emile and Charles Edouard Reynes of the Confederate States Army to their mother describe army life and service in the field. Most of the correspondence is in the French language.

            A list of omissions from Joseph Reynes and Family Papers, Mss. 1038, 1743-1929, is provided on Reel 16, Frame 0504. Omissions consist of Papers, 1743-1858, and volumes 1-36.

N.B. Researchers should note the existence of Elisabeth Joan Doyle, “Civilian Life during the Federal Occupation of New Orleans,” Ph. D. dissertation, Louisiana State University, history, May 1995.

0362                Introductory Materials. 43 frames.

0405                Folder 1, Papers, 1862. 8 frames.

0413                Folder 2, Papers, 1863. 125 frames.

0538                Folder 3, Papers, January-June 1864. 124 frames.

0662                Folder 4, Papers, July-October 1864. 118 frames.

0780                Folder 5, Papers, November-December 1864. 144

frames.

0924                Folder 1, Papers, 1865 and 1867-1868. 63

frames.

 

Richardson, Frank Liddell Papers, 1851-1869, Iberia Parish Louisiana.  Location:  Reel 7, Antebellum Southern Plantations. 

            This collection contains papers of the Richardson family of Iberia Parish, Louisiana, including Frank Liddell Richardson (fl. 1850-1869), Confederate soldier; his wife, Martha Josephine Moore Liddell (1846-1897); and his father, Francis DuBose Richardson (b. 1812), Louisiana state legislator.

            This collection includes letters from Frank Liddell Richardson to his father and to other members of the Liddell family.  Letters to his father, 1851-1852, deal chiefly with Louisiana politics, and letters to other family members, 1861-1865, discuss his Civil War experiences as a soldier in the Second Louisiana Regiment.  Also included are volumes relating to Martha Josephine Moore Liddell, containing school work, poems, essays, and diary entries.

 

Biographical Note.  Frank Liddell Richardson (fl. 1850-1869) was the son of Francis DuBose Richardson (b. 1812) and Bethia Liddell Richardson (d. 1852).  His father was a planter and owned Bayside Plantation on Bayou Teche in Iberia Parish, Louisiana.

            Little is known about Frank Liddell Richardson other than that he served in Company II of the Second Louisiana Regiment in the Confederate army.  Sometime after 1869, he married Martha Josephine Moore (1846-1897).

0001                Introductory Materials. 7 frames.

0008                Description of Series 1. 1 frame.

0009                Folder 1, 1851-1852. 14 frames.

0023                Folder 2, 1861. 40 frames.

0063                Folder 3, 1862-1867. 93 frames.

0156                Folder 4, Undated. 12 frames.

0168                Description of Series 2. 1 frame.

0169                Folder 5, Volume 1, Martha Josephine Moore,

School Essays, 1861. 34 frames.

0203                Folder 6, Volume 2, Martha Josephine Moore,

Diary and Essays and Poems, 1864. 71 frames.

0328                Folder 8, Volume 4, Martha Josephine Moore,

Album of Sentimental Messages, 1867-1869. 31 frames.

Richardson, Henry Brown Family Papers, Mss. 2987, 1834-1967 [Tensas Parish, Louisiana; also Mississippi].  Location:  Reel 16, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Henry Brown Richardson (1837-1909), son of Rev. Henry Richardson, a New England clergyman, was a chief engineer of the State Board of Engineers of Louisiana, 1880-1904, and a member of the Mississippi River Commission, 1904-1909.  Richardson served in the Confederate States Army as a member of the Corps of Engineers under the commands of generals Jubal E. Early, Richard Taylor, and R.S. Ewell.  In 1867, he married Annie “Nannie” Farrar, daughter of Thomas P. Farrar of Myrtle Grove Plantation, near St. Joseph, Tensas Parish, Louisiana.

            This collection consists of 244 items and four volumes, papers, 1834-1967, of Henry Brown Richardson and family.  Early correspondence includes letters from Rev. Henry Richardson and letters of Henry Brown Richardson detailing his travels in Wisconsin and Illinois.  Civil War correspondence includes Henry Brown Richardson’s letters, 1863-1865, to his parents from Johnson’s Island Prison, Sandusky, Ohio.  One of these is a lengthy letter discussing his sympathy for the Confederate cause.  Papers after 1866 relate to his life in St. Joseph, Tensas Parish, Louisiana.  After 1877, papers concern his family life in New Orleans where he worked as an engineer.  Correspondence of Anna Farrar Richardson to and from various members of the Richardson and Farrar families is included.  Also included are two maps of the battlefield at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 1876; and a map of the United States showing the slaveholding regions and Indian reservations, ca. 1860.

            A list of omissions from Henry Brown Richardson Family Papers, Mss. 2987, 1834-1967, is provided on Reel 17, Frame 0302. Omissions consist of Folders 11-12 and 15-19 and Volumes.

0505                Introductory Materials. 18 frames.

0523                Folder 1, Sermons of Reverend Henry Richardson,

Undated (after 1834). 16 frames.

0539                Folder 2, Correspondence, 1853-1859. 71 frames.

0610                Folder 3, Correspondence, 1860-1869. 51 frames.

0661                Folder 4, Correspondence, 1870-1879. 133

frames.

0794                Folder 5, Family Correspondence, 1852-1857. 69

frames.

0863                Folder 6, Family Correspondence, 1858-1859. 77

frames.

Reel 17

0001                Folder 7, Family Correspondence, 1860-1867. 70

frames.

0071                Folder 8, Family Correspondence, 8 March 1865.

19 frames.

0090                Folder 9, Family Correspondence, 1867-1880. 56

frames.

0146                Folder 10, Miscellaneous Civil War Documents,

1861-1865. 16 frames.

0162                Folder 13, Miscellaneous Correspondence, 1860

1912 and Undated. 98 frames.

0260                Folder 14, Miscellaneous Correspondence and

Printed Matter, 1859-1909 and Undated. 20 frames.

0280                Old Map Case, Drawer 3, Maps of the Battle of

Gettysburg, 1-3 July 1863. 13 frames.

0293                Map Case, D-16, S-2, Map of the United States,

ca. 1860. 2 frames.

0295                Map Case, D-16, S-1, Maps of Russia, 1740-1753.

7 frames.

0302                List of Omissions from Henry Brown Richardson

Family Papers, Mss. 2987, 1834-1967. 1 frame.

 

Robert E. Lee, Selected military service records. 1 roll. 16mm. National Archives RG 94 M2063 Location: YSC Microfilm Cabinet 3, Drawer 2.

On the single roll of this microfilm publication, M2063, are reproduced selected military service records relating to Robert E. Lee. These records are part of the Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1780’s-1917. Record Group 94; Records of the Office of the Chief of Engineers, RG 77; War Department Collection of Confederate Records, RG 109; and Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1917, RG 407.

            Robert E. Lee, ranking general of the armies of the Confederacy during the Civil War, was born January 19, 1807 at Stratford, Westmoreland County, VA, and died October 12, 1870, at Lexington, VA. He was appointed to the United States Military Academy at West Point July 1, 1825, from which he graduated second in his class. Upon graduation, he was brevetted a second lieutenant in the Corps of Engineers, July 1, 1829. He thereafter rose steadily through the ranks, especially as a result of “gallant and meritorious conduct” in battle in the Mexican-American War during 1847. He was promoted to first lieutenant, September 21, 1836; captain July 7, 1838; brevet major, for gallant and meritorious conduct in the Battle of Cerro Gordo, Mexico, April 18, 1847 brevet lieutenant colonel for gallant and meritorious conduct in the battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mexico, August 20, 1847 brevet colonel for gallant and meritorious conduct in the battle of Chapultepec, Mexico, September 13, 1847; lieutenant colonel, 2d Cavalry, March 3, 1855; colonel, 1st Cavalry, March 16, 1861. He resigned April 20, 1861.

            His service in the U. S. Army included the following: assistant engineer in the construction of Forts Monroe and Calhoun, for the defense of Hampton Roads, VA, 1829-34; assistant to the chief engineer at Washington, D. C., 1834-37; and assistant astronomer for establishing the boundary between the states of Ohio and Michigan, 1835. He was superintending engineer of improvements to the St. Louis, MO, harbor, and the Missouri and Upper Mississippi Rivers, 1837-41; had general charge of improvements to the Lower Mississippi and the Ohio River below Louisville, KY 1840-41; and also had general charge of the construction of and repairs to the defenses at the Narrows entrance to New York harbor, 1841-44 and 1844-46. He was a member of the board of Visitors to the Military Academy, 1844. assistant to the chief engineer at Washington, D. C., 1844; and member of the Board of Engineers for Atlantic Coast Defenses, September 8, 1845, to March 13, 1848.

            During the Mexican-American War, Lee was chief engineer of the column commanded by Brig. Gen. John E. Wool during the march toward Chihuahua, 1846, During 1847, he was involved in the siege of Vera Cruz. March 9-29; reconnaissance, April 15-17; the Battle of Cerro Gordo, April 17-18; reconnaissance through the Pedregal, August 18-19; Battle of Contreras, August 19-20; reconnaissance of Coyoacan, August 20; the battle of Churubusco. August 20; Battle of Molino del Rey, September 8; reconnaissance of the approaches to Mexico City, September 9-13; storming of Chapultepec, September 13, where he was wounded; and the assault and capture of Mexico City, September 13-14.

            He was on special duty in the Engineer Bureau at Washington, D. C., 1848; served as superintending engineer of the construction of Fort Carroll, Patapsco River, MD, 1848-52; was a member of the Board of Engineers for Atlantic Coast Defenses, July 21, 1848, to April 11, 1853 and served as Superintendent of the United States Military Academy, September 1, 1852, to March 31, 1855. He was in command at Jefferson Barracks, MO, 1855 on frontier duty at Camp Cooper, TX, 1856-57; in the expedition against Comanche Indians, 1856; and at San Antonio, TX 1857. He was on leave of absence from 1857-59. Upon his return to duty, he was in command of the force at Harper’s Ferry that suppressed John Brown’s raid, October 17-25; in command of the Department of Texas, February 6-December 12, 1860; and on leave of absence thereafter until his resignation.

            On April 23, 1861, Lee accepted command of the armed forces of Virginia, and on August 31, 1861, became a full general in the Confederate Army. For nearly four years, Robert E. Lee was the dominant figure in the Confederacy’s military attempt to gain its independence from the United States, but on April 9, 1865, at Appomattox Courthouse, VA. He surrendered to Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant. After the war Lee accepted the presidency of Washington College in Lexington, VA: following his death, the school was renamed Washington and Lee University.

Records Description

            The records reproduced in this microfilm are listed below, along with the number of the record group in which the record is located.

1. Letters Received by the Adjutant General’s Office, File L60-1861. RG 94. These begin with Lee’s application to West Point in 1824 and conclude with his resignation in 1861.

2. Engineer Order No. 8, August 11, 1829. RG 77.

3. Compiled Military Service Record, Robert E. Lee, 1861-65. RG 109

4. Gen Robert E. Lee’s Letter to Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant Regarding the terms of surrender, April 7-9, 1865. RG 94??

5. Parole of Honor signed by Gen. Lee and members of his staff, April 9, 1865. RG 94.

6. 201 File for Robert E. Lee, Old Records Division, Adjutant General’s Office. RG 407.

 

 

Roberts, Abishai W. Papers, Mss. 370, 1837-1916 [Lake Providence, Louisiana; also Mississippi and Ohio].  Location:  Reel 17, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Abishai W. Roberts was an attorney of Lake Providence, Louisiana.  He served in the Confederate States Army during the Civil War and was a prisoner of war at Johnson’s Island, Sandusky Bay, Ohio.  Roberts was married to Lucy Smith, daughter of Aurelia Woodward and stepdaughter of John S. Woodward.

            This collection consists of 363 items, papers, 1837-1916 (bulk 1866-1878), of Abishai W. Roberts.  The collection contains legal papers, receipts, a license to practice law signed by the Louisiana Bar Association, 1857, papers concerning court cases, and personal and business correspondence of Abishai W. Roberts.  Letters from Roberts during the Civil War include one written from Johnson’s Island Prison, 1864.  Many post-Civil War letters were written to and from Lucy Roberts (nee’ Smith) and concern personal matters.  Papers dating before 1860 are principally those of  John S. Woodward and Aurelia Woodward and include receipts, deeds, and mortgages, some showing the Woodward’s ownership of the San Socie Hotel in Pass Christian, Mississippi.

            A list of omissions from Abishai W. Roberts Papers, Mss. 370, 1837-1916, is provided on Reel 17, Frame 0601. Omissions consist of Papers, 1870-1916.

0303                Introductory Materials. 13 frames.

0316                Folder 1, Papers, 1837-1859. 98 frames.

0414                Folder 2, Papers, 1860-1866. 91 frames.

0505                Folder 3, Papers, 1867-1869. 96 frames.

0601                List of Omissions from Abishai W. Roberts Papers,

Mss. 370, 1837-1916. 1 frame.

 

Roberts, Oran Milo Papers, 1815-1953 [Austin, Gilmer, Marble falls, and Tyler, Texas; also Alabama, Arkansas, District of Columbia, Louisiana, and South Carolina] Location: Reel 21; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection consists of Roberts’s correspondence during the Civil War, as well as reminiscences, views on secession, and a history of the war in Texas. Roberts was a district attorney, judge, chief justice of Texas, U.S. congressional candidate, and governor of Texas.

0740                Introductory Materials. 8 frames.

0748                Omissions List. 1 frame.

0749                Inventory. 1 frame.

 

 

 

 

0750                Miscellaneous Correspondence, 1839-1891. 20

frames.

0770                The Governments, Constitutions, and

Jurisprudence of Texas, Lecture 8—1861-1865 During the Southern Confederacy. 34 frames.

 

Robertson, Eliza Anne (Marsh) Papers, 1849-1872, Iberia Parish, Louisiana.  Location:  Reel 12, Antebellum Southern Plantations. 

            Eliza Anne Marsh Robertson was born on Petite Anse Island (now Avery Island), Iberia Parish, Louisiana, to John Craig Marsh and Eliza Anne Baldwin.  In May 1844, she married William Robertson (1819-1890), with whom she had ten children.  She died in October 1878 in New Iberia, Louisiana.

            The collection consists of a single volume used by Eliza Robertson, partly as a scrapbook for newspaper clippings and partly as a diary, with a few other types of entries; a typed transcription of the diary entries; six letters; and a page of recipes.

            The scrapbook pages are covered with clippings from newspapers of poems, short stories, anecdotes, songs, remedies, and other material.  Exceptions are two pages containing poems, one headed “New Iberia June 25th 1843 to my Sister,” and signed “Margaret,” and two pages containing drawings by others.  It appears that some clippings were pasted over journal entries.

            Diary entries, which are detailed, though fairly brief, document the daily routine of this Louisiana gentlewoman.  Although little information regarding her husband or family’s business interests can be found in the journal, entries indicate that the Robertson family retained a number of slaves.

            Robertson described household activities in which she was involved; she was particularly thorough in her account of clothing production, describing the fabrics, patterns and processes involved as she produced and mended dresses, aprons, petticoats, pantaloons, shirts, nightgowns, shoes, and other articles of clothing for her children and servants and for herself.  Of special interest is the effect of the acquisition of a sewing machine on this work.  Other tasks noted and described include the production of food, purchasing of goods, and even the making of toys for her children.

            Robertson often made a distinction in her entries between work she herself performed and work she delegated to others, providing some record of the chores performed by household servants.  She noted a number of affectionate gestures toward her servants, and her regard for them as well as her frustration when illness or other circumstances limited their usefulness to her.

            Robertson was equally detailed in her accounts of social affairs and visits.  She noted the names of guests to the household, lengths of visits, dishes prepared for them, games played, lectures attended, authors and books read, etc.  Of special interest are her descriptions of a family Christmas celebration and a celebration among African Americans at Eastertime.

            When Robertson began her account on November 21, 1849, her husband was away.  William Robertson appears to have traveled often, leaving Eliza home with the servants and children.  Her father, John Marsh, was a frequent visitor, as was her brother Daniel.  She corresponded with her sisters, Sarah and Margaret, who seem to have lived nearby.

            After January 1850, there is a four-year gap in entries.  Robertson returning to her journal on November 5, 1854.  During this interval her son, William, two months old in November 1849, had died, as had her sister Margaret, and she had given birth to two other sons, George and Johnny.  Entries continue to detail household activities and production.

            There is some mention of Robertson’s religious life as well; although an Episcopalian, she worshipped sporadically at the Methodist and Catholic churches until the arrival of an Episcopal Bishop, at which she expressed great joy.

            Entries in 1855 indicate that William Robertson was a member of the “Know-Nothings” and attended meetings of this secret society.  Robertson also wrote of preparations for her new baby, primarily the making of baby clothes.  Shortly after the birth of Avery in July 1855, Robertson ceased to write in her journal, picking up her pen once again in March 1856.  Her final entry is dated May 26, 1856.

            Inserted in the diary were six letters, four dated 1872 from Robertson, one of these to a sister and the other three to a niece, and two undated letters to a sister, probably also from Robertson.  Topics include items needed for her dining room, a Mardi Gras ball, and a fever epidemic, as well as family and local news.  Included with the letters is a page of recipes for gold cake, pickle lilly, blackberry wine, lemon pudding, cocoa nut pudding, apple marmalade, and the curing of beef.

 

Biographical Note.  Eliza Ann Marsh Robertson was born on Petite Anse Island (now Avery Island), Iberia Parish, Louisiana, to  John Craig Marsh, originally of Rahway, New Jersey and Eliza Anne Baldwin.  On May 16, 1844, she married William Robertson (1819-1890), an 1840 graduate of the U.S. Marine Academy.  Eliza and William had ten children:  Margaret (born and died February 2, 1845), Leila (1846-1930), Julius (1847-1889), William Kennedy (1849-1851), George Marsh (1851-1912), John Craig Marsh (1853-1903), Mary Avery (1855-1927), Helen (1857-1930), Sam Tate (1861-1867), and Katherine Baldwin (1864-1943).  Eliza Robertson’s family appears to have been involved in the sugar trade, although her husband’s occupation is not surely known.  She died in New Iberia, Louisiana, in October 1878.

N.B.  The Avery Family Papers among the holdings of the Southern Historical Collection and included in this edition is a collection related to the Eliza Ann (Marsh) Robertson Papers.

0001                Introductory Materials. 7 frames.

0008                Folder 1, Eliza Anne (Marsh) Robertson, Diary

and Scrapbook, 1849-1856. 117 frames.

0125                Folder 2, Typed Transcription of Diary and

Scrapbook, 1849-1856. 135 frames.

0260                Folder 3, Letters and Recipes, 1872 and Undated.

22 frames.

 

 

Ruggles, Daniel Letter, Mss. 2798, 1861 [New Orleans, Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 17, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Daniel Ruggles (1810-1897), a native of Massachusetts and former U.S. Army officer, was a general in the Confederate States Army.  Ruggles led the Second Division in the Battle of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 1862.

            This collection consists of one item, a letter, 2 December 1861, of Daniel Ruggles.  The letter was written from New Orleans, Louisiana, to Capt. George W. Holmes, the commander of the military unit called the “Ruggles Guard,” responding to a request for arms and commenting on the social positions of the men composing the unit.

 

Saunders, William Page Papers, 1854 and 1856, New Orleans and Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana.  Location:  Reel 14, Antebellum Southern Plantations.

            This small collection consists of two items concerning a slave woman owned by William Page Saunders of New Orleans, Louisiana.  Included is a bill of sale for a slave named “Emeline or Eveline,” from Lewis Brown of Missouri to William Page Saunders of New Orleans, dated May 11, 1854, and a letter dated April 26, 1856, from F. L. Claiborne to Saunders.  In the letter, Claiborne, who had purchased the slave from Saunders, stated that Eveline had a bad cough and a diseased leg, but that he intended to keep her and try to cure her.

0602                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0605                Letter, 2 December 1861. 3 frames.

 

TOP

 

S

Savoy, Joseph Family Papers, 1856-1909 Assumption Parish, Louisiana; Location: Reel 15; Records of Southern Plantation, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Joseph Savoy was a sugar planter on Bayou Lafourche in Assumption Parish. This collection includes some family correspondence, along with other letters pertaining to the election of 1900. The majority of the collection consists of business records and accounts, and records of sugar and molasses production and sales.

0337                Introductory Materials. 2 frames.

0339                Family Correspondence, 1861-1909. 30 frames.

0369                Business Correspondence, 1856-1859. 8 frames.

0377                Business Correspondence, 1861-1869. 23 frames.

0400                Business Correspondence, 1870-1876. 20 frames.

0420                Business Correspondence, 1877-1879. 22 frames.

0442                Business Correspondence, 1883-1884. 2 frames.

0444                Miscellaneous, 1857-1887 and Undated. 14

frames.

 

Sayers, Joseph Draper Papers, 1834-1911 [Austin and Bastrop, Texas; also District of Columbia and Mississippi] Location: Reel 21; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            Joseph D. Sayers was a U.S. congressman and governor of Texas.

0804                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0809                Omissions List. 1 frame.

[Note: No Materials from this Collection were filmed].

 

Schmidt, Gustavus Correspondence, Mss. 2133, 1861-1863 [New Orleans, Louisiana; also Mississippi, Tennessee, and Virginia].  Location:  Reel 18A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Gustavus Schmidt was a New Orleans, Louisiana, attorney.  His sons, Charles E. Schmidt and Albert J. Schmidt, both enlisted as Confederate States Army soldiers.  Charles Schmidt enlisted in the Crescent Regiment, Louisiana Infantry.  Albert Schmidt served as a private in the Ascension Cannoniers, Louisiana Artillery.

            This collection consists of correspondence, 1861-1863, of Gustavus Schmidt.  The correspondence includes three letters from his son Albert and a letter from his son Charles.  Albert J. Schmidt’s correspondence comments on his military service; travel to Goodson, Virginia; his detail in Richmond, Virginia, as a clerk in the Quartermaster Department; and his experiences in other camps.  An 1862 letter from Charles E. Schmidt relates his journey on a train to Canton, Madison County, Mississippi; comments on the hospitality of Canton civilians; and describes and encampment near Grand Junction, Tennessee.

0001                Introductory Materials. 7 frames.

0008                Correspondence, 1861-1863. 11 frames.

 

Shaffer, William A. Papers, 1818-1895, Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana.  Location:  Reel 2, Antebellum Southern Plantations. 

            This collection documents the operation of sugar plantations owned by the Shaffer family of Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana, including William A. Shaffer (1797-1887), sugar planter; his sons Thomas J. Shaffer (1843-1915) and John J. Shaffer (fl. 1876-1906), sugar planters and Confederate veterans; and John Dalton Shaffer (fl. 1875-1919), sugar planter, lawyer, and state senator.  The Shaffers’ plantations, all in Terrebonne Parish, were Crescent Farm, Magnolia, Anna, and Ardoyne.

            The forty-two volume collection consists of plantation journals, account books, scrapbooks, and various types of financial and legal papers.  The plantation journals contain brief daily records of agricultural activities, business transactions, and personal events, 1825-1846 and 1876-1918 (with occasional gaps).  A diary of John Dalton Shaffer includes records of treatment of sick Italian workers in 1905.  The scrapbooks provide some information on family members, particularly on John Dalton Shaffer’s career as a state senator and Democratic party leader, 1906-1918, and on Thomas J. and John J. Shaffer’s involvement in Confederate veterans associations, 1905-1911.  They also include clippings on sugar legislation and the race question, 1884-1919, New Orleans, and the Louisiana gubernatorial campaign of 1919.  The financial and legal papers date chiefly from the 1830s to the 1850s and include bills of sale for land and slaves.

 

Biographical Note.

            William A. Shaffer (1797-1887) was a sugar planter who owned Crescent Farm, a plantation in Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana.  He married Emilie Bourgeois (fl. 1830s).  It is believed that he had two sons:  Thomas J. Shaffer (1843-1915), who owned Anna Plantation in Terrebonne Parish, and John J. Shaffer (fl. 1876-1906), who owned Magnolia Plantation, also in Terrebonne Parish.  Both Thomas and John served in the Confederate army and were subsequently heavily involved in Confederate veterans associations.  John Dalton Shaffer (fl. 1875-1919), believed to have been the son of John J. Shaffer, was a lawyer, state senator, and the owner of Ardoyne Plantation, near Houma, in Terrebonne Parish.

            A list of omissions from the William A. Shaffer Papers is provided on reel 3, frame 0188, and includes Subseries 2.1.2, Plantation Records of John J. Shaffer, 1876-1906; Subseries 2.1.3, Plantation Records of John Dalton Shaffer, 1890-1905; Subseries 2.1.4, Other Plantation Records, 1910-1918; Subseries 2.2, Scrapbooks, 1875-1921; and Miscellaneous Account Books, 1921 and Undated.

0548                Introductory Materials. 14 frames.

0562                Description of Series 1. 1 frame.

0563                Folder 1, 1818-1836. 79 frames.

0642                Folder 2, 1837-1839. 92 frames.

0734                Folder 3, 1840-1849. 48 frames.

0782                Folder 4, 1850-1857. 55 frames.

0839                Folder 5, 1864-1895. 88 frames.

0927                Folder 6, Undated. 26 frames.

0953                Folder 7, Bills, Receipts, Promissory Notes, and

Checks, 1846-1887 and Undated. 137 frames.

1090                Folder 8, Tax Returns, Bills, Receipts, and

Licenses, 1860-1887 and Undated. 105 frames.

 

Shealy, John N. Papers, Mss. 466, 1859-1862 [Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi].  Location:  Reel 18A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            John Noah Shealy and Eugenia “Jennie” Burson, both of Georgia, were wed in 1859; they had two sons.  Shealy served as a lieutenant in the 47th Alabama Regiment during the Civil War.

            This collection consists of fifty-one items, papers, 1859-1862, of John N. Shealy.  The 1862 correspondence, written while John was in field service, describes Confederate States Army soldiers’ hardships, illness, and suffering under Stonewall Jackson’s command.  Jennie wrote about family affairs and her sale of cotton.  Shealy was ill during most of his service in the army and he wrote to Jennie about his own illness and difficulties in obtaining a furlough to recuperate.  While in a field hospital, Shealy describes the horrors of war from the standpoint of a sick man.  He later died in the field.

0019                Introductory Materials. 8 frames.

0027                Papers, 1859-1862. 133 frames.

 

Simpson and Brumby Family Papers, 1847-1865, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana; also Mississippi.  Location:  Reel 7, Antebellum Southern Plantations. 

            Sarah Catherine Brumby Simpson (1840-1915), daughter of John Greening Brumby and Catherine Sarah Remley Brumby of Benton and Goodman, Mississippi, is the central figure in these papers.  Sarah had at least five brothers and three sisters.  In 1858, she married Richard Simpson (d. 1871) of Covington, Louisiana.  A businessman, Simpson traveled frequently throughout Louisiana and Texas.  Together they had four children.

            Although Sarah Brumby Simpson was the recipient of the vast majority of the letters in the collection, the insight they provide into her life is limited.  Most illuminating on her personal affairs are letters she received from her husband, discussing their children and finances.  The lives of her other siblings emerge more fully in the letters.  They shared with her news of their travels, family events, and activities, and freely discussed their feelings and worries about family, political, and social events.

            A handful of letters are addressed to other family members, including Sarah’s brother-in-law, Augustus Vaughan.  Civil War letters provide information on troop conditions and civilian hardships, especially in Tennessee and Mississippi.  Other topics of interest in the letters are courtship; Arnoldus Brumby’s medical practice; postwar economic conditions; religious fervor among women in Marietta, Georgia, during the Civil War; and family life.

            The papers are useful for the study of a variety of topics, including family life in the antebellum and postwar South, the experiences of civilians and soldiers in the Civil War, and social and religious life in Louisiana and Mississippi.  The Civil War letters are the fullest in terms of their emotional and factual depth.

 

Biographical Note.

            Sarah Catherine Brumby Simpson (1840-1915) was the daughter of John Greening Brumby and Catherine Sarah Remley Brumby of Benton and Goodman, Mississippi.  Sarah Catherine was referred to sometimes as Sarah, sometimes as Sallie, and sometimes as Kate.  She had at least five brothers, Arnoldus S. (1832-1892), Robert E. (1834-1864), John (1838-1863?), James R. (b. 1846), and Thomas Micajah (b. 1852), and three sisters, Virginia Carolina (1836-1915), Mary E., called Mollie (1844-1907), and Emily (b. 1848).

            In 1858 Sarah Brumby married Richard Simpson (d. 1871) of Covington, Louisiana, and moved thee with him.  Simpson traveled frequently throughout Louisiana and Texas as a business agent for several clients.  The Simpsons had four children, Mary Ellis, Pearl, Eloise, and Richard.  A letter of June 4, 1871, mentions that after Simpson’s death in 1871 Sarah considered opening a millinery shop with one of her sisters, but no evidence appears to document whether she ever went through with her plans.  Letters addressed to her show that Sarah lived in Knoxville, Tennessee, in 1906, and in St. Petersburg, Florida, from 1907 until her death in 1915.

            Two of Sarah’s brothers, Robert E. and John Greening Brumby, Jr., lost their lives in the Civil War.  Her brother, Arnoldus, studied medicine and became a physician in Holmes County, Mississippi.  Another brother, James R., after serving in the Confederate army, became a cooper in Marietta, Georgia.  In the 1870s he set up a chair manufacturing firm there, being joined by his brother Thomas Micajah Brumby.  Thomas later left their partnership to set up a competing company.  Sarah’s sister, Mary E. (called Mollie), married Augustus Vaughn and lived in Goodman, Mississippi, and later Little Rock, Arkansas.  Her sister, Virginia Carolina, married a Mr. Wellons and lived in Marietta, Georgia.  Emily lived in Fort Gaines, Florida.

            Only sketchy information is available on Sarah’s children.  Her daughter, Mary Ellis (called Nellie), married James C. Talley, and her daughter, Eloise, married T. A. Gramling.  Another daughter, Pearl, remained unmarried.  No evidence appears about whether or who her son Richard (also called Dick and Bud) married.

            A list of omissions from the Simpson and Brumby Family Papers is provided on reel 7, frame 0860, and consists of Subseries 1.2, Correspondence, 1866-1909, and Series 2, Other Papers, 1860-1945.

0669                Introductory Materials. 11 frames.

0680                Description of Subsereis 1.1. 1 frame.

0681                Folder 1, 1847, 1857-1858. 68 frames.

0749                Folder 2, 1860-1865. 111 frames.

0860                List of Omissions from the Simpson and Brumby Family Papers. 1 frame.

 

Slack Family Papers, 1805-1944, Iberville Parish, Louisiana; also Massachusetts and New York.  Location:  Reel 13, Antebellum Southern Plantations. 

            The Slack family of Iberville Parish, Louisiana, included Eliphalet Slack (1778-1843), who moved there from Weston, Massachusetts, in 1829-1830, and Henry Richmond Slack (1835-1890), member of the Yale College class of 1855, sugar planter, and Confederate officer.  The chief agricultural pursuit of the Slack family in Louisiana changed from cotton growing to sugar growing around 1834.

            The documents include personal and family correspondence and financial, legal, and military papers, chiefly from the 1830s-1890s.  The bulk of the collection consists of correspondence among members of the Slack family in Iberville Parish, Louisiana; Weston, Massachusetts; Albany County, New York; and the related Woolfolk family, friends, and associates.  Topics include family matters, local events, schooling, and agricultural pursuits.  There are also numerous Civil War letters from Henry Richmond Slack, with the 1st Louisiana Cavalry Regiment in Tennessee, Kentucky, and elsewhere, to his wife concerning personal, military, and political matters.  Financial and legal papers consist chiefly of estate, slave, agricultural, and shipping records of the Slack and related Woolfolk, Cutter, and Benjamin families.  Included is an 1867 farming contract between Henry Richmond Slack and some freedmen.  Other items include documents concerning the formation of a “law and order” organization, set up, apparently in Iberville Parish, in 1878, and a Slack family genealogy compiled by William Samuel Slack (1869-1944) in 1930.

 

Biographical Note

            Eliphalet Slack (1778-1843) was one of ten children of John Slack (d.1823) of Weston, Massachusetts.  Among Eliphalet’s sisters and brothers were:  Elizabeth (1786-1873); Robert Fuller (1793-1853); Caroline Matilda (1795-1842); and Granville (1798-1858).

            In 1819, Eliphalet Slack married Abigail Cutter (1798-1840) of Weston, Massachusetts, whose brother, Leonard Cutter, died in 1824, leaving property in Iberville Parish, Louisiana.  Eliphalet was administrator of both his father’s and Cutter’s estates.  He went to Louisiana about 1824-1825 to examine the Cutter property, and settled his family there about 1829-1830, first at Plaquemine and later at Bay Farm on Bayou Grosse Tete.  Bay Farm was purchased by Eliphalet Slack from the other Cutter heirs about 1840.  It was chiefly a cotton plantation until around 1834.

            The children of Eliphalet and Abigail Cutter Slack were:  William Augustus (1820-1843); Charles Albert (1824-1857), who married Martha Bennett, daughter of Mrs. J. W. Stillwell, who lived on Bayou Grosse Tete; John Dutton (1832-1864), who married Mary Singleton Moore; and Henry Richmond (1835-1890), who married Louisiana Tennessee Woolfolk (1840-1920), daughter of Austin Woolfolk (1796-1847) of Bayou Grosse Tete.

            When Eliphalet Slack died in 1843, his wife and oldest son having died before him, he left in Louisiana three sons, the oldest of whom, Charles A., was only nineteen.  The three boys kept in close touch with their relatives at Weston, Massachusetts, and at Guilderland and Albany, New York.  The two younger brothers went north to be educated, while Charles A. managed the plantation (Bay Farm) at Grosse Tete.  About 1844, cotton was abandoned at Bay Farm in favor of sugar cane.

            Louisiana Woolfolk Slack had three brothers and a sister:  Joseph Biggers Woolfolk (1833-1904); Austin Woolfolk (1837-1871); Sarah Jane Woolfolk (1842-1915), who married William Howard Simrall; and Samuel Richard Woolfolk (1847-1859).

0178                Introductory Materials. 17 frames.

0195                Description of Subseries 1.1. 3 frames.

0198                Folder 1, 1825-1827. 18 frames.

0216                Folder 2, 1828-1832. 23 frames.

0239                Folder 3, 1833-1836. 21 frames.

0260                Folder 4, 1837-1839. 31 frames.

0291                Folder 5, 1840-1843. 47 frames.

0338                Folder 6, 1844-1849. 69 frames.

0417                Folder 7, 1850-1851. 32 frames.

0449                Folder 8, 1852. 61 frame.

0510                Folder 9, 1853-1854. 81 frames.

0591                Folder 10, 1855. 77 frames.

0668                Folder 11, 1856-1859. 97 frames.

0765                Folder 12, 1860. 52 frames.

0817                Folder 13, 1861. 41 frames.

0858                Folder 14, 1862. 102 frames.

0960                Folder 15, 1863. 5 frames.

0965                Description of Subseries 1.2. 1 frame.

0966                Folder 16, 1866-1867. 46 frames.

1012                Folder 17, 1868-1917. 54 frames.

Reel 14

0001                Description of Series 2. 2 frames.

0003                Folder 18, 1805-1824. 32 frames.

0035                Folder 19, 1825-1832. 51 frames.

0086                Folder 20, 1833-1837. 33 frames.

0119                Folder 21, 1850-1865. 25 frames.

0144                Folder 22, 1866-1875. 81 fames.

0225                Folder 23, 1876-1885. 29 frames.

0254                Folder 24, Undated. 25 frames.

0279                Description of Series 3. 1 frame.

0280                Folder 25, School Papers, 1846-1851. 14 frames.

0294                Folder 26, Civil War Papers, 1864. 7 frames.

0301                Folder 27, Rev. William Samuel Slack, The Slack

Family. 1930. 132 frames.

0433                Folder 28, Miscellaneous Items, 1858-1944 and

Undated. 19 frames.

 

Smith, Ashbel Papers, 1823-1926 [Austin, Cedar Bayou, Galveston, Harris County, Houston, and Washington City, Texas] Location: Reel 21 and 22; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            The collection consists of correspondence, letterbooks, legal papers, a military order book, and speeches, and it also includes material related to the Confederate Trans-Mississippi Department. Smith was first a captain of the First Texas Infantry Regiment, Confederate Army. Correspondents include Confederate Generals P. O. Hebert, Samuel Cooper, and John B. Magruder, Union General Edward R. S. Canby; and former President of the Republic of Texas Sam Houston.

0810                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0815                Omissions List. 1 frame.

0816                Inventory. 1 frame.

0817                Letters, 1861. 30 frames.

0847                Letters, 1862. 46 frames.

0893                Letters, 1863. 36 frames.

0929                Letters, 1864. 160 frames.

Reel 22

0003                Letters, 1865. 237 frames.

0240                Letterbook, October 1863-February 1865. 75

frames.

0315                Letterbook, March-June 1865. 46 frames.

0361                Military Order Book, December 1863-February

1864. 44 frames.

0405                Military Orders and Reports. 147 frames.

0552                Record Book of Confederate Correspondence,

1863-1865. 226 frames.

0778                Confederate States of America, Army, Trans

Mississippi, General and Special Orders, 1863-1865. 199 frames.

 

Smith, Benjamin R. Letter, Mss. 1676, 1861 [Alexandria, Louisiana; also Virginia].  Location:  Reel 18A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Benjamin R. Smith enlisted in the 2nd Louisiana Infantry Regiment on 9 May 1861.  He was wounded twice during the war but returned to duty each time.  Smith continued to serve in the Confederate States Army until 1865, when his unit surrendered at Appomattox, Virginia.

            This collection consists of one item, a letter, 23 August 1861, of Benjamin R. Smith.  In the letter from camp Magruder, Virginia, to his friend R.H. Carnal of Alexandria, Louisiana, Smith discusses Carnal’s recent visit to Richmond; the proximity of Camp Magruder to Richmond; the general enthusiasm and confidence of his unit; the manner in which Col. Levy has heightened the efficiency of his company; and his eagerness to see some combat action.

0160                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0164                Letter, 23 August 1861. 5 frames.

 

Snider, William E. Letters, Mss. 2121, 1862-1863 [Staunton, Virginia; also West Virginia].  Location:  Reel 18A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of three items, letters, 1862-1863, of William E. Snider. Snider’s letters to his mother and father, Daniel, describe his condition in a military hospital in Staunton, Virginia.  A letter from Snider’s brother describes his separation from his military unit in West Virginia because of an ankle injury and relates news about Snider’s forthcoming discharge.

0169                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0172                Letters, 1862-1863. 8 frames.

 

 

 

Snyder, Dudley Hiram Family Papers, 1851-1923 [Cooke County, Georgetown, Hartley County, Lamb County, Mitchell County, Round Rock, Stonewall, and Tom Green County, Texas] Location: Reel 22; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This Collection contains order book, muster rolls, and correspondence by Snyder during the Civil War. Snyder served in the Fourth Texas Infantry Regiment, Confederate Army.

0977                Introductory Materials. 6 frames.

0983                Omissions List. 1 frame.

0983                Inventory. 1 frame.

0984                Order Book of the Second Battalion, Fourth Regiment Texas Volunteers, 1861-1862. 27 frames.

 

 

Spaight, Ashley Wood Papers, 1826-1912 [Austin, Galveston, and Liberty County, Texas; also Alabama and Louisiana] Location: Reel 23; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection consists of correspondence, financial and legal papers, reminiscences, and muster rolls relating to Spaight’s service in the Confederate Army. Spaight was a captain of an independent cavalry company (Moss Bluff Rebels) and was later a colonel of Texas volunteer infantry. Correspondents include Confederate Generals John B. Magruder and Richard Taylor.

0001                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0006                Letters, 1871-1908. 41 frames.

0047                Financial Papers, 1826, 1870-1885, and 1906

1912. 34 frames.

0081                Legal Papers, 1839 and 1856-1902. 73 frames.

0154                Muster Roll of Captain Spaight’s Cavalry Company

(Moss Bluff Rebels), April 21, 1862; Papers relating to Colonel Spaight’s Regiment of Texas Volunteers, September 2, 1863- June 30, 1865. 77 frames.

0231                Roster and History of Colonel Spaight’s Regiment,

November 30, 1864- January 1881. 16 frames.

 

Standifer, Thomas C. Papers, Mss. 3266, 1864-1898 [Ruston, Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 18A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of six items, papers, 1864-1898, of Thomas C. Standifer, a lieutenant colonel in the 12th Louisiana Regiment.  Documents relate to his Civil War military career, including special field orders to proceed to Alexandria, Louisiana, to arrest absentees, 18 August 1864; a parole of honor, 31 August 1865; a passport for Shreveport, Louisiana, and Tyler, Texas, 31 May 1865; an appointment as aide to the General Commanding of the United Confederate Veterans, 28 November 1891; and two memorials to Standifer after his death, 1897 and 1898.

0193                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0197                Papers, 1864-1898. 15 frames.

 

Stephens, John F. Correspondence, Mss. 882, 1861-1864 [Bienville Parish, Louisiana; also Virginia].  Location:  Reel 18A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            John F. Stephens (1813-1884) was a resident of Sparta, Bienville Parish, Louisiana.  His sons, Edward L. Stephens, W. Ezra Denson, and Henry M. King, were members of Company C, 9th Louisiana Infantry Regiment, Confederate States Army.

            This collection consists of four items, correspondence, 1861-1864, of John F. Stephens.  Letters, 1861, written by Ezra Denson from Camp Beauregard and Louisiana Hospital, Virginia, describe the commands of Confederate generals Joseph E. Johnston and P. G. T. Beauregard.  A letter, 1863, from Edward Stephens, written from camp near Fredericksburg, Virginia, describes camp conditions and the health of soldiers from Bienville Parish.  A letter, 1864, written by Henry King from Strawsburg, Virginia, gives details of the deaths of Edward L. Stephens and W. Ezra Denson and the condition of the surviving members of Company C.

0212                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0216                Correspondence, 1861-1864. 15 frames.

 

Stratton, Joseph B. Papers, Mss. 464, 1329, 1746-1916 [Natchez, Mississippi].  Location:  Reel 18A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Joseph Buck Stratton was a Presbyterian minister of Natchez, Mississippi.  The son of a wealthy New Jersey merchant, Stratton was educated at Princeton, received a law degree, and practiced law from about 1837 to 1840.  At that time he entered Princeton Theological Seminary to study the ministry and was ordained in 1843.  Stratton was installed as pastor of the Natchez Presbyterian Church that same year, where he remained for fifty years.

            This collection consists of twenty items and fifty-one volumes, papers, 1746-1916 (bulk 1843-1903), of Joseph B. Stratton.  Items include eighteenth-century deeds for land in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania; copies of some of his sermons; an undated map of Mexico; plans for the construction of a house and other structures; and a certificate to perform marriages in Mississippi.

            A list of omissions from Joseph B. Stratton Papers, Mss. 464, 1329, 1746-1916, is provided on Reel 18, Frame 0258.  Omissions consist of Volumes 1-51.  Dr. Stratton’s forty-six-volume diary, 1843-1903, including many Civil War-related entries, could not be microfilmed due to donor restrictions, but it is open to researchers on-site at the Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections.

0231                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0236                Folder 1, Papers, 1746-1789. 9 frames.

0245                Folder 2, Papers, 1835-1865. 13 frames.

0258                List of Omissions from Joseph B. Stratton Papers,

Mss. 464, 1329, 1746-1916. 1 frame.

 

 

Stubbs, Jefferson W. and Family Papers, Mss. 567, 1861-1895 [Gloucester County, Virginia].  Location:  Reel 18A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Jefferson W. Stubbs of Gloucester County, Virginia, operated a store in Cappahousie both during and after the Civil War.  He and his wife, Mollie, had at least four sons and a daughter—William J., James N., Jefferson, Thomas J. and Lucy.  James attended the College of William and Mary and the State Normal College of Virginia in Williamsburg.  All of the sons except Thomas fought in the Civil War.

            This collection consists of 121 items, papers, 1861-1895, of Jefferson W. Stubbs and family.  Items include personal and business papers of Stubbs and other family members.  Civil War correspondence includes letters to Stubbs from his sons, William J., James, and Jefferson, in various towns and army camps in Virginia; letters from John L. Hibble, brother of Mrs. Jefferson W. Stubbs and Confederate States Army captain and quartermaster in the 26th Regiment, Virginia Volunteers; and letters from various residents of Gloucester County serving in the army.  The latter items concern, the event of their deaths, the disposition of these soldiers’ personal effects and care for their homes and families.  Letters written by James while attending Virginia Military Institute describe school accommodations, classes, and moot courts.  Topics addressed in Civil War era correspondence include camp conditions, illness, troop movements, deserters, Federal gunboats, the high cost of living, and battles.  The Peninsular campaign, Yorktown, Fort Brown, Seven Pines, James River, Chickahominy, Drewry’s Bluff, Virginia, and the Antietam campaign, Maryland, are some of the places and events mentioned.  Reconstruction era correspondence is chiefly commercial and includes reports from various Baltimore, Maryland, factors (e.g., Fergusson, Tyson & Co., and Samuel Turbett).

            A list of omissions from Jefferson W. Stubbs and Family Papers, Mss. 567, 1861-1895, is provided on Reel 18, Frame 0524. Omissions consist of empty envelopes.

0259                Introductory Materials. 17 frames.

0276                Folder 1, Papers, 1860-1862. 83 frames.

0359                Folder 2, Papers, 1863-1865. 69 frames.

0428                Folder 3, Papers, 1867-1869. 31 frames.

0459                Folder 4, Papers, 1870-1995 and Undated. 65

frames.

0524                List of omissions from Jefferson W. Stubbs and

Family Papers, Mss. 567, 1861-1895. 1 frame.

 

 

 

 

Surget, E. Letter, Mss. 4517, 1863 [District of Western Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 18A Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of one item, a letter, 9 April 1863, from E. Surget, assistant adjutant general to Gen. R. Taylor.  The letter requests that Capt. and Asst. Adj. Gen. A. H. May be appointed to serve in the Adjutant General’s Department of the District of Western Louisiana.

0525                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0528                Letter, 9 April 1863. 2 frames.

 

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T

Tabor, Frederick R. Papers, Mss. 412, 607, 631, 1859-1862 [St. James Parish, Louisiana; also Mississippi].  Location:  Reel 18A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Frederick R. Tabor (1839-1863) enlisted in the Confederate States Army in 1861.  He served in the 18th Louisiana Regiment until March 1862, when he was admitted with a chronic illness to a Confederate States Army hospital in Jackson, Mississippi.  He was sent home to Convent, St. James Parish, Louisiana, in February 1863, and died there.

            This collection consists of twenty-eight items, papers, 1859-1862, of Frederick R. Taber.  Items include correspondence, artistic sketches, papers related to Taber’s illness, and writings by Taber.  Letters, 1861-1862, in Mss. 412, from Taber at Camp Moore, Tangipahoa Parish, and Camp Roman, New Orleans, Louisiana, to his parents and sister discuss the quality of life at camp; relate his opinions of officers and other acquaintances; tell of the steady progression of his illness; and mention other family matters.  Papers, 1859-1862, in Mss. 631 include correspondence with family members; a poem by Frederick Taber to sister, Lillie; a May 1862 furlough pass granting permission for Taber to travel to Corinth, Mississippi; and a June 1862 statement signed by Eugean Palmer, M.D., certifying that Taber’s illness has rendered him unfit for duty in the Confederate States Army. Three updated sketchbooks, Mss. 607, belonging to Frederick Taber contain drawings of people, landscapes, wildlife, and dwellings.

0530                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0535                Mss. 631, Papers, 1859 and 1861-1862. 11

frames.

0546                Mss. 412, Papers, 1861-1862. 37 frames.

0583                Mss. 607, Sketchbook 1, Undated. 56 frames.

0639                Mss. 607, Sketchbook 2, Undated. 28 frames.

0667                Mss. 607, Sketchbook 3, Undated. 13 frames.

 

Tamplin, William H. Letters, Mss. 3015, 1862-1865 [Panola County, Texas; also Arkansas and Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 18A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            William H. Tamplin was a native of Longbranch, Panola County, Texas, and a member of the 11th Texas Regiment, Company E, Confederate States of America.  His brother was Benjamin F. Tamplin.

            This collection consists of twenty items, letters, 1862-1865 and undated, of Benjamin F. Tamplin and William H. Tamplin.  The letters are addressed to Retincia, Benjamin F. Tamplin’s wife.  They are written from camps in Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas and describe camp life, conditions in camp hospitals, and the Red River expedition in Louisiana.  Also included are poems composed by Benjamin Tamplin.

0680                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0684                Letters, 1862-1865 and Undated. 42 frames.

 

Taylor, Miles Family Papers, Mss. 1378, 1448, 1636, 1821-1954 [Assumption Parish, Louisiana; also Maryland, Virginia, and New York].  Location:  Reel 18A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            A native of Sarasota Springs, New York, Miles Taylor (1805-1873) was a congressional representative, lawyer, judge, and sugar planter of Assumption Parish, Louisiana.  He married Elizabeth A. Breeden, and they had two sons, Thomas (b. ca. 1842) and Searing (b. ca. 1845).  He owned Scattery Plantation on Bayou Lafourche.  Thomas served in the 8th Louisiana Volunteers during the Civil War, fought in Virginia, and was wounded at Sharpsburg, Maryland.  He was also a planter, inventor, and writer.  Thomas settled in Fauquier County, Virginia, after the Civil War and married Annie E. Lawrason of Baltimore, Maryland.

            This collection consists of two hundred items, papers, 1821-1954 (bulk 1821-1890), of Miles Taylor and family.  Items consist of family letters, photographs, and genealogical and biographical material of the Taylor family of Assumption Parish, Louisiana.  Included is the correspondence of Eliza Breeden Taylor with her mother and sister in Thibodaux and Carrollton, Louisiana.  The personal papers of Miles Taylor include a copy of his will, reprints of speeches in Congress (regarding Preston Brooks’s caning of Charles Sumner, the Kansas question, and tariffs, 1856-1857), and letters to his son Thomas concerning his own financial situation and family matters.  The Civil War letters of Thomas Taylor relate his unit’s withdrawal from winter quarters at Manassas, Virginia, his participation at the Battle of Gaines’s Mill and Cold Harbor, the election of officers in his unit, and casualties.  He also reports his convalescence as a prisoner of war at Saratoga Springs, New York, 1863.  Additional letters from Thomas describe the rescue of passengers from the collision of two steamers, Dixie and Folly; his trip from New Orleans, via Cuba, to Baltimore, Maryland, prior to his marriage; and social life at Saratoga Springs during his wedding trip, 1866.  Letter to Thomas from his uncle, Julius Taylor, relate financial problems with his Virginia farm and additional family news.  Also present are numerous photographs and family portraits and an undated autobiographical sketch of U.S. Army General Thomas Thomson Taylor, nephew of Miles Taylor and a member of the 47th Ohio Volunteers during the Civil War.

            A list of omissions from Miles Taylor Family Papers, Mss. 1378, 1448, 1636, 1821-1954, is provided on Reel 19, Frame 0287. Omissions consist of Folders 10-13, Writings, Printed Items and Newspapers.

0726                Introductory Materials. 28 frames.

0754                Folder 1, Papers, 1821, 1824, and 1832-1836. 47

frames.

0801                Folder 2, Papers, 1841-1849. 55 frames.

0856                Folder 3, Papers, 1856-1857 and 1860-1867. 85

frames.

0941                Folder 4, Civil War Pass (Framed), 1863. 2

frames.

Reel 19

0001                Folder 5, Papers, 1865-1869. 56 frames.

0057                Folder 6, Papers, 1870-1879. 31 frames.

0088                Folder 7, Papers, 1880-1888. 35 frames.

0123                Folder 8, Papers, 1890, 1899, and 1924-1934. 23

frames.

0146                Folder 9, Papers, Undated. 87 frames.

0233                Folder 14, Pictures, “Andrew’s Butch and Kiki’s

Jupe,” 1854. 3 frames.

0236                Folder 15, Pictures, Caleb Hollowell’s School,

Undated. 2 frames.

0238                Folder 16, Pictures, Mrs. Tench C. Coxe, Undated.

2 frames.

0240                Folder 17, Pictures, Margaret May Dashiell,

Undated. 3 frames.

0243                Folder 18, Pictures, “Jack and Sadie,” Undated. 2

frames.

0245                Folder 19, Pictures, Lyceum, Undated. 2 frames.

0247                Folder 20, Pictures, John Fox May, Undated. 2

frames.

0249                Folder 21, Pictures, Mary Taylor May, 1871 and

Undated. 2 frames.

0251                Folder 22, Pictures, Mary Taylor May, Undated. 2

frames.

0253                Folder 23, Pictures, John May and Thomas M.

May, 1919 and Undated. 2 frames.

0255                Folder 24, Pictures, Annie Steele, Undated. 2

frames.

0257                Folder 25, Pictures, Miles Steele, 1872 and

Undated. 2 frames.

0259                Folder 26, Pictures, Molly Steele, Undated. 2

frames.

0261                Folder 27, Pictures, Sarah Honeywood Steele,

Undated. 2 frames.

0263                Folder 28, Pictures, Thomas and Annie L. Taylor,

1867 and Undated. 2 frames.

0265                Folder 29, Pictures, Taylor Family Shield,

Undated. 2 frames.

0267                Folder 30, Pictures, Julius Taylor Family,

Undated. 4 frames.

0271                Folder 31, Pictures, Meg Taylor, Undated. 2

frames.

0273                Folder 32, Pictures, Miles Taylor, Undated. 4

frames.

0277                Folder 33, Pictures, Sarah Searing Taylor,

Undated. 2 frames.

0279                Folder 34, Pictures, Searing Taylor, Undated. 2

frames.

0281                Folder 35, Pictures, Thomas Taylor, ca. 1861,

1863, and Undated. 2 frames.

0283                Folder 36, Pictures, Thomas Taylor and Friends,

Undated. 2 frames.

0285                Folder 37, Pictures, Thomas Taylor and Friends,

Undated. 2 frames.

0287                List of Omissions from Miles Taylor Family

Papers, Mss. 1378, 1448, 1636, 1821-1954. 1 frame.

 

Terry, William and Family Papers, Mss. 915, 1766-1896 [Adams, Claiborne, and Jefferson Counties, Mississippi; also Virginia].  Location:  Reel 19, Confederate Military Manuscripts., Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            The William Terry family resided in Pine Woods, Jefferson County, Mississippi.  Sarah, daughter of William and Martha Ker Terry, married Evans S. Jefferies.  The Jefferies family lived on Greenwood Plantation, Claiborne County, Mississippi.  The Baillio and Ellett Families are related by marriage to the Jefferies family.

            This collection consists of sixty-seven items, papers, 1766-1896 (bulk 1860-1869), of William Terry and family.  Papers consist of personal correspondence of the Terry and related Jefferies families, in addition to miscellaneous items of the Ellett and Baillio families.  Letters, 1821-1859, discuss personal and family matters.  Notable correspondent Henry Hughes, an attorney of Port Gibson, Mississippi, comments on the settlement of Martha Miller Jefferies’ estate, the Democratic National Convention at Charleston, South Carolina, and issues relative to his participation in the Civil War.  Civil War letters written by members of the Jefferies family comment on troop movements, battles (e.g., Manassas, Yorktown, and Fort Pickens), and concern for African American slaves and property.

0288                Introductory Materials. 15 frames.

0303                Folder 1, Papers, 1766, 1795, 1821-1859. 51

frames.

0354                Folder 2, Papers, 1860-1896. 77 frames.

0431                Folder 3, Papers, Undated. 39 frames.

 

Texada, Lewis and Family Papers, Mss. 2985, 1830-1939 [Rapides Parish, Louisiana; also Virginia and Mexico].  Location:  Reel 19A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Lewis Texada was a planter of Bayou Rapides, Rapides Parish, Louisiana.  Arnaud Preot was a professor at the Farmville Female College.  Henry Watkins Allen was governor of Louisiana during the Civil War.

            This collection consists of 274 items, papers, 1830-1939, of Lewis Texada and family and of the Preot family.  Items pertain to property ownership in Rapides Parish, including property acquired from the estate of Henry A. Bullard, 1845-1866.  Letters, 1864-1866, from Louisiana Governor Henry Watkins Allen discuss wartime conditions in Shreveport, Louisiana, and Allen’s experiences as a Confederate refugee in Mexico.  Papers of Arnaud Preot and family, 1837-1885, concern the management of the Farmville Female College, a girls’ school in Virginia, and include Confederate civilians’ letters, 1861-1864, that discuss wartime conditions, conscription, battles (including Drewry’s Bluff), and public opinions of the war.  The Preot family papers also include sheet music.

            A list of omissions from Lewis Texada and Family Papers, Mss. 2985, 1830-1939, is provided on Reel 19, Fram 0957. Omissions consist of Folders 10-11, printed items, sheet music, newspapers, and empty envelopes.

0470                Introductory Materials. 10 frames.

0480                Folder 1, Preot Family Papers, 1837-1885. 116

frames.

0596                Folder 2, Preot Family Papers, Undated. 103

frames.

0699                Folder 3, Preot Family Papers, Sheet Music, 1873.

21 frames.

0720                Folder 4, Henry W. Allen Letters, 1864-1866. 11

frames.

0731                Folder 5, Lewis Texada and Family Papers, 1830

1859. 29 frames.

0760                Folder 6, lewis Texada and Family Papers, Henry

A. Bullard Estate Papers, 1845-1866. 74 frames.

0834                Folder 7, Lewis Texada and Family Papers, 1860

1899 and Undated. 55 frames.

0889                Folder 8, Lewis Texada and Family Papers, 1900

1929. 35 frames.

0924                Folder 9, Lewis Texada and Family Papers, 1930

1939. 33 frames.

0957                List of Omissions from Lewis Texada and Family

Papers, Mss. 2985, 1830-1939. 1 frame.

 

Texas Second Voluntary Cavalry Clothing Book, 1865 [Texas] Location: Reel 23; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection consists of the clothing book of the Second Texas Volunteer Cavalry. The material shows the clothing allowances and issues to the soldiers of the regiment.

0247                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0250                Texas 2nd Cavalry Regiment: Companies A-C,

Clothing Book. 169 frames.

 

Thibodaux, G. C. Account, Mss. 2133, 1863 [Thibodaux, Louisiana; also Mississippi].  Location:  Reel 21A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            This collection consists of one item, an account, 10-26 July 1863, of G. C. Thibodaux.  The account, in French, describes his experiences as a prisoner of war on the march from Vicksburg, Mississippi, to Thibodaux, Louisiana.  He mentions meeting a well-armed African American regiment near Vicksburg.

0559                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0563                Account, 10-26 July 1863. 9 frames.

 

 

G.H. Tichenour Diary, Mss. 580, 893, 1861-1917 [Williamson County, Mississippi; also Tennessee].  Location:  Reel 22A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Dr. George H. Tichenour (1837-1923) was a native of Kentucky.  He moved to Nashville, Tennessee, in 1859.  Sometime prior to the Civil War he resided in Liberty, Mississippi.  He joined a Confederate States Army unit, the Williamson County, Tennessee, “Dare Devils,” 9 June 1861.  In May of 1862, the company was reorganized and he was elected orderly sergeant of Company B, 2nd Tennessee Cavalry Regiment.  He was commissioned as a recruiting officer on 8 January 1863.  Later in 1863, he was appointed acting assistant surgeon.  Wounded in battle near Memphis, Tennessee, he is said to have developed an antiseptic formula as a result of experiment made upon himself.  Soon after the war, he practiced medicine in Louisiana.  A prominent veteran, he served as commander of Company No. 9, Confederate Veterans’ Cavalry, and was appointed surgeon general under Gen. Lombard of the Louisiana Division, United Confederate Veterans Association.

            This collection consists of two items and three volumes, diaries, 1861-1917 (bulk 1861-1863), of George H. Tichenour.  Civil War diaries, 1861-1863, of George H. Tichenour illustrate daily events, lack of provisions, and battle engagements in Mississippi, Tennessee, Alabama, and Kentucky.  They note the number of dead and wounded and describe the reorganization of the “Dare Devils.”  They also relate the sentiments of soldiers concerning conscription, April 1862, and reference is made to Federal troops deserting to the Confederate side, 22 August 1862.  Other items include printed materials and a photograph of George H. Tichenour, commander of Camp 9, United Confederate Veterans, 1917.

N.B.  A related collection among the holdings of the Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections, Special Collections, Hill Memorial Library, Louisiana State University Libraries, is United

Confederate Veterans Records, Mss. 1357, 1861-1944.

0359                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0363                Diary, 1861-1863. 42 frames.

0405                Folder, Papers, 1895-1917. 63 frames.

 

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U

Union Soldiers, Index to compiled service records of Volunteers who served in organizations from the State of Louisiana. 4 rolls. 16mm. National Archives RG 92. M387 Location: YSC Microfilm Cabinet 3, Drawer 5.

            On the 4 rolls of this microfilm publication is reproduced an alphabetical card index to the compiled service records of volunteer Union soldiers belonging to units from the State of Louisiana. The index contains most of the names of Louisiana Soldiers to whom references were found in the records used in compiling the service records. An index card gives the name of the soldier, his rank, and the unit in which he served. There are cross-references for soldiers’ names that appeared in the records under more than one spelling to show service that soldiers may have had in other units or organizations.

            The supposedly correct name of a volunteer Union soldier from Louisiana may not appear in the index for several reasons. First, he may have served in a unit from another State or in the Regular Army. Second, he may have served under a different name or used a different spelling of his name. Third, proper records of his service may not have been made; or, if made, they may have been lost or destroyed in the confusion that often attended the initial mobilization, subsequent military operations, and disbandment of troops. Fourth, the references to the soldiers in the original records may be so vague that it is not practicable to determine his correct name or the unit in which he served.

            The compiled service records to which the index applies are reproduced in Microcopy 396. The consist of a jacket-envelope for each soldier, labeled with his name and typically containing (1) card abstracts of entries relating to the soldier as found in original muster rolls, returns, hospital rolls, and descriptive books; and (2) the originals of any papers relating solely to the particular soldier. A typical example of a compiled service record is filmed on the first roll of the index reproduced in this microcopy.

            The compiled service records of soldiers belonging to units from the state of Louisiana are arranged according to an organizational breakdown ending with the regiment or the independent battalion or company. Under each unit the service records are arranged alphabetically by soldiers’ surnames. Unless the unit in which a soldier served is known, his compiled service record can be located only through the use of an index, such as the one reproduced in this microcopy, which gives the name of the unit in which he served.

            The compilation of service records of Union soldiers was begun in 1890 under the direction of Capt. Fred C. Ainsworth, head of the Record and Pension Division of the War Department. The abstracts made from the original records were verified by a separate operation of comparison, and great care was taken to ensure that the abstracts and the indexes were accurate.

            Reproductions of specific compiled service records corresponding to entries in the index reproduced in this microcopy may be obtained from the National Archives for a fee. Requests for such reproductions should give the name of the State, the regiment or battalion, and the company for each soldier, exactly as shown in the index.

            The index and the compiled service records referred to above are part of a body of records in the National Archives designated as Record Group 94, Records of the Adjutant General’s Office.

            The National Archives has other records that may contain information relating to Union soldiers from Louisiana. Other series of compiled service records for volunteer soldiers are (1) alphabetical series of records of Union staff officers, (2) medical records for volunteer Union and Mexican War soldiers, and (3) records for non-State organizations, such as U. S. Sharp Shooter, Signal Corps, U. S. Colored Troops, and Veterans Reserve Corps. Information relating to soldiers who served in the Regular Army is recorded in Registers of Enlistments in the U. S. Army, 1798-1914 (reproduced as Microcopy 233), and in other records of The Adjutant Genera’s Office. If an application for a pension was made, additional information about the soldier may be among the pension application files of the Veterans Administration in Record Group 15. Supposed Union military service as a scout, guide, or spy. Evidence of such service may be among the records of the Provost Marshal General in Record Group 110.

 

 

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V

Vandale, Earl Papers, ca. 1819—ca. 1947 [Texas; also Arkansas] Location: Reel 23; Confederate Military Manuscripts University of Texas at Austin

            This collection contains materials relating to various persons and includes amnesty oaths; Texas, Confederate, and U.S. currency; material on an Indian raid at Elm Creek; a call to arms by the territorial governor of New Mexico to resist an invasion by Texas; correspondence; legal documents; accounts; discharge certificates; newspaper clippings; a broadside from Governor Sam Houston to the people of Texas urging them to remain loyal to the Union; the Texas Ordinance of Secession; and Confederate bonds.

0419                Introductory Materials. 47 frames.

0466                Omissions List. 1 frame.

0467                Inventory. 1 frame.

0468                Gray, A. C., Original Amnesty Oath, Dated June

23, 1865, at Houston. 3 frames.

0471                Money Collection. 8 frames.

0479                Elm Creek Indian Raid, Statements of Henry C.

Williams and Thornton K. Hamby who Fought the Indians that Day, October 13, 1864. 7 frames.

0486                Connelly, Henry, Territorial Governor of New

Mexico, Call to Arms to Resist Texas Invasion, September 9, 1861. 3 frames.

0489                Houston, Texas, Male and Female Academy,

Announcement Dated August 11, 1862, Opening Term Subscribed by Superintendent. 3 frames.

0492                Moore, John H., Papers, and Notes of 1856-1858,

1859-1860, 1862, 1863-1866, 1869-1877, 1878-1881; Newspaper Article (Survivor Article_. 25 frames.

0517                Sam Houston, To the People of Texas, 1861. 6

frames.

0523                Broadside Collection [Texas Ordinance of

Secession, February 1861]. 5 frames.

0528                Columbia, South Carolina, Confederate States of

America Loan, 1864. 5 frames.

 

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W

Waddill, George D. Papers, Mss. 891, 893, 1841-1892 [Baton Rouge, Louisiana; also Alabama and Mississippi].  Location:  Reel 3A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            George Daniel Waddill enlisted in the 3rd Louisiana Infantry Regiment, 17 May 1861.  He was appointed as hospital steward later that year and served until late 1862, when he was captured by Union forces and not paroled until 1865.  After the war, he was a druggist in Baton Rouge.

            This collection consists of twenty-one items, papers, 1841-1892 (bulk 1861-1865), of George Waddill.  Items include military furlough and travel passes; Confederate bonds, a railroad ticket on the Mobile and Ohio Railroad to Enterprise, Alabama; military orders assigning Waddill to hospitals in Meridian and Brookhaven, Mississippi; newspaper clippings, an 1865 document granting parole to G.D. Waddill, granted by the U.S. commissioner; and an 1865 Oath of Allegiance to the United States, signed by Waddill.

0202                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0207                Papers, 1841, 1861-1865, and 1892. 35 frames.

 

Wadley, Sarah Lois Papers, 1849-1886, Ouachita and Tangipahoa Parishes, Louisiana; also Mississippi and Georgia; Location: Reel 5 and 6; Southern Women and Their Families in the 19th Century, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Description of the Collection

            Sarah Lois Wadley (b. 1844) was a daughter of William Morrill Wadley (1812?-1882) and Rebecca Barnard (Eviringham) Wadley (fl. 1840—1884). She lived with her family in homes near Macon, Georgia.

            The diary in this collection was kept by Sarah Lois Wadley from August 1859 to October 1865, with occasional additional entries through 1886. Entries in the diary document in significant detail opinions and events in the life of an articulate and alert young woman living with her family near Monroe, Louisiana, just before and during the Civil War. Early entries include a detailed description of a family trip from Amite, Louisiana, to visit relatives in New Hampshire. Extensive entries during the Civil War describe reactions to war news, especially federal efforts to take Vicksburg, Mississippi, by Wadley and others, social life in the vicinity of Monroe, Oakland, and Homer, Louisiana, including comments on freedmen and federal troops, and some activities of Wadley’s father who managed the Vicksburg, Shreveport and Texas Railroad and served in an official capacity for the Confederate government. After the war there are scattered entries, written mostly at Georgia residences, chiefly concerning Wadley family matters. One of the dairy volumes includes miscellaneous accounts of William Worrill Wadley in Georgia, 1849—1850. Entries for 1859 and the first part of 1860 concern trips and moves of the Wadley family. From late 1860 onwards, Wadley’s entries are flavored by her strong convictions about the righteousness of the South and the Confederacy; after the war her entries became more scattered, eventually ceasing altogether in 1886 after the death of her father, William Morrill Wadley. Frequently mentioned are details of social life in the beleaguered Confederacy, with occasional details of the activities of her father, who served as superintendent of the Vicksburg, Shreveport and Texas Railroad manager for the Confederate government, and of her brother William Wadley, who performed quartermaster duty for the Confederate army in Louisiana. A typed transcription of the diary also is on file.

            In addition to the diary, there are ten miscellaneous items, including three Civil War items relating to a branch of the “Women’s Volunteer Aid Society” near Monroe, Louisiana, an 1869 letter from Sara Lois Wadley to her mother describing her meeting with Robert E. Lee at Lexington, Virginia, and an undated essay by Wadley on manners.

            The collection is arranged as follows: Series 1. Diaries and Series 2. Miscellaneous Materials.

Biographical Note

            The son of Dole Wadley (who had changed the spelling of his surname from Wadleigh), William Morrill Wadley (1812?—1882) was born in Brentwood, New Hampshire, moved to Georgia around 1834, and subsequently worked for the Central Railroad of Georgia. He married Rebecca Barnard Everingham (fl. 1840—1884), and together they had a number of children, including Sarah Lois Wadley (b. 1844), Mary Millen (“Miss Mary”) Wadley, William (“Willie”) Wadley, George Dole Wadley (b. 1857), and John Eviringham Wadley (b. 1860). After living near Monroe, Louisiana, before and during the Civil War, William Morrill Wadley moved his family back to Georgia in late 1865. Other relatives mentioned in these papers are Sarah Lois Wadley’s uncles, David Wadley (d. 1883) and Dole Wadley. Mary Millen Wadley married William Greene Raoul (1844—1913) after the Civil War.

            Sarah Lois Wadley was the author of two published works: A Brief Record of the Life of William M. Wadley, Written By His Eldest Daughter (1884), and In Memory of Rebecca Barnard Wadley (1906). There are biographical sketches of William Morrill Wadley in The National Cyclopedia of American Biography, I, 201, and in The Biographical Dictionary of the Confederacy, 422—423.

0001                Introductory Materials. 14 frames.

0015                Description of Series 1. 4 frames.

0019                Folder 1, Volume 1, August 8, 1859-June 19,

1861. 202 frames.

0221                Folder 2, Volume 2, June 23, 1861-April 17, 1863.

155 frames.

0376                Folder 3, Volume 3A, May 16-August 28, 1863. 52

frames.

0428                Folder 4, Volume 3B, August 29, 1863-February

11, 1864 (with Accounts of William Morrill Wadley, 1849-1850). 139 frames.

0567                Folder 5, Volume 4, February 16, 1864-May 13,

1865. 144 frames.

0712                Folder 6, Volume 5, May 18, 1865- August 27,

1886. 55 frames.

Reel 6

0001                Folder 7, Volume 6, Typed Transcriptions of

Volumes 1-2. 271 frames.

0272                Folder 8, Volume 7, Typed Transcriptions of

Volumes 3-5. 401 frames.

0673                Description of Series 2. 1 frame.

0674                Folder 9, Miscellaneous Materials, 4859-1871 and

Undated. 42 frames.

 

 

Wall, John Q. Letter, Mss. 893, 1862 [Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana; also Kentucky, Ohio, and Tennessee].  Location:  Reel 21A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            John Q. Wall enlisted as a private in the Pointe Coupee Artillery Battalion in September 1861 in Columbus, Kentucky.  He was exchanged as a prisoner of war, 10 November 1862. 

            This collection consists of one item, a letter, 21 April 1862, of John Q. Wall.  The letter was to his sister, Mrs. Pauline R. Setton of Ponchatoula, Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana.  In the letter, he describes his capture on Island Number 10, Missouri, and his imprisonment at Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio.

0572                Introductory Materials. 6 frames.

0578                Letter, 21 April 1862. 2 frames.

 

Wallace, H. A. Recollections, 1865 [Galveston, Texas] Location: Reel 23; Confederate Military Manuscripts, University of Texas at Austin

            This collection contains Wallace’s recollections of the surrender of Confederate States forces in Texas commanded by General Edmund Kirby Smith.

0533                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0536                Recollections, 1865. 11 frames.

 

Walworth, Douglas and Family Papers, Mss. 2471, 2499, 1806-1941 [Natchez, Mississippi; also Massachusetts].  Location:  Reel 20A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Douglas Walworth (b. 1833), a planter and attorney of Natchez, Mississippi, was born in Adams County, Mississippi.  Douglas’s father, John P. Walworth (1803-1883), was educated in New York and moved to Natchez, Mississippi, in 1819. He was a postal clerk, a planter in Louisiana and Arkansas, and president of the Planters’ Bank of Natchez.  Douglas Walworth attended school in Natchez and studied law at Harvard and Princeton universities.  He was admitted to the bar in Jackson, Mississippi, in 1855 and served in the state legislature, 1859-1860.  Douglas helped raise the Light Guard Battalion and was captain of Company I of the 16th Mississippi Infantry Regiment of the Confederate States Army.  After the war, Douglas resumed his legal practice and his activities as a planter.

            This collection consists of 189 items and ten manuscript volumes, papers, 1806-1941, of Douglas Walworth and family.  Correspondence, 1850-1868, discusses contemporary politics, social and economic conditions in Mississippi, and household and family matters.  Civil War papers, 1862-1865, concern Confederate States Army military administration.  Diaries of Douglas Walworth, 1850-1865 and 1881, describe childhood activities in Natchez, Mississippi, study and student life at Harvard University, and Confederate States Army military experiences.

            A list of Omissions from Douglas Walworth and Family Papers, Mss. 2471, 2499, 1806-1941, is provided on Reel 21, Frame 0294. Omissions consist of Folder 1, Gordon Family, 1812-1846 and Volume 1, Photocopy of Journal of Mr. A. Gordon, 1806-1811 and 1813.

0092                Introductory Materials. 19 frames.

0111                Folder 2, Walworth Family, Papers, 1850. 116

frames.

0227                Folder 3, Walworth Family Papers, February-June

1851. 85 frames.

0312                Folder 4, Walworth Family, Papers, July-August

1851, 72 frames.

 

Warnecke, Charles Diary, 1862—1863 [Galveston and Washington County, Texas] Location: Reel 23; Military Manuscripts, University of Texas at Austin

            This collection contains the diary of Charles Warnecke’s experiences in the Civil War and includes material relating to camp life, clothing issues, rations, and his participation in operations around Vicksburg, Mississippi. Warnecke served in Waul’s Legion.

0547                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0550                Warnecke (Charles) Diary. 40 frames.

 

 

Washburn & Hesler Ledger, Mss. 2289, 1861-1862 [Manassas, Virginia; also Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 21A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            W.W. Washburn and J.J. Hesler were Confederate States Army sutlers for the 7th Louisiana Infantry Regiment at Manassas, Virginia.

            This collection consists of one item, a ledger, 1861-1862, of Washburn & Hesler.  The indexed ledger contains accounts of merchandise purchased by officers and soldiers including Gen. Richard Taylor’s mess, the army hospital, and the Quartermaster’s Department.  Account entries list the price and type of merchandise purchased by soldiers and officers, as well as Washburn & Hesler’s expense, profit and loss, and freight accounts.

0580                Introductory Materials. 7 frames.

0587                Ledger, 1861-1862. 131 frames.

 

Watie, Stand Letters, 1838—1865 [Oklahoma; also District of Columbia] Location: Reel 23; Military Manuscripts, University of Texas at Austin

            This collection consists of correspondence by Stand Watie, an important leader in the Cherokee Nation and a Confederate general. The letters contain material on the Cherokee removal, the murder of Elias Boudinot in 1839, internal Cherokee political struggles, Confederate plans for the defense of the Indian Territory, and military operations of Stand Watie’s units during the war. Correspondents include Confederate General Edmund Kirby Smith.

0590                Introductory Materials. 4 frames.

0594                [Letters], 1838-1865. 121 frames.

 

West Feliciana Parish Military Board Minute Book, Mss. 1353, 1862-1870 [West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana].  Location:  Reel 21A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            The West Feliciana Parish Military Board was an organization formed to provide benefits to needy citizens of the parish during the Civil War.  Board members included Charles L. Mathews, John Hunter Collins, James Rudman, and J.N. Evans, Jr.

            This collection consists of one item, a minute book, 1862-1870 (bulk 1862-1863), of the West Feliciana Parish Military Board.  The volume records welfare benefit payments made to citizens, 1862-1863.  Notes by members of the Collins family and a cash account for 1870 of Calvin Goodman are included on the last three pages of the volume.

0718                Introductory Materials. 3 frames.

0721                Minute Book, 1862-1870. 12 frames.

 

Wharton, Edward Clifton Family Papers, Mss. 1553, 1575, 1594, 1610, 1613, 1660, 1714, 1736, 1819-1947 [New Orleans, Louisiana; also Texas].  Location:  Reel 22A, Confederate Military Manuscripts, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

            Edward Clifton Wharton (1827-1891), a resident of New Orleans, Louisiana, was a journalist and newspaper editor, writing under the pen names of “Orleanian,” “Easy Doubleyew,” and “Louisianian.”  He was also a successful playwright, author, and dramatic critic.  Educated at Jefferson College in St. James Parish, Louisiana, he served as a colonel in the Trans-Mississippi Department of the Confederate States Army.  Gen. George Wythe Baylor served as aide-de-camp to Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston (1803-1862) in Kentucky and continued to serve through the end of the war in Louisiana, Arkansas, and Texas.  Gen. John R. Baylor served in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona, and he was Confederate governor of Arizona.

            This collection consists of 1,130 items and eleven volumes, papers, 1819-1947 (bulk 1819-1901), of the Edward Clifton Wharton family.  Papers of four generations of the family comprise correspondence and other materials.  Correspondence includes letters of Edward Clifton Wharton; his father, Franklin Wharton; and other relatives, especially members of the Baylor family.  The Baylor letters, and correspondence and papers of Wharton and others, provide detailed information on the Civil War in Arizona, Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, Tennessee, and Texas, 1861-1865.  Items document secession and the seizure of Federal arms and facilities by Confederate forces.  Military units discussed include the Crescent Rifles, the Washington Artillery, the 13th Regiment of Louisiana Volunteers, the Central Army of Kentucky, and the Confederate States Army Quartermaster Department for Texas.  Correspondence of Confederate women discusses the custom of wearing scarves representing Confederate states, social activities and home life, personal hardships and sufferings caused by separation of family, scarcity of food and clothing, the high cost of living, services rendered by soldiers and military units, interest in war news, antagonism to Federal occupation, exchange of prisoners, and personal contacts with high ranking Confederate officers including generals.

            A list of omissions from Edward Clifton Wharton Family Papers, Mss. 1553, 1575, 1594, 1610, 1613, 1660, 1714, 1736, 1819-1947, is provided on Reel 22, Frame 0863. Omissions Consist of Folders 1-9, 1829-1860; Folder 14-end, 1866-1936; and Volumes 1-72. Omitted items include Photographs of Confederate Soldiers, officers, and civilians and undated items relating to the Confederate States of America.

0468                Introductory Materials. 40 frames.

0508                Folder 10, Papers, 1861. 81 frames.

0589                Folder 11, Papers, 1862. 152 frames.

0741                Folder 12, Papers, 1863. 50 frames.

0791                Folder 13, Papers, 1864-1865. 72 frames.

0863                List of Omissions from Edward Clifton Wharton

Family Papers, Mss. 1553, 1575, 1594, 1610, 1613, 1660, 1714, 1736, 1819-1947. 1 frame.

 

White, Maunsell Papers, 1802-1912, Plaquemines Parish and New Orleans, Louisiana.  Location:  Reel 1, Antebellum Southern Plantations. 

            Maunsell White was a New Orleans commission merchant and planter in the Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana.  His son, Maunsell White, Jr., (fl. 1835-1883) was also a merchant and planter.

            This collection consists largely of the business correspondence and plantation records of Maunsell White and his son, Maunsell White, Jr.  Documentation of their business interests is particularly strong from 1840 to 1875.  Both Maunsell White and Maunsell White, Jr., used either a single or a double “l” when writing Maunsell,” making identification of some material difficult.  There is very little information regarding the Whites’ family or personal lives.

            The volumes pertain chiefly to the operation of the Deer Range Plantation.  Eight memorandum books and daily journals of Maunsell White and Maunsell White, Jr., document business interests particularly those concerning the Deer Range Plantation as well as other mercantile and agricultural activities.  Some contain records of slave activity and care.  Scattered throughout the volumes are brief travel accounts, records of family births, and references to family and social activities.  Other volumes include an autograph book belonging to Maunsell White, Jr., while he was at the University of Virginia, and a poetic autograph book addressed to Edward Miles at St. Joseph’s College in Louisiana.

            Forty-six letters, 1805-1860, comprise a separate microfilm-only series.  These letters deal mostly with Maunsell White’s business affairs and with economic conditions, current events, and political appointments.  Included are a copy of letter from Maunsell White to Andrew Jackson and a letter from Zachary Taylor to White.  Letters from Maunsell White to his son, while the latter attended the University of Virginia, contain advice and admonitions regarding proper behavior and attitudes, as well as family, business and plantation news.

 

Biographical Note.

            Maunsell White (1783-1863) was born near Limerick, Ireland, and was orphaned at age six.  He came to America at the age of thirteen.  White settled in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, and became a New Orleans commission merchant and planter, operating Deer Range Plantation until his death in 1863.  White and his wife (whose name is unknown) had four children:  Maunsell White, Jr., Clara White (Mrs. Carl) Kohn, Mrs. Cuthbert Bullitt, and Mrs. Hu. Kennedy.

            Maunsell White, Jr. attended Mandeville College in Mandeville, Louisiana, a school in Baton Rouge, and the University of Virginia, the latter in 1850-1851.  He was appointed a cadet in the U.S. Army and then managed Deer Range Plantation until 1876.  Maunsell White, Jr. married Bettie Bradford in 1855; in 1858 he purchased Velasco Plantation, renaming it Junior Place.  The five children of Bettie and Maunsell White, Jr. include Maunsell White, III (1856-1912), Carl White, Nancy White (Mrs. Thomas) Anderson, David White, and Lucy White.  Maunsell White, III became a noted metallurgist and mining engineer.

 

Wight, Levi Lamoni Papers, 1836—1917 [Bandera, Burnet County, Double Horn, Fort Mason, Fredericksburg, Jefferson County, Medina County, San Antonio, and Sweetwater, Texas; also Iowa, Louisiana, and Missouri] Location: Reel 25; Military Manuscripts, University of Texas at Austin

            This collection consists of correspondence and autobiographical reminiscences of Wight relating to his experiences in Confederate Army in Texas and Louisiana during the Civil War.

0001                Introductory Materials. 13 frames.

0014                Description of Series 1.1.  1 frame.

0015                Folder 1, Papers, 1806-1912 and Undated. 114

frames.

0129                Folder 2, Volume 1, Maunsell White, Letter Book,

1845-1850. 420 frames.

 

 

Winans, Mary Susannah Album, ca. 1836—1854, East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana; also Mississippi; Location: Reel 25; Southern Women and Their Families in the 19th Century, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

            Mary Susannah Winans (1812—1892) was born in Centreville, Mississippi, and lived in Clinton, Louisiana. She married Isaac Wall.

            The collection consists of an album comprising a schoolgirl’s autograph book. It contains poems and loving messages to Mary, as well as newspaper clippings. The entries in the album may have been made at the time of graduation from an unidentified school. The volume itself is not dated, but a clipping in the volume is dated 1836 and one loose item in it is an 1854 program for anniversary exercises at Centenary College, Jackson, Louisiana; one of the speakers at this event was William Winans Wall of Clinton, Louisiana.

0716                Introductory Materials. 5 frames.

0721                Mary Susan Winans, Album, ca. 1836-1854. 49

frames.

 

 

Wood, Trist Papers, 1800-1856, Ascension Parish and New Orleans, Louisiana.  Location:  Reel 6, Antebellum Southern Plantations. 

            Trist Wood (d. 1952) of New Orleans, Louisiana, appears to have worked chiefly as an artist, editor, and illustrator.  After 1915, he seems to have turned his attention to genealogy, compiling extensive records on families related to his own and on Zachary Taylor (1784-1850), from whom he was descended.

            The collection contains originals and copies of wills, deeds, inventories, letters, and other papers related to families of several states, from colonial times to the twentieth century, and extensive compilations of family histories gathered by Wood.  These families all unite in the Wood family of Louisiana, and include the Wood and Crooke families of Rhode Island, the Dabney and Jennings families of Virginia, the Taylor and Trist families of Virginia and Louisiana, and others.  Also included in this collection are the following:  papers of the Bringier family of New Orleans, 1808-1852; including many items relating to the buying and selling of slaves (most of these items are in French); the diary of Robert Crooke Wood (1799-1869) of Rhode Island, while an army surgeon during the Mexican War, 1846-1847; letters from H. B. Trist (1802-1856), Louisiana sugar planter, to his family, particularly to his children at school in Germany and New Orleans, 1852-1856; recollections of Trist Wood’s father, Robert Crooke Wood (1832-1900), New Orleans businessman and city councilman, including letters to his family while traveling in the United States in the 1870s and to Mexico and Colombia to the 1880s; and letters from Trist Wood while he worked as an artist and editor in Paris and London, 1893-1905.

            Zachary Taylor was a special interest of both Robert Crooke Wood and Trist Wood, and the collection contains many items relating to Taylor.  These include a biographical sketch, a scrapbook of clippings dated 1848 through 1850, and about one hundred photographs of paintings, drawings, etc. of Taylor.

            Please note that this inventory incorporates part of the inventory to the Trist Wood Papers that was compiled in the 1940s and 1950s.  The order of the papers has been modified slightly, folders have been renumbered, and the description of the papers has been streamlined, with some additions and revision.

            A list of omissions from the Trist Wood Papers is provided on reel 6, frame 0284, and includes Subseries 1.2-1.5, Correspondence, 1865-1952 and Undated; Subseries 2.1, Volumes, 1846-1898; Series 3, Zachary Taylor, 1848-1930s; and Series 4, Genealogical Materials, 1915-1952.

0001                Introductory Materials. 15 frames.

0016                Description of Subseries 1.1. 1 frame.

0017                Folder 1, 1808-1812. 40 frames.

0057                Folder 2, 1821-1828. 29 frames.

0086                Folder 3, 1834-1853. 40 frames.

0126                Folder 4, 1854-1856. 111 frames.

0237                Description of Subseries 2.2 1 frame.

0238                Folder 81, Portfolio of Reproductions in Halftone of Paintings, Photographs, Drawings, etc., Depiciting the Ancestors of Trist Wood, Undated. 46 frames.

0284                List of Omissions from the Trist Wood Papers. 1 frame.

 

 

Acknowledgement

 

 

 

            Confederate Military Manuscripts Louisiana State University Libraries, Baton Rouge, are a microfilm project of University Publications of America, an imprint of LexisNexis Academic & Library Solutions of Bethesda, Maryland. The original documents are the holdings of the Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections, Louisiana State University Libraries, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

 

            Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War are a microfilm project of University Publication of America, an imprint of LexisNexis Academic & Library Solutions of Bethesda, Maryland. The original documents are the selections from Series J, Part 5: Louisiana of the Southern Historical Collection, Manuscripts Department, Library of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

 

            Records of the Louisiana Confederate Pension Applications Collection are a microfilm project of the Louisiana State Archives taken from the originals located at The Louisiana State Archives, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

 

            Confederate Military Manuscripts, The Trans-Mississippi West, University of Texas, Austin are a microfilm project of University Publications of America, an imprint of LexisNexis Academic & Library Solutions of Bethesda, Maryland. The original documents are the holdings of The Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin, Part 1: The Trans-Mississippi West.

 

            Records of Southern Plantation from emancipation to the Great Migration are a microfilm project of University Publications of America, an imprint of LexisNexis Academic & Library Solutions of Bethesda, Maryland. The original documents are the selections from the Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections, Louisiana State University Libraries, Part 3: Louisiana Sugar Plantations (Bayou Lafourche and Bayou Teche).

 

            Southern Women and Their Families in the 19th Century: Papers and Diaries are a microfilm project of the University Publications of America, an imprint of LexisNexis Academic & Library Solutions of Bethesda, Maryland. The original documents are the holdings of the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Parts 1-3, Mary Susan Ker Papers, 1785-1923, Roach and Eggleston Family Papers, 1830-1905, Louisiana and Mississippi Collections.